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I 




THE LIBRARY 

OF v* .. 

THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIFORNIA 

IN MEMORY OF I \ 

Mr. & Mrs. Sydney B. Mitchell* 




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CISTINEjE. 

• THE 

NATURAL ORDER OF CISTUS, 

OR 

ROCK-ROSE; 

IlLUSTftATBD BY 

COLOURED FIGURES & DESCRIPTIONS 

OF All TBS 

DISTINCT SPECIES, AND THE MOST PROMINENT VARIETIES, THAT 
COULD BE AT PRESENT PROCURED 

IH TBI 

GARDENS OF GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH THE BEST DIRECTIONS 

FOR TURIR 

CULTIVATION AND PROPAGATION. 



BY 

ROBERTlSWEET, F.L.S. 

AVTHOR OF BORTUt §UBVRBA*US lONPIMBIftlS; HORTUS BRITAMMICUff 

BOTAKICAL CULTIVATOR; THB BRITMB PLOWBR GARBS* ; 

•BBABlACBJt; FLORA AUtTRAlAJlCA ; TBB FLORUITS OVIOB ; TBB 

BRITISH WARBLRRt, &C. 



LONDON: 
JAMES RIDGWAY, 169, PICCADILLY. 

1625-1830. 



TILLING, PRINTER, CHEL§KA. 



GIFT 






ADVERTISEMENT. 



The present Volume contains all the figures of the dif- 
ferent species, and the most prominent varieties, that the 
Author has at present been able to procure : he has, there- 
fore, brought the work to a conclusion ; which he be- 
lieves will be more agreeable to the greater part of his 
Subscribers, than to keep it open for a length of time, 
to admit others occasionally, as they may be newly in- 
troduced to the gardens, or as the old species might be 
sometimes found in obscure collections, where they are 
little expected to be. 

A great many interesting species that were plentiful 
in the nursery collections some years back, are not now 
to be met with, many of them being sufficiently hardy 
to endure a favourable Winter without protection, but 
to be destroyed by a severe one, when the least covering 
would preserve them ; the correct names of them were 
also so little known, and one substituted for another so 
frequently, that caused less attention to be paid to them 
than they deserved, which we hope will not be the case 
in future, as a very little protection is sufficient for the 
whole of them, and nothing produces a more brilliant 
effect, than a collection of them planted in rock- work, 
or even grown in small pots, and placed together in a 
clump, where the different colours may all be intermixed, 
or kept separate, according to the taste or fancy of the 
possessor. 



602 



iv ADVERTISEMENT. 

We are aware that there are still several species in the 
different collections, that we have not met with in flower ; 
three or four species in Mr. Anderson's collection, at the 
Botanic Garden at Chelsea, some others in Mr. Barclay's 
collection, at Bury-Hill ; those at the Chelsea Botanic 
Garden have not yet flowered, most probably owing, to 
the cold wet Summer; several annual species that we' 
have often raised from seeds several years back, we hftve 
not been fcble to procure since the commencement of the 
present publication . 

We have also given a description of the Natural Order 
and of the published species that we have not been for* 
tunate enough to meet with ; this should be placed at 
the beginning of the work, to follow the list of books 
referred to, which must also follow the title-page. 

To A* B. Lambert, Esq. we render our grateful ac- 
knowledgments for allowing us free access to his Li- 
brary and Herbarium, which has been of great service 
to us in determining the plants of different authors, 
piany of the original specimens from the authors them- 
selves being now in Mr. Lambert's collection. To Mr* 
William Anderson, the worthy Curator of the Chelsea Bo- 
tanic Garden, we have also to return our best thanks, for 
his ^ikdtiess in allowing us to make drawings of several 
rare species, which we have not met with in any other 
collection ; and also to the various Nurserymen, for their 
readiness in assisting us with specimens or plants for 
drawing and description, from their various establish- 
mentSi 



BOOKS REFERRED TO. 



? /'. 



AU.JL pad. Allioni (Carolus.) Flora Pe- 
deniottu*.'* Monies i**Ito. Tautini. 

BarreW&Piktii per Gafliim, f f b pan Um , 
et ItaUanu • bsemtav Iconibus tfnew ex- 
hibi3u9ak%KreIh*o. tot. 1714. 

Bot, asag^ntis's BotaoicalMacuiDe^coQ- 
tinuetf by Ji Sims, and jf . Betifenden Rer, 
now conducted by W. J. Hooker. 8vo. 

Botox, regist. Edwards (Sydenham.) The 
Itotank^JRegilter, deWiptiop* by J# 
BeUen&nKer.Svo. 1815 et seq. 

Brot.fi. Juh as«rfERO» (Felix lAvelkii.) 
Flora Lusitanica. 2 voL in 8vo. Olusipo- 

Cava*, ic. CavanilIbs (Ant Joe.) Icones 
et Destortj+nes Fhutfaruite cpe aut 
sponte' in Hispania crescunt ant in hortis 
hospiftantur. 6i«i 4 R Afin+iti. 17ft*- 
1800. 

Cbu. ftt^Ck^sr&i.atvFEQitfSB (Goarlet 
de) Rariorum Plantarum Historia. fol. 
1601. : T . ' 

Csfo. cataU Coltill (James.) A Cata- 
logue *f>Phmrts, dotttofted Jbr«fe at the 
Nursery of J. Colvill, Chelsea. 12mo. 

Comp.forSJkrU: 8atrrto{J* Edward.) Com- 
pendium Florae Britannic*, edit. 4. 12mo. 
1825. irr • 

Crate atuL Craxtz (Hear. Job. Nepom.) 
StirpramWtfsWtiR, 8vo. W62. 

DC. yrodr.tp* Candors (Augustin Py- 
ramns.) Ptafrtftjras syiteJnatl* natnrab 
regni yegetabilis. ParUiis. 8vo. 1824 et 

Jte*/?atZ« Dbsfontainbs (Rene Louche.) 
Flora Atlantic*. 4 vol. in 4to. Paris. 
1708 et 1700. 

DiQ. elthl fehxEftiot (Job. Jac.) Hortus 
Eltitamensis. fol. 1788. 

Da Hornet, orb. DchambL da Moncbau 
(Henry JUmia.) Traite des arbras et ar- 
bustes qui se cultfeent en France en 
pleuieteW 4to«9 vofe. Paris. 17*6, 

Dunal t» DC^prodr. TJuNALQVfich. Felix.) 
CMneae ineditse, dec In De Candolle's 
Prodromns Systema VegetabiEs. 1824. 

FUr. dam. Icones Piantarnm sponte nas- 
eentium in regnis Danise et Norvegise, 
etc fol. 1761 et seq. 

Flar. grate. Sibthorp (Job.) Flora Grssca. 
ed. J. E. Snritb. fasc. in fol. London. 
1806 elseq. 



Gart. frnct. Gjultner (Jqsephmu) fto 

frac6bns et semlnlbus plantarum. 2 vol. 

in 4to. Lipria. 1788. 1791* 
Ger. gatlo-prov. Gerard (Jobn.) Flora 

Gfdlo-proyincialis, 8vo. 1761, 
"Hort. Ketc. Alton (William Tbwnsend.) 

Hortus Kewensis. «dit, 2. & vol. 8vo» 

1810—1813. 
Jacq. oust. Vow Jacob** <jNk*l tym.) 

Florae Austriace icones. 5 vol. in for. 

Vmaobonm. 1778—1778. 
Jacq. coU. Von Jacquin (Nicol. Jos.) 

Collectanea ad Botsftrioai%6lg.-ipectBEi* 

tia. ft vol. in 4to. Vxndobon*. 1786— 

1796. 
Jacq. kort. schctnb. Jacquin (Nicol. Jos.) 
. Ptertanun nriorom hyrti c«sard>8cb*n*» 

brunensis. 4 vol. in nri. Vienna. 1797 — 

1804. 
Jacq. hart. vind. Jacquin (Nicol. Jos.) 

Hortus potftRtato TiJidob4ienA*. 4 vol. 

in fol. Vindobona. 1770—1776. 
Jacq, U> nan Yob JicQin* (N*W/ JaLJ 

Icones Piantarnm rariorum. 8 vol. in fol, 

Viudooimk.im-XTVL* * 
Jacq. mite. Von Jacquin (Nicol.' Jos.) 

MisoaflaiiBaAiiitrfafcaadDotiaaca»,e^; 

spectantia. Vindobona. 4to^ 1770—1781. 
Lagatt.gan.4t apse taoAscA ^Mariano/} 

Geuera.at species plantaram quae aut 

novae aut n&dflm ttecte cogiioiWrirhr. 

MadriH.lW. - . « y 

Mam. did'. Mows? de xa IKakc* ( Jean 

Bapt) Encycbpedif me^dtaoe BajtRn 
' mqne. Paris. 1784et«eq.' 7> * ' 
Limkenvm. Ljnw (Kenr. FridOEnpme-. 

ratio pmtrtatum hotfS tegi botanicl ftero- 

Linn. mant. Linnjeus (Caroius.) Mantissa 
Dlantaram ^ fei^iB^e^tioinV 6, «t, ft*, 
cierum editionis 2. Holmta. 1767. 8vo. 



plantarum. 8vo. Bolmue. ed. II. 1762— 



IMS.. 



£odd. ooi. c<<6. Loddiges (Conrad and 

Sons.) Loddiges* Botanical Qajifoet;? 

London. 1817 et seq. 
Magn. bat. Maonol (Petrus.) Botanicon 

Monspeliense. I vol. 12mo. Montptlii. 

1686. 
Mich.fi. amor. Michaux (Andre.) Flora 

boreali Americana. 2 vol. 8vo. Parisiis. 

1808. 



VI 



BOOKS REFERRED TO. 



Mill diet. Miller (Philip.) Gardener and 
Florist's Dictionary. London. 

Mill ie. Millbr (Philip.) Figures of plants 
described in the Gardeners Dictionary. 
2vol.fol. London. 1760. 

NuttaU gen. amer. Nuttall (Thomas.) 
The genera of North American ptoses, 
and a Catalogue of the specks* 2 vol. 
12mo. Philadelphia. 1818. 

Park, theatr. Parkinson (John.) TTiea- 
trum botanicttm. 1 vol. fd. London. 1640. 

Per*, eyn. Persoon (Christ. Henr.) %- 
aopsu Plantarum, sea Enchiridium Bo- 
tanicom. 2 vol.l2mo. Paris. 1805—1807. 

Pourr. act. touL Pour ret (Andr.) His- 
toire et Memoires de l'Academie royale 
des sciences, etc de Toulouse. S toL 4to. 
Toulamo. 1782-^1738. 

Pwrskfl. amer. Pursh (Frederick.) Flora 
America Septentrionalis. 2 vol. 8yo. Low- 
don. 1814. 

Scop, mtu* BcoroLi (Job. Ant.) Flora 
Canuetica, 1 vol. 8vo. VUnn*. 1760. 

Smith eng. bot. Smith (James Edward.) 
English Botany. 8vo. London. 1790 et seq. 

Stpreng. tyst. veg. Sprengel (Kurt.) 8ys- 
tesaa Vefletabtttam. 4 toL 8vo. GoUmga. 
182t»~ 1827. 

Swt. hort. brit. Sweet (Robert.) Hortus 
Britannicus, or a Catalogue of the plants 
cultivated in the gardens of Great Bri- 
tain. 1 vol 8vo, London. 1827. 



Swt. hort. oub.lond. Sweet (Robert.) Hor- 
Ids Subuibanus Londinensis, or a Cata- 
logue of the plants cultivated in the gar- 
dens about London. 1 vol. 8vo. London. 
1816. 

Ten. oynopo. Jt. neap. Tenors (Michel.) 
Synopsis Novarum Plaatanun qua? In 
ProdxomoFloneNeapolitana^anDol811- 
1* edito. 

Vmhl epnb. Vahl (Martinus.) Symbol* 
Botanic*. S fine* in sat Hannim. 1790— 
17^4. 

Vent, eels. Venter at (Etienne Pierre.) 
Description des plantes nouvelles ou peu 
connues du jardin de J. M. Cels. 1 *ol. fin 
fbl. Pane. 1800. 

Wahttn. holv. Wahlsurrg (Georg.)De 
vegetatione et clymaie Helvetia? septen- 
trionalis specimen. 1 vol. in 8vo. TnricL 
181S. 

Walt. fior. car. Walter (Thomas,) Flora 
Carolinian* 1 voL8vo. Londini.UBS. 

WUld. ennm. Willdenow. (Car. Lud.) 
Enomeratio Plantarum horti bot Bern* 
linensis. 2 vol. Svo. Berolini. 1809. 

WiUd. hort. bar. Willdenow (Car. Lud.) 
Hortns Berotifieniis. rase m foL Berolini. 
1806—1810. 

WiUd. $p. pi. Willdenow (Car. Lud.) 
Species Plantarum. voL 5. 8vo. Btr o i i ni . 
1797—1810. 



Inthe~Pr4*$,au4*o<mwMb€Publtih*d,MO*xVol*mf, 

TttB SECOND EDITION OP 

4W&BTS HORTUS BRITANNICUS; being a Catalogue of ail the Plants culti- 
vate} hi thai Gardens of Great Britain, including all the published new introductions up 
torttepretett'time; arvtiEjed according to their aatural affinities, with the addition of 
fee LbRMtn Chases and Orders, Systematic and English Names, where native, when 
fus^khscusl, colour of the flown, aecentaations, references to the books where described, 
and also to figures, &c; aiTaiit^ accordiiig to the nK)st modem Impn^rementB. 



CISTINEJE. 



Calycit sepala 5 cum pedioello contiaua persistenti* saepiiis ingequalia, 
2 exteriora ceteris saepius minora interd&m evanida, 3 interiora per restivm- 
tioaem contort*, Petaia 5 hypogyna, caduca, aequalia, per aestivationem 
contorta, led durectioae sepalis contraria. Stamina numero indefinite, s»- 
pius numerosa, hypogyna, erecta. Filamenta libera. Anther* ovate, bit 
loculares, birimoss, baai inserts. Ovarium liberum. Stylus 1 filifogmis. 
Stigma simplex. Capsula constans valyis $-5, rarius 10, nunc medio ner- 
vum longitudinalem placentarium gerentibus et tunc capsula l-locularfs, 
nunc nervo medio in septum plus minusve completum abeunteet tunc cap- 
sula complete aut incomplete multilocularis. Semina ided semper vere t>a- 
rietalia, sed nunc placentas parieti contiguae nunc septi angulo interno adnxa 
phirima, parvula. Albumen farinosum. Embryo spiralis aut curvus intra 
albumen. -Sufirutices aut Herbse. Foiia timpUda, pennmenria, integra 
aut subdentata, primordialia temper oppasita, cetera noma* opporita* tnter- 
dum aiterna, bad nunc nuda u nunc stipulis bvnufoliaceu instructa. Racemi 
sape fivrikm* unilatoralibu* pediceUatu successive evolutu et idea feri scor- 
pwidei. Flores roeaeei, petalisjugacimmis, s&pius epkemeri, temper diur- 
ni,flavialbi aut purpurei, ungue saspe discolore. Rami succp glutinoso tape 
abdwetu — Ordo affinis hinc Yiolarieis quibuscum olim confusus et ,k qutbus 
difFert pnecipue staminibus indefinitis, iilinc Bixineis k qqibiis nbn differt 
nisi petalis semper praesentibus nee interdum milks, tepalorum mtivjatione 
8ubdivers&, albumine farinaceo, foliis nunqu&m pellucidis, etc. DC. prodr. 
v. 1. p. 263. 



CISTUS. Supra folio 1. 

Sect. I. EryT hroCistus. Sepala externa angnstfora, saepe minora, 
interna basi concara margine scariosa. Petaia rosea, rubra aut purpurea. 
Capsula 5-loculares. 

1. C. c&mplicdtus (Lam. diet. 2. p. 14.) Leaves petiolate, roundish 
ovate, bluntish, clothed with a white woolKness, crowded, undertfeath net- 
ted- veined : petioles dilated at the base, somewhat hollow and sheathing, 
the margins hairy : flower-stalks short, 1 -flowered, in thsees or fours* ter- 
minating the branches, fe. — Native of the Levant, and the Bwantasna of 
Valencia, in Spain. Flowers small, rose-coloured* 

2. C. sericeus (Vahl symb. 1. p. 37.) Leaves ovate, woolly, three- 
nerved ; lower ones on footstalks; upper ones sessile : flower-stalks hairy, b. 
— Native of Spain. — Flower-stalks clothed with long purplish hairs : petals 
and filaments purple. 

3. Chi/bridus (Vahl symb. 1. p. 37.) Leaves on footstalks, ovate, 
hoary: branches scaly: flower-stalks elongated, hairy. 1?. — Native of 
Spain : petals purple. 

Sect. II. Lbdonia. Sepala 5, 2 externa majora valde acuminata 
vel nulla ; petaia alba aut albida ; stamina numerosa pisttllo longiora ; stig- 
ma subseasile magnum capitatum, capsular 5-10-loculares.*— Frutices aut 
sufirutices, folia saepe glutinosa* 



viii OISTINEJE. 

4. C. Lidan (Lam. diet. 2. p. 17.) Leaves connected at the base, ph- 
longly lanceolate, nerved; upper side smooth and glossy; underneath cloth- 
ed with silky wool : flowers in a corymbed cyme : flower-stalks and calyx 
clothed with silky wool, h . — Nativeof the South of France. — Flowers white. 
Duham. arb. 1. p. 168. t. 66. — This species was plentiful in collection* 
some years back, but we know not where to find it at present. 

5. C. SidSritis (Spreng. syst. v. 4. pars. 2. p. 205.) Stem decumbent ; 
leaves petiolate, obovate, somewhat rugged, underneath clothed with .a 
white woolliness : flower-stalks solitary, elongated, 1 to 2-flowered, the 
upper part jointed, and with the calyx woolly, flowers nodding before flower- 
ing* b. — Native of Sicily. 

6. C. parvijblws. Stem erect, very much branched : branches erect, 
rather crowded, densely woolly : leaves small, ovate, acute, rounded at the 
base, undulate, rugged, netted-veined, slightly crenulate at the margins, 
hairy on both sides, slightly hoary : flower-stalks axillary, 1 to 3-flowered, 
nodding before expansion : sepals taper-pointed, and clothed with bunchea 
of hairs. J? — Native of the South of Europe. — Flowers white. 



HELIANTHEMUM. Supra fol.2. 

Sect. I. Halimium. Suprafol.4. * Sty lo brevi recto. 

1. H. Libandtis (Willd. enum. 670.) Stem shrubby, smoothish, branch- 
ing : leaves sessile, linear, the margins rolled back, upper side of a browniflh 
green, underneath whitish : bractes oblongly linear, shorter than the li 
flowered flower-stalks : calyx of three smooth, glossy, ovate, taper-pointed 
sepals. T?. — Native of Portugal, Italy, and Barbary. Barrel, io. 804* 
Ledon VIII. Clus. hist. 1. p. 80. ic. — Petals straw-coloured ; style about 
half the length of the stamens : stigma small.— This species was frequent 
in the collections a few. years back, but we do not know that it is in amy 
at present ; it is nearest related to H. vnbellatwm. 

** Stylo subnullo, stigmate magno. 

2. H. alyaoides (Vent, choix. t. 20.) Stem frutescent, very much 
branched, diffusely spreading; upper part of the branches clothed with white 
wool and hairs intermixed : leaves sessile, attenuated towards the base, ob- 
longly ovate, bluntish, and clothed with short hairs ; while young whitish 
turning green by age : flower-stalks terminal, solitary, or umbelled, 1-2- 
flowered, longer than the leaves : calyx of 3 sepals, taper-pointed, hairy, h* 
— • Native of Spain, and the West of France.— Petals yellow, with a dark 
spot at the base : flower-bud dark purple towards the point — The present 
plant was not unfrequent at the JN urseries some years ago, where it waa 
considered a spreading variety of H. algarvenee; and, from its habit, waa 
not so much esteemed. We believe it has now quite disappeared from 
them ; but is most probably still cultivated in some of the gardens in the 
neighbourhood of Paris. Ventenat's figure was from a plant cultivated in 
the garden of M. Cels. 

3. II. atriplicifdlium ( W. enum. 569.) Stem shrubby, erect : branches 
covered with white patches, or spots : leaves on footstalks, broadly ovate, 
bluntish, undulate towards the base, covered on both sides with silvery 
spots : flower-stems racemose, hairy : calyx hairy, of 3 sepals, or rarely. 
5 sepals, the 2 outer ones very small, f? . — Native of Spain. Barrel, ic. 
t. 282. Stem 4 to 6 feet high; upper leaves sessile : hairs long, hairy, 
brownish : petals large, yellow. — We saw numerous plants of this species 



€*MTINE2E. ix 

a* the Nursery of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, several years ago ; but we 
do not know any collection that possesses it at present. 

' 4. H. lasihtthum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 76.) Stem somewhat shrubby, very 
much branched: branches hoary, tinged with black, the upper part clothed 
With white wool, and spreading hairs intermixed; leaves nearly sessile, 
ovately oblong, more or less bluntish, keeled, obscurely ash-coloured, and 
clothed with short dense wool ; flower-stalks 1-2- flowered, very short, 
hafry ; cafyx varying, with 8* to b sepals, very hairy, t*. — Native of Por- 
tugal; — Ff6wer-stems, calyces, and young leaves, clothed with long white 
hairfrj calyx sometimes with 5 sepals, the two outer ones very narrow, with 
a" smooth point ; petals yellow, sometimes with a dark spot near the' base. ' 

5. H, involucrdtum (Pers. syn. '2. p. 76.) Stem somewhat shrubby, 
4fecl, branching : branches clothed with short ash-coloured wool ; lower 
leaVeVbh footstalks, nearly ovate, small, clothed with short white tomen- 
ttoti* i 'upper ones oblongly lanceolate, sessile, greenish, somewhat rough ; 
fl&Wer-stems very shbrt, surrounded by the leaves ; calyx of 5 sepals : inner 
one* clothed with white tomentum : outer ones linear, smoothish, greener.?} . 
— Native of Spain, and Portugal. 

Sect. II. Lech bo i dbs. Supra folio 11. 

6. H. corymbbsum. Stem slightly frutescent, erect, branching : branches 
forked, somewhat pubescent, the upper part clothed with short ash-coloured 
Wool* stem-leaves alternate, lanceolately oblong, bluntish, underneath 
efetfieti with grey tomentum : upper ones with revolute margins; corymbs of 
lbw#rs closely crowded ; calyx clothed with white wool, and hairs inter J 
mixed : outer sepals linear and obtuse : inner ones ovate, and acute, a little 
shorter that* the capsule ; style very short, f} . — Native of North America, 
fro** Niew Jersey to Georgia. Flowers pale yellow. 

* 7. H. rotmarifHfdlium (Pursh fl. amer. 2. p. 364.) Stem erect, forked] 
branching': branches quite erect, pubescent ; leaves oblongly linear, mar-i 
gifts generally revolute, underneath clothed with white tomentum ; small 
axillary branches very shortly pedunculate, 1-3-flowered, shorter than the 
leaves ; inner sepals ovate, acute, three times smaller than the petals. % . — 
Wfcthre of various parts of North America, Georgia, Canada, and round 
Bdettta, according to different authors. — Flowers small, crowded ; capsule 
gtoiey, 8-sided, brown ; petals pale yellow. 

8. H. tamuliflbtum (Mich. fl. amer. 1. p. 308.) Stems erect, hairy, 
pfevAtared, upper part somewhat forked, branching; flowering branches 
slender; stem-leaves lanceolately elliptic, or oblong, acute, margin 
sdafeery revolute, underneath clothed with a white tomentum ; flowers pe- 
dunculate, solitary; inner sepals broadly ovate, taper-pointed ; capsule glo-' 
buJar, about the length of the calyx. %. — Native of Cardlina. — Flower- 
stalks and calyx hairy ; style very short, erect ; flowers yellow. 

9'? H.'tfAcorridfttm (DC. prodr. 1. o. 284.) Stem erect, somewhat fru- 
tesceat ; leaves alternate, oblong, stipulate, somewhat crowded in bunches; 
sepals 3; petals 5, obcordate.^. — Native of Mexico. Moc. et Sesse flor. 
me*, icon. ined. 

10? H. tripttehim (DC. prodr. 1. p. 284.) Stems numerous, erect, 
deader ; leaves alternate, linear, without stipules ; sepals 5, the 2 outer" 
0te* email; linear ; petals & — Native of Mexico. — Moc. et Sesse fl. mex. 
ic. ined. 

11 ? H. a$ftjlum (DC. prodr. 1. p. 284.) Stems dwarf, spreading, sub- 
leaves- somewhat alternate, stipulate, oval-oblong ; sepals 6 ?• 
b 



x CISTINEAJ. 

2 outer ones linear, very small ; style none; stigma somewhat 3-lofoed.*.— 
Native of New Spain. — Moc. et Sesse fl. mex. ic. ined. 

We have placed the last three species in this Section, chiefly, because 
all the American species we have yet seen, belong to it. 

Sect. III. Tuberaria. Supra folio 18. 

12. H. globularuefblium (Pers. syn. 2. p. 77.) Perennial ; stems as- 
cending, simple, upper part nearly naked ; root-leaves with long footstalks, 
somewhat spathulate, obtuse : stem ones sessile, acute, the whole hairy ; 
flower-stalks in a few-flowered cyme, bearing a bracte at the base * calyx 
smooth, i/ . — Native of the North of Portugal. — Petals yellow, spotted at 
the base, or sometimes not spotted ; stamens violaceus. 

13. H.6ifpfeMri/o/ittin(l)unalinDC.prodr. p. 270.) Stem herbaceous, 
erect, clothed at the base with a white pubescence : the upper part smooth,, 
and somewhat glossy ; leaves oblong, acute, smooth, tapering downwards, 
into a long footstalk : stem ones opposite : the upper ones alternate, and 
bearing stipules ; flower-stalks long, clothed with a hairy pubescence ; pedi- 

' eels and calyx clothed with long hairs. V-Tl — Native of Spain, and Portugal- 
— Pedicels without bractes; outer sepals ovate, obtuse, about half the length 
of the inner ones, which are acute ; stipules long, somewhat linear. 

14. H. heterodbxum (Dunal in DC. prodr. p. 270.) Stem erect, her- 
baceous, hairy : hairs long, white ; leaves sessile, oblongly lanceolate, 
rough, woolly, nerves on the upper side hairy : lower ones opposite : upper 
ones alternate, bearing stipules ; racemes secund, hairy, without bractes ; 
flowers on short footstalks, near each other, somewhat imbricate ; outer 
sepals largest, closing in the inner ones, similar to the bractes !Q? — Na- 
tive of Africa, near Valle ; also, in Spain. — Outer sepals hairy on both 
sides : inner ones smooth inside, glossy, with a membranaceous margin ; 
capsule somewhat pointed ; seeds numerous, nearly globular, pale yellow, 
glaucous, roughish ; flowers yellow. 

15. H. plant agineum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 77.) Stem herbaceous, erect, 
hairy; leaves elliptically lanceolate, opposite, sessile, 3-nerved : underneath 
clothed with shaggy wool, hairy on the nerves : upper side hairy, lire 
hairs simple, and closely pressed to the leaves : upper ones more or less al- 
ternate, oblongly linear, bearing stipules ; racemes short, without bractes ; 
outer sepals smoothish, narrowly linear, about equal with the inner ones, 
which are clothed with white shaggy wool ; petals slightly tooflied.0. — 
Native of Crete, Corsica, Spain, ana the North of Africa. — Plant clothed 
with white hairs ; petals yellow, and not spotted. 

16. H. guttdtum (Mill. diet. n. 18.) Stem herbaceous, annual, some- 
what hairy ; leaves opposite, sessile, oblongly linear, 3-nerved, clothed with 
shaggy hairs : the extreme upper ones alternate ; racemes loose, without 
bractes ; flower-stalks filiform, nearly naked ; outer sepals about half the 
length of the inner ones.0. — Native of England ? France, Italy, Spain, 
Portugal, and Turkey ; but is not H. eriocatoon intended for some of the 
above habitats ? Not having seen a wild specimen of the English plant, 
we are not certain to which of the two it belongs; the one generally cul- 
tivated in flower borders, is H. eriocaulon, which is readily known by its 
very hairy stem, and bracteate racemes ; the stem of H. guttdtum being 
nearly smooth, and the racemes without bractes. — Petals yellow, with a 
dark spot near the base. 

17. H. inconsptcuum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 77.) Stem slender, herbaceous, 
branching, 2~3*forked, thinly hairy; leaves opposite, narrow, oblongly 



CIST1NEJE. xi 

linear, hairy : upper ones stipulate : extreme upper ones alternate ; racemes 
long, vesy. slender ; flower-stalks short, all leaning to one side ; .flowers 
minute ; petals oblongly linear, smaller than the calyx, every other one 
with a hairy margin.©. — Native of Spain, and Corsica. — Petals yellow. 

Sect. IV. Macularia. DC. prodr. 1. p. 271. 

Calyx 5-sepalus, sepalis externis angustis, internis striatis. Petala lu- 
' tea, basi maculata. Stylus rectus erectusque ovario duplo longior, stami- 
uibus siijoesqualis. • Stigma parvum, subtrilobum. Capsula laevis. — Suffru- 
tipes *ut hecbae ? VoUa.petiolata,penninervia 9 angusta, exstipuldta. Flores 
terminates, solitarii *eu racemori ; racemis paucifloris: pedicelli secundi, basi 
hracpBoii; braoteis subulatis parvulia. DC. prodr. 1. p. 271. 
• 18. H. lunuldtum (DC. fl. fr. 4. p. 816.) Stem suffrutescent, some- 
what twisted, branching: branches .very slender, pubescent; leaves flat, 
oblong, tapering to the base, the margins more or less fringed ; flowers ter- 
jPMual, on* short footstalks, solitary, or from 2 to 4 in a sort of racemed 
umbel. 1?, — Native of the Alps, at Piedmont. All. auct. p. 30. t. 2. f. 3. 
— Calyx when in flower reflexed ; petals yellow, nearly entire, or very 
slightly notched, marked with a saffron-coloured crescent-shaped spot a lit- 
tle above the unguis. 

19. IL petiot&tum. Stem herbaceous? twisted at the base: branches 
slender, ascending, somewhat forked, clothed with patches of ash-coloured 
wool ; leaves oblongly linear, acute, tapering down into a long slender 
footstalk, clothed on both sides with leprous patches of wool ; the upper 
side of a bluish green, underneath hoary; racemes small, few-flowered ; 
flower-stalks and calyx pubescent.©? — Native of Spain. 

Sect. V. Brachypetalum. Supra folio 41. 

20. H.villdsum (Pens. syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem woolly, with hairs inter- 
mixed, of a sort of > ash-colour; leaves stipulate, petiolate, oblongly lan- 
ceolate, slightly toothed, clothed on both sides, particularly underneath 
with long shaggy wool ; racemes long, the flowers all leaning to one side 
before flowering, re volute at the point, axillary, and terminal ; flower-stalks 
erect, clothed with ash-coloured shaggy hairs, nearly opposite the bractes ; 
calyx oblong, taper-pointed, clothed with shaggy hairs. 0.- Native of 
Spaiiu^Bractes nearly sessile, ovately oblong, sometimes thinly toothed ; 
petals lanceolate, narrow, shorter than the sepals, generally toothed, yellow. 

21. H. niliticum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem herbaceous : branches 
erect, or ascending, clothed with short wool, or ash-coloured shaggy hairs ; 
leaves on short footstalks, opposite, oblongly elliptic, clothed with shaggy 
wool : upper ones alternate, opposite to the flowers, all stipulate ; flower- 
stalks erect, clothed with woolly hairs, as is also the taper-pointed 
calyx*©. — Native of Egypt, Barbary, Spain, and the South of FVahce. 

& procfanben*. Stems procumbent, ascending, clothed with woolly 
hairs, somewhat hoary, leaves woolly on both sides, particularly under- 
neath.©. — Native of the South of France, and, probably, a distinct species ? 

22. H. intermedium (DC. prodr. 1. p. 272.) Stem branching, erect, 
or spreading and ascendant, clothed with ash-coloured shaggy hairs ; leaves 
stipulate,petiolate,obovately oblong, bluntish,slightlytoothed,veined,thinly 
woolly;, stipules, linearly oblong, the upper ones scarcely twice the length 
of the footstalks ; flower-stalks nearly opposite to the leaves, and, with the 
calyx, clothed with ash-coloured shaggy hairs ; calyx oblong.©.— Native 
of Spain. — Cittu* ialictfolius. Cavan. ic n. 156. 1. 144.— Plant a span 

b2 



xii CISTINEX* 

high, somewhat ash-coloured ; floral leaves or bractes .aJkeroata* Jijttatly 
oblong, often petiolate, 1-2-stipuled, sometimes solitary, entire, or. jagged* 
oftentimes shorter than the flower-stalks. 

23. H. denticuldtum (Pers, syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem branching, . tpnght, 
or spreading : branches erect, or ascending, clothed with minute woolly 
pubescence, the points. ash-coloured ; leaves on short footstalks obovately 
oblong, somewhat pointed, more or less toothed with short teeth, woolly, 
green on the upper side, underneath hoary ; stipules, linear, the upper ones, 
about half the length of the leaves; flower-stalks and calyx opposite to 
the bractes ; bractes alternate, more or less jagged.©. — Native of the South 
of France*— Bractes somewhat ovate, often jagged, sessile,, without sti- 
pules ; calyx before flowering hoary on the outside. 

24. H.sangvineum (DC. prodr, p. 273.) Stem herbaceous, jri^,(*im- 
son, clothed with a viscid pubescence; leaves on fctostalks, opposite* ovate, 
blunt, roughish; lower ones without stipules, and crimson jundferjneatha: 
upper ones stipulate; stipules oblong-linear, obtuse, petiolate, scarcely 
shorter than the leaves ; flower-stalks clothed with viscid hairs, axillary, 
or opposite to a leaf, when in fruit, bent backwards.©. — Native of Spain. 
— Leaves alt opposite ; flower-stalks always axillary, and opposite to the 
leaves ; sepals striated on the inner side. » 

45. H. agyptiacum (Mill. diet. n. 23.) Stem herbaceous, pubeeceat, 
erect, or ascending ; leaves on short footstalks, opposite, linearly obl+ag, 
narrow, bluntish, margins rolled back : underneath pale ash-colour : upper 
ones alternate, stipulate ; stipules linearly subulate ; flower-stalks very «ton~. 
der , pubescent, opposite to the upper leaves ; calyx owately oblong, infla- 
ted, including the petals.©— Native of Egypt, Barbary, and Spain* Cis* 
tus ftgyptiacus. Jacq. obs. 3. p. 17. t. 68.— Flower-stalks thickened up- 
wards, sometimes opposite to the short linear bractes ; outer sepals narrow, 
short : inner ones 4-nerved, the nerves fringed ; petals lanceolate, very short. 

We have frequently raised plants from seeds of the different annual 
spfecies that compose the above Section, but have not met with any of them 
sintje we commenced the present work. 

Sebt. VI. Eriocarpum. Supra folio 108. 

'26. Hi Uppii (Pers. syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem suffrutescent, ereot, pubesr* 
cent, whitish, somewhat bifid, or forked ; leaves opposite and alternate, 
on snort footstalks, elliptically lanceolate, or linearly oblong, blunt, rough- 
ish, glaucgscent, underneath clothed with a white hoariness ; stipules nar- 
row, erect, length of the footstalk ; racemes short ; flowers sessile, crowded, 
bracteate at the base ; bractes very minute.??.— Native of Egypt.*— Sepals 

Cubescent : inner ones 4-5-ribbed, obtuse ; petals ovate, yellow, scarcely 
mger than the calyx ; stamens about 10, shorter than the petals. 

27. it. tessiliflorum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem suffrutescent, erect* 
very much branched ; branches pubescent ; leaves opposite and alternate, 
linear, the margins somewhat rolled back, clothed with a short ash-coloured 
tortlfcntum ; stipules small, linear; racemes short; flowers sessile; bractes 
mitrtite.^.— Native of dry hills, in the North of Africa.— Ciatus setsiU* 
flonte. tXesf. fl. atl. 1. p. 418. 1. 107.— Sepals pubescent, inner ones ob- 
tuse; "petals yellow, a little longer than the calyx. 

28. H. rufiebmum (Spreng. syst. 2. p. 589.) Stem suffrutescent, thickly 
clothed with canescent starry fascicles of hairs ; leaves on short footstalks : 
lower ones elliptic, obtuse, flat : upper ones narrower, linear* or oblong, 
margins somewhat revolute, all clothed underneath with starry bunches of 



CISTINEjB. xiii 

haitsystipuiate ; flowers approximate, racemose ; calyx very bristly, brown- 
ish ; .petals yellow. 1* .—Native of the North of Africa. — Cistus ruficpmua. 
Viviani floras libycae, spec. p. 27. 1. 14. f. 5. 

». H. lanuginbiutn (Spreng. syst. 2. p. 580.) Stem sufffutescent, 
branching ; the whole plant clothed with soft canescent hairs ; leaves op- 
posite, on short footstalks, elliptic, densely woolly : floral ones sessile, lan- 
ceolate, alternate, stipulate ; flowers in a raceme, all facing to one side, 
somewhat ireflexed before their expansion ; three inner sepals ovately lan- 
ceolate, 3-nerved : the two outer ones linearly lanceolate, all about. equal 
in length ; petals yellow, about equal with the calyx ; capsule triquetrous^* 
— iNattve of the North of Africa.— Cistus lanugirioaus. Viv. fl. lib. sp. 
p. 28. t.l4.f.3. 

80. H.nticttsKrAttm (Spreng. syst.2. p.688.) Stem suffrutescent,clothed 
with starry blanches of burs ; leaves linear, obtuse, clothed with bunches 
of atanry hairs : lower ones on short footstalks, opposite, nearly all flat ; 
upper 'ones attentate, with revolute margins : floral ones sessile,, linear, 
acute: stipules linearly lanceolate, a little longer than the footstalks ; flowers 
racemose, distant; sepals large, 3-5-nerved, ovate, acute, longer than the 
petals ; petals elliptic, the length of the stamens. % . — Native of the North, 
of Africa. — Cistus micranthus. Viv. fl. lib. p. 28. 1. 14. f. 4.— Petals simi- 
lar to H. tnmfanwwi, yellow. 

81. H. Kdktrieum (Delil. fl. eg. 93. t. 81. f. fc) Stem very much 
brooked, twisted at the base ; branches ascending ; lower leaves opposite,, 
theothers alternate, obovate, margins rolled back, hoary, underneath nerve*}*, 
stipulate ; racemes with the flowers facing to one side ; flowers on sjbotf foot- 
stalk* : the flower-stalks and calyx villosely hairy ; sepals .acute ; capsules 
oMong, villosely hairy. %. — Native of Egypt. Petals connected at the 
point*. 

82. H. estt/Brftcm (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 274.) Stem suffirutesoeat, 
branching, naked at the base : branches clothed with short ash-coloured, 
wool % leaves lanceoiately elliptic, bluntish , clothed on both sides with short 
wool : the upper side greenish, underneath hoary ; stipules linear, small ; 
racemes small, the flowers facing to one side, terminal, or opposite to a leaf ; 
flowers crowded, nearly sessile ; calyx hairy, inner sepals acute* %* — Na- 
tive of the Island of Teneriffe. 

• 88. H. c**arttn*e (WiMd. enum. 871.) Stem suffratescent, procum- 
bent ; branches somewhat woolly, of a whitish ash-colour ; leaves on foot- 
stalks, opposite and alternate, somewhat ovately elliptic, blunt, clothed 
with short wool on both sides, glaucous, underneath of a white ash-colour; 
stipules awl-shaped, shorter than the footstalks; racemes terminal, erect; 
bractas minute ; flowers on short stalks, that are clothed with hoary wool. % , 
—Native of the Canary Islands.— Cistus canadensis. Jacq- ic. 1. 1, 87* — 
Calyx glaucous : inner sepals ovate, bluntish. 

84. fl. wwcroMdtwm (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 274.) Stem somewhat; 
erect, spreading : branches woolly, intermixed with hairs, hoary ; leaves on 
footstalks, ovate-elliptic, bellied, mucron ate : the upper side green, roughish, 
clothed with bunches of starry hairs : underneath clothed with hoary wool ; 
stipules awl-shaped, hairy, shorter than the footstalks; racemes mostly ter- 
minal; flowers on short footstalks, clothed with wool and hairs intermixed. 1* . 
—Native of Teneriffe.— Calyx clothed with silky hairs; sepals broadly, 
ovate, bluntish. 

8*. BL dktikkkm (DC. ptodr. 1. p. 384.) Stem aufirutescent, stipu- 



my CISTTNEJE. 

late, erect ; leaves opposite, oval-oblong, hoary ; racemes terminal, leafy, 
2*parted ; flowers opposite to the leaves. 1* . —Native of Portugal. 

. Sect* VII. Fumana. Supra fol. 16. 

36. H. eHandes (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 274.) Stem frutescentt 
erect; leaves alternate, imbricate, semi-cylindrical, short, smootbish, with- 
out stipules ; flower-stalks solitary, 1-flowered, opposite to a leaf, or ter- 
minal, longer than the leaves ; capsules, when open, naked. % .—Cistus eru» 
coides. Cavan. ic 2. p. 66. L 172. — Leaves somewhat revelute at the 
margin. 

or gi&rum. Branches and flower-stalks smooth.1>. —Native of Spain 
pubescems. Upper part of the branches and flower-stalks pubescent V- 
— Native of Naples. 

• 37. H. tceve (Pers. syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem suffrutescent, nearly upright, 
smooth, branching: branchesupright; leaves opposite, sessile, linear, smooth, 
nevolnie at the margin,' keeled : upper ones alternate, stipulate ; stipules 
bug* subulate ; flower-stalks solitary, 1-flowered, nearly terminal ; calyx 
smooth.!?.*- Native of hills, in Spain. —Cistus laevis. Cavan. ic. 2. p. 36. 
t.l46vf. 1. 

38. H. viride (Tenor, prodr. fl. neap, p. 81.) Stem suffrutescent, as* 
oending, smooth ; leaves opposite, linear, revolute at the margins, green, 
smooth, somewhat mucronate, stipulate; stipules subulate, much smaller 
than- the leaves ; flowers in racemes : the flower-stalks and calyx villous and 
dammy.^.— Native of Sicily. — Tenore fl. neap. v. 1. 1. 47. 

• 8& BE. juniperHum, (DC. prodr. 1. p. 276.) Stem suffrutescent, as- 
cending, branched ; leaves opposite, linearly awl-shaped, fringed, nwcro- 
nate, flat, or the margin somewhat revolute : upper ones alternate 5 stipules 
subulate, the upper ones longest ; flowers in a raoenie : the flower-stalks 
and calyx villous and clammy. ^.—Native of the South of France, Italy, 
and Barbary-^- Barrel, ic t. 443.— Bractes solitary and linear. 

40. H. BarrelUri (Tenor, prodr. fl. neap. p. 31.) Stem suffrutescent, 
erect : branches clothed with shaggy down ; leaves opposite, linearly ob- 
long,' attenuated- to the base, narrow, pubescent, revolute at the margin, 
and fringed t upper ones alternate ; stipules linearly subulate, erect, mu- 
cronate; taoemes few-flowered ; flower-stalks and calyx villous and clam- 
my. ffr»~*Nattve<of Italy, and Spain. — Barrel, ic. rar. t. 416. —Flowers 
yellow; 

"* 41. H. ty'rtioum (Sprang, syst. 2. p. 593.) Suffrutescent, hairy: 
branches spreading, clothed with close-pressed white hairs ; leaves nearly 
sessile, opposite, cattish,; the margins revolute, linearly elliptical, clothed 
with scattered hsire, underneath hoary : upper ones linear and more acute ; 
stipules leaf*uke* but not above half the size : the upper ones equal with 
the leaves; flowers in a short raeeme, all facing to one side ; sepals 6, very 
bristly: inner ones roundly ovate, 5-nerved : outer ones round, very short, fc. 
^-Native of 'the North of Africa. — Cistus syrticus. Vivian, fl. lib. p. 27. 
1. 14. f. 2.— Flowers violet? 

- Sect. VIII. Pbotdocistus. Supra fol % 

• 42. Hi pilomUMda (DC. prodr. 1. p. 284.) Suffrutescent; stipules none; 
leaves elongately elliptic, blunt, on long footstalks, the upper side green, 
underneath clothed with short hoary wool : both sides covered with long 
villous hairs, which are longest on the under side ;. flowers in panicles.^. 



CISTINEiE. xv 

— Native o£ the Pyrenees, on sunny roeks : flowers yellow.— Cistus pito- 
selloides. Lapeyrouse. 

43. H. tnolie (Pers. syn. 2. p. 76.) Stem suffrutescent : branches gene- 
rally simple* clothed with, long hairs ; leaves roundish, ovate, blunt, petio- 
late, clothed on both sides with soft woolly hair ; racemes simple, and, with 
the oalyx, clothed with ash-coloured woolly hairs. 1*. — Native of Spain.w 
Oistus mollis. Cavan. ic. 8. p. 32. t. 262. f. 2.— Braetes subulate, minute, 
clothed with woolly hairs, ash-coloured ; flowers yellow. 

44. H. origanifoHum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 76.) Stem suffruticose, 2*8*- 
fcrked ; leaves on foot-stalks, ovate, hairy on both sides' ; racemes short, 
terminal; petals scarcely longer than the calyx. f*.— Native of Spain. — 
Cistus origanifolius. Cavan. ic. 3. p. 31. t. 262. f. 1. — Calyx oblong ; pe- 
tals yellow, not above half the size of H. molli. 

45. H.dichotomuvt (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 276.) Stem saffira* 
tesceot: branches forked, smoothish ; leaves minute, ovate, acute, smooth* 
on short footstalks, the margin re volute ; racemes slender, few-flowered: ip. 
Native of Spain. — Cistus diehotomus. Cavan. ic. 3. p. 32. t. 263. f. 1,-* 
Flowers small, deep yellow, scarcely so large as the flowers of Sportful* 
iwdom ; leaves small, resembling Thymus piperella. 

46. H. penicilldtum (DC. prodr. 1. p. 277.) Stem sa&uteseant': 
branches procumbent, clothed with long bristly hairs ; leaves green, clothed 
with bristly hairs on the nerves and margins on both sides : lower ones on 
footstalks, ovate, smallest: upper ones linearly oblong, nearly sessile; ra- 
cemes simple, and with the calyx bristly; flowers mmute.lj*.— Native of 
Spain, and the Sooth of France. 

47. H. otxwdtum (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p» 277.) Stem satfnrtesoene: 
branches spreading, somewhat forked, the points covered with short .aton*- 
coloured wool; leaves obovate, or oblong, brunt, green on both sides, 
fringed, and clothed with short hairs : lower ones minute \ racemes simple, 
few-flowered : calyx ash-coloured, hairy. 1*. —Native of Spain, near Aran- 
jnez.— Leaves on short footstalks. 

48. H;k6lic*m (Pers. syn. 2. p. 76.) Stem suffrutescent: branoheiB 
simple, erect, long, and slender, clothed with woolly hairs; leaves clothed 
with bristly hairs, the hairs strigose, and pressed fiat to the leaf: lower ones 
ovate and smallest: upper ones lanceolate, oblong, or oblongiydinea* ; /ra- 
cemes simple, and, with the calyx, clothed with bristly hairs, hoary. %.— 
Native of dry places near the Mediterranean. — Cistus ntalichm. Linn; 
Spec. 740. Barr. rar. ic 10. 610. t. 366. 

49. H. Sfrrra (Cambessedes- mem. mus. v. 14. p. 216; pi. 20 Stan 
short, erect, suffrutescent, branching; leaves opposite, without stipulesVon 
short footstalks, somewhat cordately ovate, succulent, smooth, glauoojus; 
racemes short, somewhat corymbose; germen 3-celled; style crooked. at 
die base ; stigma thickened. 1^. — Native of the Balearic. Islands; in sands, 
by the sea side, in the large Island between Palmam and Prat^ Nearly 
related to H. marifofium. '- » . ; i 

50. H. marifdlium (DC. fl. fr. 4. p. 817.) Stem suffrutescent, procum- 
bent ; leaves without stipules, petiolate, ovately cordate, dr ovate, some- 
what acute, upper side green and hairy, underneath hoary ; racemes ter- 
minal, solitary, simple, few-flowered.lj.--* Native of Italy, Spain, and the 
South of France. — Cistus marifolins. Linn. spec. 741. » not of English Bo- 
tany.— Barrel, rar. ic. 521. t. 441.— Garyx. ovatesy"obIang»~*W*< only 
know this plant, by Barretter's figure, and a specimen of it in Mr. Lam- 
bert's herbarium ; it is not the least like the British plant, figured by this 



xvi CISTINE2E. 



*»,Eagliih. Betsey, ead eoasiitered aa each ia the gafdane; vie denot 
believe the present species is in any collection in this country , at preaattfc 

61. H* iiiJanetyiainii (Dnmd in DC. prodr, 1. p. 277.) Stem eutra- 
tesoeat, braachingfrom the base : branches simple, generally decumbent at 
the<hasey clashed with a hoary tomeatum; leaves on short footstalks : the 
uppecaideof agmacoaoant gi^on, underneath clothed with white wool: lower 
oueaneatiy orfaMnkr, others ovate : theiipperaaesstipulate; stipules small, 
oblong, deciduous ; racemes solitary, or 2 or 3 in a sort of crowded jiaajtiu, 
teaminatiay she brea c h es ; calyx hairy. ly.—Nativ* of Spain, and Barbery. 
—Cistus nmnmnlaans. Cavaa. ic 2. p, 34* i, 142. — flowers yellow. - 

M. H~.rittttamui<Presl. Sarong. syst. 2; p. 691*) Leevesovate, rtmud- 
ish, probtoegt acute : upper siaVdark red, and smooth s under«eath<ctothed : 
with short white wool ; flowers racemed* peadaloas ; calyx hairy. t*.~Na*' 
tiveof Jointly. 

68. H. cnunfeHum (Pen. syn. 2.. p. 77.) Stem suffrateeoent, erect; • 
saioeehisb; -leaves somewhat succulent, on short footstalks: lower ones 
ovate, acate^withont stipules : uoper ones oblongly linear, stipulate? sace*- 
men sheet, in a sort of umbel ; calyx hairy at the: base*^. —Native of Bar** 
bary, and near Valencia, in Spain*— Cistus graucus. Desfi. fl. atl. l.^p. 418* 
bat neiof Cavanilles.-- Leaves on the upper side and at the margins* and 
thoaiiddfr nerve underneath hairy ; footstalks -hairy : haha thinly scattered, 
lnagr, Trhatti 

54. H. paateutttuai (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 27&) Steins 'suffirui 
tesaent» procumbent: aranehea ascending, or erect, flowering ones long, 
bearing stipules on the upper part; leaves on footstalks, ovate, bluatish> or 
ready roundish : upper side green, underneath hoary ; racemes opposite, or 
in threes, panicled*i>«— Native of mountains in Spain and Sicily. —Stipules 
minute* linear, acute; flowers small, yellow. 

65. £L pdydntium (Pern, syn, 2. p. 78.) Stem suffrutesceat, erect, 
hairy; leaves on footstalks : lower, ones smallest, ovate, obtuse, underneath 
clothed with a short white tomentum : the upper ones stipulate, ov*tely>ob-. 
long, or lanceolate, green on both sides, the margins fringed ; stipules lon~ 
geMhaafthe footstalks ; racemes hairy, panicled ■; flower-stalks filifonn, and 
w^th tfceeefyr, imiry.1) *— Native of the North of Africa.— Cistus polyau~ 
the* Desf, ft.aO.1. p.42u. fcl08. 

66; 'B.easeraa»(Perawsyn.2«p 4 76.) Stem sufihitesceat, erect, branch- 
ing* ,brna c h es o ppo s it e, -hoary ; lower Waves without stipules, ovate, acute* 
attenuated instf a sort of footstalk at the base, densely clothed with a sheet 
tomeatum* of a hoary asaveolour? upper ones stipulate ; racemes panicled, 
anttlary, opposite, terminating the branches in threes; calyx bristly .1* * — 
NjaaWof Spam^Cistus cinereua. Cavan. ic. 2. p. 83. 1. 141.— Flowiers 
amatt; petals entire. 
' fa Jmraa rrf akta,. Dfo Sterna slenderer; calyx less bristly. 

57. H. sawanmndJuJu (Pen. syn. 2. p. 7&) Stem saJrrutescent : branches 
lona),.erect* somewhat Hgiumus, Uprousiy silvery ; leaves on footstalks, ob- 
Icaa^iblan^l^ptoaalysilvssy, bearing stipules ; stipules small, sessile, acute, 
aoomiaitiiaa^)cantn>; racemes axillary, solitary, or terminating the braachee 
uMhieee* fawarjsiaaaing to one side ; flewewtalks near each other, brae- 
tents** the befte;.bracteeeooa turning brown ; calyx leprous. T*. — Native 
of tSeaia, 'and. Barbary.— Cistus squanunatns. Cavan. ic. 19*\ Barr. rur. 
ic 1 328. — Plant leprous : braachee 4-sided at the base : scales orbicular, 
" rtbeueata? style longer than the stamens, twisted at the f 



CISTINEiE. avii 

Sect IX. Euheli anthem liM. Supra fol. 7. 

»MJ Hi m et e ls msje >M»W (BG. fl. fr. 4. p. MO.) Stem stfferteseen*, 
erects brancfci(ig^t>reeeh*s long, round, hoary; leaves oblong-linear, reve*** 
lufetat the margin, underneath clothed with ahoarytomentem: young dues 
hoary on bcth sides; stipule* and bractes linear, acute, fringed; racemes v 
1 to 3, terminal ; flowers close together; calyx glaucous, sepals fringed : « 
outer enes minute, after flowering renewed : inner ones 2-nerved, oblique, 
acute. I?. — Native of the South of France, Spain, and Barbery— Barrel. 

/ spates*** Leaved some w hat flatter, of a greyish green on the upper • 
side.l* .-^-Native of Syria.— Cistus syriacus. Jaoq. ic. Tar. t. 96. 

y TVuhmkti (Pfers. syn„6. p. 79.) Stent suffruteseeut, stipulate, Woolly; 
leave* linear, their margins revolute ; flowers racemose, ciliated with gUm- ' 
dular hairs ; sepak oblique, somewhat Raided ; outer ones lanceolate, re- > 
flexed. 1*. — Native of Corsica. —Cistus racemosus. Cavan. io. 2. p. 38. 
1. 140* is the same plant after flowering. DC. 

50. H. BroHHtmtoU (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 279.) Stem shrubby, 
branching : branches opposite ; leaves on short footstalks, flat, oblong-Ian* 
ceonte, blunt, woolly on both sides, underneath hoary, upper side of a > 
greyish green ; stipules and bractes deciduous, linear, somewhat woolly ; ' ' 
raeemee short, branching ; flowers facing to one side ; calyx oblong, acute' i* 
inner sapak 4~nerved, somewhat woolly, yellowish. I?;— Native of Teneriffe: > 
— Style double the length of the stamens, nearly erect; stipules somewhat- 
falcate ; flowers yellow. 

OOl tt. 8t*ehadif&li&j» (Pers, :sy». 2. p. 79.) Stem erect : branches' 
clothed with hoary tomentatm ; leaves oblong-linear, bfeintisb, . both aides-' 
somewhat woolly : the upper side of a greenish asrj»ceeaur 3 underneath* 
beery, with the margins revolute; stipules somewhat villous, lieenjty 4eto>t 
ceolate ; racemes before flowering revolute ; flowers close together ; calyx* 
villous, outer sepals green and fringed, inner ones taper-pointed, boary.f>. 
--Watt** of Portugal and Corska.— Cistus staei^wdifohus. Brot. fl. lusiUS. ' 
p. flWw^Toia stmeieft is in the collection at the Chelsea BomaifttGeJdeev • 
but nee net yet flowered. 

fflj H. wuditoMe (Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p, 279.) «vsm shrubby , 
bresWtint;: breaches smooth below : above clothed with hoary viHoue wool; 
leaves oblong-lanceolate, margins revolute, both sides tomentose : under*- 
neath hoary: above greenish yellow ; stipules linear, longer than, (be fbot- 
statlm; eaiyx deepryfurrewed, scarcely pnbescest, thynerqsa e l eva te d* and g ■ 
Inssrelfjv-^ Native of the mountains of Valeatia, in Bpami^PeflsdsyeikfWi't 
' 6a. H. aewwinitum ( Pers. syn. 2. p. 79.) branch** erect, base<<aaoV 
point hairy, naked between ; leaves on long footstalks, oblong, the margins • 
revolute, green on both sides, hairy: underneath somewhat woolly; stipules/ 
smoothish, linear, longer than the footstalks; racemes few flowered, Jodsev 
somewhat hairy ; calyx smooth and gmaty , transparent.** ,-*Native of fields 
in Nice.— Petals yellow. - »* 

m. H. o usrest I Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p,280,> StenueiisTrtiteiteaiv * 
procumbent, very njnch branched : branches villous ; teemsrtUiutttaety !«*>« ; 
ceoiate, tapering into a footstalk at the base, bloeiish, otr both sides vil- 
losety silky, fringed j stipules a little longer than theifoetetaik*,' vtffcosevy 
fringed ; flower-stalks 1 to 3- flowered, terminal, calyx somewhat villoma.*. » 
—Native of the mountains of .Geneva.— Cistus ovatus. Viri fragm. 1. p.0;< 
t. ew f..2. Hairs white, silky ; flowers yellowi - 

64. H mddnm (Hem. cat. fe hem. 498.) Suflruteaeaafc, p wembeut, • 



xviit CIBflNEJE. 

stipulate; leaves oval, green, glossy, revolute at the margins.^. -^Flowers 
yellow.— This plant is also in the Botanic Garden at Chelsea, but it has 
not yet flowered. 

65. EL angustifdiium (Pers. syn. 2. p. 79.) Stem suffmteseentjdiffroely 
spreading : branches somewhat woolly, ash-coloured ; leaves on short foot*- 
stalks : upper ones linearly oblong, somewhat acute, margins revolute, un- 
derneath clothed with a hairy tomentum ; upper side somewhat bristly ; sti- 
pules hairy, longer than the footstalks ; racemes loose ; calyx pubescent 
and more or less hairy, the hairs deciduous.^.— Native not known. — Ci*- 
tus angustifolius. Jacq. vind.3. p. 53.— Petals narrow at the base, not im- 
bricate at the margins, yellow. 

66. H.obtusifolium (Dunal in DC. prodr. J. p. 281.) Stems suffru*- 
tescent : branches tomentosely hoary ; leaves small, petiolate, linearly ob- 
long, obtuse, margins revolute : underneath clothed with a hoary tomen- 
tum : upper side green, covered with white scattered hairs ; stipules green, 
oblongly linear, flat, blunt, scarcely fringed, the length of the footstalks; 
calyx bristly. 1*. — Native of the Island of Cyprus. 

67. H. LogAtem (Dunal in DC. prodr. v. 1. p. 281.) Branches ascend- 
ing, tomentosely hairy, hoary ; leaves linear, blunt, very much revolute at 
the margins, nearly round, somewhat hairy, green ; stipules flat, scarcely 
hairy, double the length of the footstalks ; footstalks bristly, white ; calyx 
glossy, nerved and furrowed ; nerves fringed with white hairs, ft .—Native of 
Spain.— Leaves short; calyx small; petals yellow. 

68. H. violdceum (Pers. syn. 2. p. 78.) Stem erect or ascending, very 
much branched, the branches opposite: small branches slender, clothed 
with white wool, and hairs intermixed ; leaves small, linear, or spathulately 
linear, obtuse, margins revolute, more or less woolly on both sides> under- 
neath hoary ; stipules minute, hairy ; racemes loose, few-flowered ; calyx 
smooth, violaceus, nervosely-furrowed.'h. — Native of Spain. — Cistus vio- 
laceus. Cavan. ic. 2. p. 88. 1. 147. — Petals white. 

69. H; ficrmbswm. Stem suffruticose, erect, branching : branohos to- 
mentosely hoary ; leaves on short footstalks, linear or lanceoktely linear, 
margins revolute, hoary on both sides, powdered; stipules subulate, longer 
than the footstalks ; calyx powdered and clothed with very short hairs. ft . — 
Native of Spain.— H. racemosum 0. farindtum. DC. prodr. 1. p. $81.— 
Flowers white. 

70. H. rtric tw m (Pen. syn. 2. p. 79.) Stem sunrutescent, erect,, very 
much branched ; branches straight, clothed with white tosneatum; leaves 
nearly sessile, very marrow, linearly subulate, hoary, the margins revolute ; 
stipules linear, setose ; calyx nervosely striated, pale yellow, nearly smooth. 
V — Native of Spain. — Cistus stratus. Cavan. ic. 8. p* 82. t. 268. f. 2.— 
Petals white. 

71. B..khpid*m (Dnnal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 282.) Stem suffruteseent, 
branching : branches ascending, tomentosely hoary ; leaves on footstalks, 
oblong, obtuse, slightly mucronate, margins revolute, underneath hoary, 
the upper side roughish,of a bluiih green or glaucescent; calyx clothed with 
long spreading hairs, f*. — Native of the South of France.— Cistus hispidus. 
Lam. diet. 2. p% 26. — Petals white. 

72. H.foetidvm (Pern, syn, 2. p. 79.) Stem suffruteseent, procumbent, 
clothed with long hairs ; leaves oblong, green on both sides, reughish, hairy ; 
stipules linear, hairy, longer than the footstalks ; flower-stalks and calyx 
somewhat hairy. 1*, — Native not known.— Cistus fetidus, Jacq. ic. rar. 1. 
1 98.-~Bryony~s*ented ; flowers white. 



CISTIN££. xix 

. . . 74. H. ei&fo»ft.(Pers. syn, 2* p. 79.) Stem guffrutesceat,decaii*b©!*t : 
brtwcbe4;clQthed with a white- toinentum ; leaves ovately lanceolate or lan- 
oeolately oblong, margins slightly revolute, underneath clothed with white 
toinjftttim#theuyg>6r side hairy; stipules greenish, longer than the footstalks; 
oalyx membranaceous;; inner sepals nerved and furrowed ; nerves elevated, 
glandularly hairy, tj.— Native of Spain, Italy, and the North of Africa.**- 
GjstuAeiliatua. X>esf. fUatl, 1. p. 421. 1. 109. — Petals rose-coloured. 
. 74. H..&»erwm (DC. prodr. 1. p. 283.) Stem suffrutescent* branch- 
ing : branches long* ascending, or more or less erect, somewhat tomentose* 
wughish, ash-coloured ; leaves on footstalks, oblong, taper-pointed, mar- 
gins revolute, underneath clothed with short white wool, the upper side 
green, somewhat woolly, roughish, setose at the point; stipules awl-shaped, 
bristle-pointed ; angles of the calyx clothed with bristly hairs, the hairs long 
and numerous,^. — Native of Spain. — Petals white. 

0. JZouttai (DC. loc. cit.) Stem, leaves and calyx very hairy, hairs 
white, f?. -—Native of the Levant. Rousseau. 

75. H. majoranafdUum (DC. prodr. 1. p. 283.) SufTratescent, erect, 
Yery much branched : branches hairy, and clothed with white wool ; leaves 
on footstalks, ovately oblong, somewhat pointed, margins revolute, under- 
neath clothed with a white tomeittum, the upper side of a bluish green, 
tomentoseiy hairy ; stipules subulate, bristle-pointed ; calyx very hairy, the 
hairs white. I*. — Native of the South of France. — Petals white. 

76. H. hiratium (DC. prodr. 1. p. 284.) Suffrutescent, stipulate, hairy; 
leaves on footstalks, white underneath : lower ones rounded : tipper ones 
lanceolate, acute ; flowers in a terminal raceme, generally facing all to one 
side.1? .—Native of rocky mouD tains on the Eastern Pyrenees^Oistus hir- 
sutufl, Lapeyrouse abr. 803.— Flowers large, white. 

* Doubtful Species. 
77* H. oHgopkt/ttum (DC. prodr. 1. p. 284.) Frutescent, stipulate; 
leaves on footstalks, ovately lanceolate, nerveless, entire at the margins, 
rough, the margins revolute; flower-stems 1 flowered. J?-—* Native near 
Jaffa; petals yellow. 



HUBSONIA. Supra folio 36. ' \ 

1. H. NuttdlM. Equally pubescent; stem erect, much branched,' leaves 
about 2 lines long, Aliform, somewhat imbricate, but distinct from the stem, 
flower-stalks lateral, crowded, when in fruit from 5 to 8 lines long; catyx 
cylindrical, obtuse, and as well as the leaves clothed with an equal quan- 
tity of pubescence : segments oblique and convolute, the 2 smaller ones 
scarcely visible in the fruiting calyx, sufficiently distinct in the unexpended 
flowers ; capsule cylindric-oblong, externally pubescent ^ always 1 1 -seeded ; 
valves oblong, the central suture obsolete.tr . — Abundant over the barren 
sandy woods of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, (Nwttalh) 
H. erieoides. Nuttall. gen. and spec. amer. 2. p. 4. scarcely of others ; his 
description at any rate does not agree with any that we have examined; ] 

2. H. mont&na (Nutt. gen. amer. 2. p. 5.) Old plants partly smooth, 
tufted ; stems 3 to 5 inches long, decumbent $ leaves about a line longer than 
those of the preceding species, nearly smooth, filiform, subnSate/somewnat 
imbricate; nower-stalks terminal, solitary, about an inch long when' in 
fruit ; flowers more than twice the size of the preceding ; calyx bell*shaped, 
woolly : segments taper-pointed, smaller ones longer and subulate, Coft- 



xx CISTINE*). 

spicuously exserted and distinct ; stamens 25 to 30 ; capsule villous, gene* 
rally 3-seeded, 3 times the size of the other : valves ovate, partly septife- 
rous ; seeds granulate, somewhat angular, f? .—Native of the summit of the 
highest mountains of North Carolina, abundant on the romantic summit of 
the Table-rock, a singularly elevated and isolated portion of the Catawba 
ridge. Nut tall.— Flowers as in all the species yellow. 

3. H. austrdlis (Spreng. syst. 2. p. 452.) Smoothish, erect ; leaves li- 
nearly lanceolate, underneath clothed with scattered spreading hairs ; flow- 
ers terminal, solitary, peduncled, calyx taper-pointea, somewhat hairy. %• 
—Native of Monte Video. Selh. 



LECH E A. Calyx 3-sepalus bracteis sepalisve exter. duobns exterio- 
ribus stipatus. Petala 3, lanceolate. Stamina 3-12, saepius numero terna- 
ria. Ovarium 1 sub-trigonum. Stigmata 3, vix distincta. Captula 8-valvw 
medio septi aut nerviferis; semina septo nervove adfixa paucissima saepius 8; 
albumen carnosum. Embryo dorsalis rectiusculus, radicula infera : cofv/e- 
dmibus ovato-oblongis. — Herbae (Boreali- Americans) incomptce; floribua. 
ttUmerosis parvis ; ramis injimis afloriferi* stepe diver sis. D C . prodr. 1 . p. 285* 
1. L. villasd (Elliott sketch. 184.) All over hairy ; leaves oblongry lan- 
ceolate, niucronate ; panicle pyramidal, leafy : branches flowering at the 
points ; flowers crowded in a sort of raceme, facing all to one side, on abort 
flower-stalks, V- . — Native of North America, from Canada to Florida. L. ma- 
jor. Pursh fl. amer. 1. p. 90. non Linn.— L. minor. Lin. — Lam. ill. t 52. f. 2. 

? mucronhta (Rat. prec. 37.) Hairy ; stem erect, simple ; raceme com- 
pound ; flowers bracteolate. a/. . —Native of woods, in New Jersey. 

2. L. mtnor (Pursh fl. amer. 1. p. 91.) Smoothish, leaves linearly Ian- ' 
ceolate, acute ; panicle leafy ; branches elongated, all over covered with 
flowers ; flowers on short flower-stalks ; stem assurgent. V . — Native of hills 
from Canada to Pensylvania.— Lam. ill. t. 52. f. 1. 

3. L. ractmulota (Mich. fl. bor. am. 1. p. 77.) All over clothed with 
close-pressed pubescence ; leaves linear, acute, fringed ; panicle slender, 
very much branched, pyramidal; racemes naked ; flowers small, alternate, 
pedicelled; stem erect. V.— Native of New Jersey to Carolina. Pursh A. 
amer. 1. p. 91. -G aura Lam. HI. t.281. f. 3. 

4. L. thymifblia (Mich. fl. bor. am. 1. p. 77.) All over clothed with 
close-pressed white woolly down ; leaves linear, acute ; panicle leafy, elon- 
gated : branches short ; flowers in close clusters, lateral and terminal ; 
lower-stalks very short ; flowers small, clothed with white wool ; stem up- 
right.^. — Native of woods from Virginia to Carolina. — Lower branches 
creeping, similar to Thymus Serpyllum, from Pursh. fl. amer. sept. 1. p.91. 

5. L. tenuifblia (Mich. fl. bor. am. 1. p. 77.) Covered all over with 
scattered hairs ; leaves very narrow ; panicle spreading, somewhat naked : 
branches alternate; flower-stalks elongated, spreading; stem erect. V. — 
Native of dry gravelly hills from Virginia to Georgia. Pursh. -Leaves on 
the lower branches linear. 

6? L. verticill&ta (Willd. spec. 1. p. 495.) Stem bristly; leaves ob- 
longly ovate, serrulate; flowers whorled. ^ . — Native of the East Indies. 
H abit of Spermacoce. — Most probably not belonging to this genus, or natu- 
ral order. 



SYSTEMATICAL INDEX. 



CISTUS. pl. 

1 vaginatua .«, 9 

3 candidtoimns 8 

SMbidns 81 

4 rofandiffitios 75 

5 villosoa 85 

6 nndnktais 68 

7 incanns 44 

8 cax&cena 45 

criapns 22 

10 heterophyHos 6 

Ucvtltau ..112 

12 purpureas. ••* 17 

18 cymdsus 90 

14 pervifldras 14 

15 fcrtifoliiii 15 

lOfwpaJiffllbu 28 

17 aaperifilius 87 

18 Cupanianns 70 

19 oblongtfolius 07 

SOttros 12 

SI eorbnritntif 8 

SS aciitifoUns 78 

2* satvifoiios 54 

24 obtmdfolius 4S 

25 hirsurtu 19 

SO ptetyaepalaa 47 

27 wilo^paluft 88 

28 florentinus 59 

29 manspeU&nflis 27 

50 Clusii 82 

31 ia*rifcrasa.att<0drttt 84 

82 ladanJferni/3. mtcnlSUus 1 

88 Cyprins .... 89 

84 lauriffilina 52 

MUA'NTHEMUM. 

85 iimli P.Ha turn 5 

36 ocyinota* 13 

87 micropbyTbun 90 

38 algarvtowe 40 

39 cftndidiim 25 

40ngtettm 05 

41 fountain 50 

42 acabrfaua 81 

43 cbeiranthoidea 107 

44 nalimifaUum 4 

45 caoottmiaiiin 99 

40 canadenae SI 

47 braailienae 43 

48 polygalaefolium 11 

49 riomeratum 110 

SOilgtdwn 46 

51 Talpraria 18 

52 eriocaulon 80 

58 pmtctatum 01 

54 lediffitium 41 

55 faUdfolinm 71 

50 efflpticam 108 



PL. 

57 Fwnana 10 

58 procumbent 0& 

59 arabicnm 07 

00 l'ttvipes 24 

61 thymifolium 102 

02 glatinofom 83 

OS eelandicam 85 

64 palchellani 74 

05 alpertre ... S 

66vineale 77 

07 canom 60 

68 crdcenm 53 

69 glancum Ill 

70 leptophylliim 20 

71 serpyfliftliam 60 

72Tulgnre <. 34 

73 ▼algare 0. multiplex 64 

74 sorreianum 28 

75 grandifldrum '60 

76 tauricmn 106 

77 barbatnm 78 

78 nummulariom ••• 80 

79hirtam 10* 

80 Anderadni 89 

81 eriosejMkm 70, 

82 itrmmiDeum 98 

88 stramineani 0. mkUipUx 94 

84 sirtphurenm 87 

85 cuprenm 66 , 

86 Milled 101 

87 hyaaopifoHam a. t f ottom 92 

88 hyttoplftlittm/3.**^«*ro 58 

89 bywopifoUwn y. mkUifUx .... 72 

90 mutabile /3. rtoewm 106 

91 rdseam 38 

92 raseumjS.mfi!tM»fes 80 

93 divernfilium 95 

94diyer8UoUum/3mtff?ta> 98 

95 yenustuin 10 

96 rhodantham 7 

97 caneacent 51 

98 virgitnm 79 

99 vanegatum 38 

100 versicolor 26 

101 racemottim ,....,*,.,...%.. 82 
lOSpUtmni *+ 4* 

103 Wire .,, 48 

104 apennUwun 6S 

105 potifoflnm 88 

106 pulverul«nta» SO 

107 ooofflsam ..-< 91 

108 lanceotttam 100 

109 macrantbon ................ 108 

110 macrantbon £ mtfttpter 104 

HUDSONIA. 

111 ericofdee 86 

US tomentosa ....* 57 

8 G 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



CISTUS. pl. 

acotifolius 78 

albidns 31 „ . . 

asperifolios 87^ glomeratnm 

caadidiMimos S 

canteens 45 

Clttsii 32 

corbarten&U 8/ 

crfticus 112 

4 crispu 22 

Capaniaaus 70 

cyudeos 90 

( C yprius 39 

^flotentioaa 59 

heteropbylliu 

hiitttas 19 

inc&nus 44 

" ladanf fenu a. albifldnu 84 

ladanfferus /3. macutitus 1 

*latiftliiw 15 

-laurifoliua 52 

laxos 12 

moospeliemi* 27 

oWonaifdliiw , 67 Locymofdes 

obtusifolius 42/f oelandicum 

panrifldrtu 14 

platyslpahu 47 

populifolius 23 

psik»6palus 33 

purpureas 17 

rotatodiffilios 75 

talvifoliu 54 



unda&tai 63 

* varinatuB 9 

viUtens %¥ 

HELIA'NTHEMUM. 

algarvense *-- 40 

*alp£*re 2 

s Andendni 89 

^ apenniiram 62 

. ' " arabicum 97 

barb*tam 73 

braetlienae 43 

canadliue ' 21 

candklum 25 

canteens 51 

canom 56 

caratiniamim 99 

chelraathoJdes 107 

confuiam 91 

croeeam 53 

cdpream 66 

divenifoUom 95 

dfrenUoliam/S. mittipfex 98 

efliptScam 108 

erioca iUod 30 

arfoatpata 76 

, fcftmdeom • 50 



PL. 

Frnnana *. . . 16 

glaftcum *. . Ill 

110 

glutindeum 8S 

grandiflorum 69 

^halimifoliam 4 

hirtum 109 

hywopifoUum a. croc&tum 92 

hyssopifoHum /3. ciipreum 58 

hyssopiftllam y. multiplex 72 

Taevipes 24 

lanceolatum 100 

ledifblium 41 

leptophyllnm 20 

lignosum 46 

lineare 48 

macrantbon % 103 

macranthon /3. midtiplex 104 

microphy'Uum 96 

Millen 101 

mutabile 0. rdseum 106 

numroularinm 80 

18 

85 

pilosura 49 

poltffilium 88 

polygalaefotium . . . .• 11 

proctimbena 68 

pulchellnm 74 

pulverulenturo 29 

paoctatnm 61 

racemosum 82 

rrhodanthmn 7 

roaenm : 55 

rweum 0. multiplex 86 

rugosum 65 

salicifolinm 71 

scabroeum 81 

serpyllifolinm 60 

stramf nenm 93 

stramineum /3. multiplex 94 

sulphOreum 37 

surrejanum 28 

tauricom 105 

thymifolium 102 

Tuberaria 18 

umbeliatum ->-'. .' 5 

variegatom 38 

versicolor 26 

ventistum 10 

▼ineale r „ • 77 

virgatum 79 

▼ntgare - . : 34 

▼ulaare fi. mkUipUx 64 

HUDSONIA. 

ericoides 36 

tomentdaa 57 



ALPHABETICAL ENGLISH INDEX. 



HUDSONIA. pl. 

Heath-like 36 

Tomentose 57 

ROCK ROSE. 

Acute-leaved 78 

Blunt-leaved Cretan 42 

Broad-leaved 15 

Broad-sepaled 47 

Broad wave-leaved 12 

Canary Island 3 

Clusius's 32 

Common gum 39 

Cretan 112 

Curled-leaved , 22 

Cyme-flowered 90 

Florentine 59 

Hairy 19 

Heart-leaved 70 

Hoary 43 

Laurel-leaved 52 

Montpelier 27 

Mountain 8 

Narrow-leaved hoary 45 

Oblong-leaved 67 

Oblong sheathed-leaved 9 

Poplar-leaved 23 

Purple-flowered 17 

Rough-leaved 87 

Round-leaved 75 

Sage-leaved 54 

Small-flowered 14 

Smooth sepaled 43 

Spotted-flowered flat-leaved gum . . 1 

Various-leaved 6 

Villous 35 

Wave-leaved 63 

White-flowered flat-leaved gum . . 84 

White-leaved 31 

SUN ROSE. 

Algarvian 40 

Alpine 2 

Apennine 62 

Arabian 97 

Basil-like 13 

Bearded 73 

Beautiful 50 

Brasflian 44 

Bristly-calyxed 109 

Canada 21 

Canescent 51 

Carolina 99 

Charming 10 

Clammy 83 

Cluster-flowered 110 

Clnster-leaved 24 

Common 34 

Common doable yellow 64 

Confused 91 



PL. 

Copper-coloured 66 

Copper-coloured hyssop-leaved .... 58 

Bark rose-coloured 7 

Different-leaved 96 

Dotted-leaved 28 

Double-flowered different-leaved . . 98 

Double-flowered hyssop-leaved .... 72 

Double-flowered rose-coloured .... 86 

Double great-flowered 104 

Elliptic-leaved 108 

Full flowered straw-coloured .... 94 

Glaucous-leaved Ill 

Great-flowered 10S 

Hairy 49 

Hard- wooded 46 

Heath-like 16 

Hoary 56 

Large-flowered 69 

Led urn-leaved 41 

Linear-leaved 48 

Long-racemed 82 

Mr. Anderson's 89 

Mr.Miller's 101 

Milkwort-leaved 11 

Moneywort-leaved 80 

Narrow-leaved 20 

Neat 74 

Pale green-leaved 85 

Plantain-leaved 18 

Powdered 29 

Procumbent 68 

Rote-coloured 55 

Rose-coloured changeable 106 

Rough 81 

Rugged-leaved 65 

Saffron-coloured 63 

Saffron-coloured hyssop-leaved .... 92 

Sea Purslane-leaved 4 

Serpyllura-leaved 60 

Slender trailing 77 

Slender-twigged 79 

Small-leaved 96 

Spear-leaved 100 

Spot-flowered 61 

Stock-like 107 

Straw-coloured 96 

Sulphur-coloured 37 

Tawrian 105 

Thyme-leaved 102 

Umbel-flowered 6 

Variegated-flowered 38 

Various-coloured , . * , 26 

White-leaved 25 

White mountain B8 

Willow-leaved annual * . 71 

Woolly-calyxed 76 

Woolly-stalked 66 



tlLLIH©, PRIIff ER, CHBMBA< 



/ 




/ 





CISTUS vaginatus. 
Oblong-leaved Rock-rose. 



Sect I. £rythrocistus. Supra, folti. 

• Pedunculis unijloris, axiltaritnu vel ierminaHbui, iotitariis, urn- 
tmllaiine : stylo cyti*dri<* ieep& itamknbu* kmgi&re ; stigmato capi- 
tate 6*vJmI*. DC. prodr. 1* p. 204. 



C. t&gbtmt**, foliit oMongoJaBceolatia actttis trinenriis hinntis sub- 
tus reticularis petiolatis, petiolit basi dilatatis margine pilosis sul- 
catis vaginantibns, floribus paniculatis, pedunculis subtrifloris 

• calyclbuaqne hirsnto-tillosis. 

Cfetas taginatus. DC. prodr* 1. p. 266. Jaeq. hort. ickmb. 3« p. 17. 
I. 282. Hort. Kern. 3. p. 304. ed. 2. v. 3. p. 304. WiUden. $p. 
pL 2. p. 1183. Per*, sy*. 2. p. 75. £ote». Jfe^fe*. 226. Spreng. 
sy*t. veg. 2. p. 686. 



Shrubby, erect, branching, clothed with a brown de- 
ciduous bark: branches spreading, ascendant, cylindri- 
cal, thickly clothed with a dense white tomentum, and* 
short viscous hairs intermixed. Leaves opposite, ob- 
longly lanceolate, at first acute, but becoming blunter 
by age, covered on both sides with long white hairs, 
and some smaller ones intermixed; underneath 3- 
nerved, and reticulately veined, upper side of a whitish 
green, underside yellowish. Petioles short, channelled 
on the upper side, knd rounded on the lower, with a 
furrow on each side, dilated and connected at the base, 
sheathing the stem, viscous, and clothed with unequal 
hairs. Flowers large, jpanicled, of a light rose colour. 
Bractes sessile, clasping the stem, lower ones leaf-like, 
oblongly lanceolate, acute, upper ones small, oblongly 
ovate. Peduncles generally 3-flowered, clothed with 
soft down, and longer spreading hairs. Pedicles cylin- 
drical, a little nodding, slightly viscous. Sepals 5, 
papillose, hairy, the 2 outer on& scarcely one third as 
large as the inner ones, oblong-lanceolate, acute, points 

D 



and margins a little reflexed: inner ones cordately 
ovate, concave, terminated by a long subulate point. 
Petals 5, imbricate, obcordate, crumpled, sides undu- 
late and bent inwards, striate, rose-coloured, with a 
yellow spot at the base. Stamens from 130 to 140, 
rather more than half the length of the style : filaments 
slender, smooth, bright yellow : pollen orange-coloured. 
Germen 5-angled, the angles clothed with white silky 
hairs, and smooth between. Style nearly double the 
length of the stamens, smooth, flexuose. Stigma capi- 
tate, slightly 5-furrowed, papillose. 

This fine species is a native of Teneriffe, and is there- 
fore rather too tender to endure our severest winters in 
the open ground without protection ; but it succeeds 
well if protected by a common frame or pit in severe 
frost ; it will also thrive very well against a wall, so as 
to be covered with a mat in frosty weather, and a little 
dry litter placed about its roots ; it is also a very proper 
plant for a Greenhouse or Conservatory, where its 
splendid flowers are seen to great advantage ; it suc- 
ceeds well in any light rich soil, or a mixture of light 
turfy loam, peat, and sand, will suit it very well; 
young cuttings strike root freely, taken off at a joint, 
and planted under hand-glasses in autumn ; it also 
ripens plenty of seeds, by which it is readily increased. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant, received from 
the Nursery of Messrs. Malcolm and Gray, at Ken- 
sington, last summer. 



2 




P 



* ***** '■ ?:*?**& ^^u.&fy ^.j <4fJf, 






£ 



3 



C1STUS candidissimus. 

Canary Island Rock-Rose. 



Sect I. EfcYTMOfOirrus. Stpalm externa angastiora, tape 
minora, interna ba*i concava margine soariota. Petala rosea, rubra 
ant purpurea. Capmlce 5-loculares. 

* Peduncnli* unifhrU, axillaribus aut terminalitnu, toKtariU 
*mbellatist>e ; stylo cylindrico acep£ «f«mt*itiM Ungior*: stigmata 
capitate 6-mkato. DC. prodr. i, p« 9S4. 



C. &mdidwimM9 f folHi OTato-ellipticfti aeutfo dense tementeeo-inea- 
td§ anbtaa retieulatii trinervik breriter petiolatia, petklia baai 
dilatatis margine piloeU yaginantibuA, pedonculis terminaliboa 
uniflorb aut subcymosis, sepalia extends dimidio brevioribus. 

Cistns caadidtssimus. Dunalex DC prodr* 1. p. 204. 



Stem woody, erect, much branched; branch* 
densely clothed with a soft white tomentum, and tqfts 
of very short hairs intermixed. Leaves ovately elliptic, 
acute, clothed on both sides with a dense white tomen- 
tum, reticulately veined underneath ; 3-nerved at the 
base, the margins slightly creuulate, and fringed with 
very short hairs. Petioles short, dilated and joined at 
the base, sheathing the stem, hairy. Peduncles ter- 
minal, often solitary and one-flowered, au<jl shorter than 
the leaves, but sometimes snbqymose and several* 
flowered, reaching beyond the leaves, densely tomen- 
tose with tufts of short hairs intermixed. Bractes 2, 
at the base of the peduncles, leaf-like, lanceolate, 
taper-pointed, longer than the peduncles. Sepals 5, 
tomentose, unequal, the 2 outer ones scarcely half the 
length of the others ; inner ones ovate, concave, mu- 
cronate, with a scariope membranaceous margin on the 
inside, the outer margin naked. Petals 5, of a pale 
rose colour, with yellow unguis, margins slightly ere- 
nulate, distinct or scarcely imbricate at the base, about 



twice the length of the sepals. Stamens about 200 ; 
pollen oraqge coloured. Germen sericeous. Style 
smooth, flexnose, nearly double the length of the 
stamens. Stigma capitate, tuberculate. 

This fine species is a native of the Canary Islands, 
and was introduced to this country about the year 
1815, by the late Professor Christian Smith; by him 
the seeds were given to Mr. William Anderson, 
Curator of the Apothecaries Company's. Garden at 
Chelsea ; and from- a strong young plant raised from 
a cutting, our drawing was taken last summer. In 
M. Decandolle'8 Prodromus it is described with solitary 
one-flowered peduncles ; this was the case with all the 
old stunted plants at Mr. Anderson's, but the young 
healthy plants all produced their flowers in a corym- 
bus, as represented in our figure ; it is also probable 
that the plants on the rocky mountains of the Canaries 
are also stunted, and produce single flowered pedun- 
cles. 

The present species is not sufficiently hardy to bear 
our winter in the open air, except it be well covered 
up with mats in severe weather, and dry litter laid 
about its roots, as recommended for the former 
species ; it is, however, a hardy greenhouse plant, and 
will succeed in a common frame, covered up with 
mats in severe weather, but openly exposed when the 
weather is fine and mild ; plants preserved in frames 
through the winter, and turned out in the borders of 
shrubberies in spring, will answer best. It succeeds 
well in a light sandy soil, or a mixture of sandy loam 
and peat suits it very well ; it may be propagated by 
cuttings planted under hand-glasses, or by seeds, which 
sometimes ripen. 



31 

CISTUS albidus. 
White-leaved Rock- Rose. 



Sect I. ErYthrocistus. Supra, foL 3. 

• Peduoculis uniffaris, axillaribus vel termunaUbns, mUimrtU urn- 
beliatwe; style cylindrico $€tpi itantinibus longiore; stigmata cojn- 
tato b-sulcato. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. 



C. dOridus, foliis sessQlbus oblougo-ellipticis incano-tomentosis sub- 
trinerriis, floribus 3-8 terminalibus subumbellatia, sepalis extends 
majoribua, petalis valde imbricatis. 

Cistas albidnB. Linn, spec 737. WiUden. *p. pL 2. p. 118a Pen. 
tyn. 2. p. 75. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. fforf • JTeir. ed. 2. v. 3. p. 306. 

Cistas mas. L C/w.AuM.p. 68, ic. Par *. tAeafr. 668. / L 



/Steffi shrubby, erect, much branched, and thickly 
crowded with leaves, clothed with a brown scaly bark: 
branches opposite, erect, thickly clothed with dense 
wool. Leaves opposite, crossing each other, sessile, con- 
nate at the base and surrounding the stem, oblongly 
elliptic or lanceolate, scarcely acute, much undulate, 
3-nerved at the base, reticulately veined, clothed on both 
sides with a dense white stellate pubescence. Flowers 
3 to 8, terminating the branch in a sort of umbellate co- 
rymbus, of a bright lilac or pale rose colour. Bractes 
leaf-like, ovate, obtuse. Pedicles cylindrical, erect, 
stout, densely tomentose. Calyx of 5 acute sepals, the 
2 outer ones largest, cordate, strongly 5-nerved, margins 
a little rolled back, densely clothed with a starry to- 
mentum ; inner ones narrower, taper-pointed, more in- 
clining to membranaceous, also clothed with a stellate 
tomentum. Petals 5, broadly obovate, much imbricate, 
slightly crenulate, more or less crumpled, of a bright 
lilac or rose-coloured, with a yellow spot at the base. 
Stamens numerous, from 180 to 300, in a dense tuft ; 
filaments slender, yellow ; anthers 2-celled, opening at 



the sides to discharge the pollen, which is orange co- 
loured. Gerrnen densely clothed with silky close- 
pressed white hairs. Style pubescent, thickening up- 
wards, about the length of the stamens. ASW§-ma capi- 
tate, slightly 5-lobed, pubescent. 

The present plant is one of the most desirable of its 
tribe, being quite hardy, and will thrive in almost any 
soil or situation where it is not too moist ; its flowers 
are large, and produced in abundance, and it attains 
to a height of 5 or 6 feet when grown in a sheltered 
situation ; fine plants of it are growing in the Garden 
belonging to the Apothecaries' Company, by the side 
of the rock-work, and it is not an uncommon plant in 
Other collections, but is often confused with other spe- 
cies, particularly with C. incanus, which is at present a 
much rarer plant, and which we have been on the look 
out for, for some time past, and have at last met with 
both of Decandolle's varieties at Mr. Lee's of Ham- 
mersmith ; the narrow-leaved one figured by Clusius, 
is, we h^tve little doubt, specifically different from the 
other. C. incanus of the Flora Greca is certainly dif- 
ferent from both, and is probably C. cymosus of De- 
candolle, which is mentioned in his Prodromus as 
being cultivated in Cels's garden under the name of 
C. incanus. 

Many cultivators are deceived by the name of the 
present species, thinking it cannot be C. albidus as its 
flowers are red, but expect that to be one of the white 
flowered species. It succeeds best in a light sandy 
soil, and young cuttings planted under hand-glasses in 
Autumn will soon strike root; it may also be raised 
from seeds, which sometimes ripen plentifully. Drawn 
at the Nursery of Mr. Cobrill, last Summer. 



•* 




A. * fy SA-Jjm*, >-/, ^£Vf 



-^ 



75 



GISTUS rotundifolius. 
Round-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Seel, I. EftYTHROCiSTUfi. Supra fit. 3. 

• Pedunculis uxijloru, axiUaribusvei terminaiibu$ 9 iotitariuum- 
beUatitve; stylo cylindrico, utpt itaminibui Umgiore; stigmate capi- 
tato frsnlcato. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264 



C. rotundtfolhu, foliii rotondato-oratis obtasis plants rogosis reti- 
ealato Tenons utrinque fasekmlato-pilosis, petioKs sulcatis subva- 
gioaotibiis, pedunddishinntissimis snbcjmosb uufloHt l-3-nisre, 
sepalis eordalis acutis pilosis, petalis imbricati*. 

C. viUosus /3. virucens. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264 ? 

Cistas latifolias magno flore. Barrel, ic. 1315. 



A pretty dwarf, very bushy, upright, evergreen shrub, 
scarcely exceeding a foot in height, but densely crowded 
with branches, clothed with rigid persistent hairs: 
branches upright, short, thickly clothed with fascicles of 
short rigid unequal hairs. Jueaves opposite, often as 
broad as long, roundly ovate, very obtuse, flat, rugged, 
reticulately veined, of a darkish green, clothed with 
bunches of short hairs on both sides, rough at the mar- 
gins : upper ones narrower, not so blunt, and more ta- 
pering to the base. Petioles winged oh each side, sheath- 
ing the stem at the base, channelled on the upper side, 
densely clothed with short hairs. Flowers purple, in a 
terminal few-flowered cyme. Bractes leaf-like, linear, 
obtuse, sessile, one at the base of each peduncle. Pe- 
duncles 1 to 3-flowered, thickly clothed with fascicles of 
short rigid hairs. Calyx of 5 sepals, broadly cordate, 
acute, reticulately veined ; the outer ones largest, dense- 
ly clothed with shortish rigid hairs. Petals 5, much 
imbricate, broadly obovate, a little crumpled, purple, 
with a yellow spot at the base. Stamens numerous : 



filaments unequal in length, slender, yellow : pollen 
orange-coloured. Germen silky. Style smooth, long, 
much curved. Stigma capitate, slightly 5-furrowed, 
granular. Capsule about the size of a small hazel-nut, 
five-celled, and many seeded. 

Our drawing of this very handsome plant was made 
at the Nursery of Mr. Pamplin, at Lavender-hill, in the 
Wandsworth-road, the only collection in which we have 
observed it ; we think there can be no doubt but it is the 
same as the one figured in Barretter's Icones above re- 
ferred to, but it can scarcely be C. sericeus to which that 
figure has been generally added as a synonym ; it may 
also, probably ,beDecandolle's variety j3-of C.vUlosuSybut 
we have do hesitation in giving it as a distinct species, 
as it is quite different in habit, as well as in the form pf 
the leaves, and its very large capsule : it makes a snug 
dwarf bushy shrub, and flowers nearly all the Summer ; 
and appears to be quite hardy, having stood the two last 
Winters without protection, thriving well in the common 
soil of the Nursery. It is readily increased by cuttings, 
planted under hand-glasses, in Autumn, or by layers, 
and may also be raised from seeds. 

A few days since, we received a fine flowering speci- 
men of this plant, from Mr. J. Miller's Nursery at 
Bristol, so that it is also in that extensive collection. 



35 

CISTUS villosus. 
Villous Rock-Rose. 



Sect. L Erythrocistus. Supra, foL 3. 

* Pedunculis vni/foru, axillaribus vel terminaUbui, solitariis um- 
bellatisve; stylo cylindrico uept $taminibu$ longiore ; stigmate oapir 
UUo b-sulcato. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. 



C. wllosus, foliis subrotuiido-ovatis planis undulatisve rugosis to- 
mentoso-hirtis petiolatis, petiolis basi dilatatis sulcatis subvagi- 
nantibus, pedunculis subcymosis unifloris 1-3-nisve, sepalis vittosis, 
petalis patentissimis basi imbricatis. 

Cistus villosus. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. Lam. diet. 2. p. \2. WiUden. 
sp.pll.p. 1181. Pert. <y». 2. p. 74. Hort. Kew. erf.2. *.3.p.303. 

Cistus mas major, folio rotundiore. Du Hatnel arb. 1. p. 167. t. 64. 



Stem shrubby, much branched, clothed with a brown 
cracked scaly bark : branches opposite, spreading, erect 
or ascending, densely clothed with short canescent 
wool, and a few longer hairs intermixed. Leaves oppo- 
site, roundly ovate, bluntish, some flat, others undu- 
late, reticulately veined, rugose, tomentosely hairy, of 
a grey or whitish appearance, thickly clothed on both 
sides with short stellate hairs, attenuated down the pe- 
tiole. Petioles villosely hairy, channelled and dilated 
at the base, sheathing the stem. Flowers in a sort of 
cyme, rose-coloured, or purple, varying in colour on 
different plants. Bractes leaf-like, one at the base of 
each peduncle, sessile, lanceolate, taper-pointed. Pe- 
duncles 1 to 3-flowered, thickly clothed with spreading 
villous hairs* Calyx of 5 sepals, which are cordately 
ovate, taper-pointed, thickly clothed with long villous 
hairs : outer ones leaf-like, with the margins a little re- 
flexed : inner ones membranaceous, concave. Petals 5, 
much spreading, imbricate at the base, obovate, or ob- 
cordate, much crumpled, somewhat crenulate, varying 



from a light pink, or rose colour, to a dark purple, with 
a yellow spot at the base. Stamens numerous, from 150 
to 200, overtopping the stigma : filaments slender, 
smooth, pale yellow : anthers 2-celled, attached to the 
filament by their back : pollen bright orange-colour. 
Germen thickly clothed with long closely-pressed silky 
hairs. Style smooth, slightly curved. Stigma capitate, 
slightly 5-furrowed, granular. 

The present is one of the commonest species in all 
the Nurseries about London, where it is sold under se- 
veral different names, and generally for C. salvifohus, 
which is a white flowered species, but resembles the 
present plant a little in habit: there is a good charac- 
teristic figure of the present plant in Duhamel's work 
above quoted, and we have seen fine specimens of it in 
Mr. Lambert's Herbarium, that were received from 
Crete under the name of C. creticus ; but it is very dif- 
ferent from C. creticus of Jacquin, and the Flora Graca, 
a plant that we have not yet met with in any collection ; 
and which, if any of our Subscribers possess, we should 
feel much obliged for an opportunity of giving a figure 
of it: it probably still exists in the Botanic Garden 
at Oxford. 

The present forms a snug compact bush, and con- 
tinues to produce its flowers in succession for a length 
of time ; the flowers vary in colour, from a pale lilac to 
a dark purple, and very much even on the same plant 
at different times. M. Decandolle's variety virescens we 
have not yet met with. If planted on rock- work, or in the 
open borders, it will require to be covered with a mat, 
or some other covering, in severe frosty weather, as it is 
a native of the South of Europe; but it will succeed 
very well through a mild Winter without the least pro- 
tection: it thrives best in rather a dry situation, as too 
much moisture is apt to rot its roots; it also succeeds 
well in pots in a light sandy soil, when it can be pre- 
served in frames in Winter. Cuttings of it strike root 
freely, if planted under hand-glasses in August or Sep- 
tember; it may also be raised from seeds, which ripen 
plentifully. 



<f 




/nan urt 



Ai 6^7M*d i w» f J**US14 



W»JU*Uf* 



<f 



63 

CISTUS undulatus. 

Wave-leaved Rock- Rose. 



Sect. I. Ervthrocistus. Supra foi. 3. 

• Pedunculis uuifloris, axillaribus aut terminalibus, soliiariis um- 
bellatine; stylo cylindrico tape staminibus longiore ; stitfmate capitate 
b-sulcato* 



C. undulatus, foliis subseisilibus aut in petiolum brevem attenuates 
margine undulatis rugosis acabris utrinque pilosis subcanescentibus ; 
inferioribus elliptico-oblongis acutis basi attenuatis trinerviis : su- 
perioribus linearibus basi connatis, pedunculis solitariis 1-3-floris, 
sepalis longe acuminatis villosis, capsula rotundo-ovata adpresse 
aericeo-pilosa. 

Cist us undulatus. Dunal in DC.prodr. v.l. p. 264. n. 8, Swt. hart, 
brit. edit. 2. p. 41. n. 8. 



Stem shrubby, much branched, forming a handsome 
close compact bush : branches thickly clothed with short 
woolly hairs, the younger ones with spreading villous 
ones. Leaves variable, sessile, or attenuated into a sort 
of short footstalk at the base, oblong or elliptically 
oblong, acute, the lower ones ovate and bluntish, more 
or less undulate at the margins, rough and rugged, 
three-nerved and attenuated at the base, reticulately 
veined, hairy oh both sides and slightly canescent, the 
hairs short and in fascicles : upper leaves linear, spread- 
ing, the points generally reflexed, connected at the base. 
Flowers varying from light to bright purple, terminal, 
solitary or in threes, terminating the young branches, 
which sometimes give an appearance of being panicu- 
late or cymose, the young branches being oftentimes 
crowded at the points of the main shoot. Peduncles 
short, densely clothed with tufts of hairs, which give 
them a woolly appearance. Calyx of 5 sepals, that are 
ovate, concave, villous at the base, and tapering to a long 



slender point, strongly nerved with purple nerves: 
inner ones broadest and more concave, membranaceous 
at the edges. Petals 5, broadly obovate, imbricate, crum- 
pled, slightly crenulate, of a reddish purple, pale yellow 
at the base. Stamens numerous : Jilaments bright yellow, 
smooth, unequal in length : pollen golden yellow. Ger- 
men roundish, densely clothed with close-pressed white 
hairs. Style smooth, slender at the base and thickening 
upwards, about the length of the stamens. Stigma 5- 
furrowed, capitate. Capsule roundly oval, densely clothed 
with close-pressed silky hairs. 

We are now convinced that the present plant is C. 
undulatus y having received a plant of it from the Cheva- 
lier Soulange Bodin,under that name ; it also agrees very 
well with the description in Decandolle's Prodromus ; 
and is readily distinguished from C. creticus, with which 
we had confused it, by its long style, which in that spe- 
cies is very short, and quite hid by its large stigma. 

Our drawing was made from a plant,- at the Nursery 
of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith ; we also received a plant 
of it from Mr. Miller, of the Bristol Nursery, which we 
planted in our garden in a northen aspect, with many 
other rather tender sorts ; they stood there the whole of 
last Winter without the least protection, and not one of 
them were hurt ; whereas several others that were planted 
in a southern aspect, were all killed, or so severely hurt, 
that they were not worth keeping. 

The leaves of the present species are much more un- 
dulate in Autumn andWinter, than in the Summer when 
in bloom ; at that time they are very slightly undulate. 
It is a native of the Levant ; as numerous plants of it 
were raised at Messrs. Young's Nursery, at Epsom, from 
seeds received from thence ; it is most probably also a 
native of the South of Europe. Any light sandy soil will 
suit it very well ; and young cuttings, planted under 
•hand-glasses, in August or September, will strike root 
readily. 



7 



44 




Jl.lty /J^w* Jfi^iA-lglJ. 



7 



44 

CISTUS incanug. 
Hoary Rock-Rose. 



Sect I. ERYTHBOCI8TU8. SwpnfsL 3. 

• Pedanoulis unifloris, axillaribus vel terwrinalibug, ioHtarik mm- 
bellatisve; stylo cynndrico «ep£ staminibut Umgicre; stigmate capi- 
tat0 5-sulcato. DC. prodr. I . p. 364. 



C. iutmnw, folii* of*to*pattalatii tomentoao-idcanif ragoiia bail 
aUennalis snbtrinenriis sessilibtu subconnaiiaj ftuperioribus an- 
goatioribns, pedunculia subunifloris villosis, sepalis ovatis villosia, 
petalis imbricatis. 

Cistua ioeanu*; Lin*, spec. \. p. *797i WiNdt** spte. pL 8. p. 118& 
Pen. sun. 2. p. 75. DC.prsir. 1; v.. 904%. jjmajf. jyrt. 2. p. 686. 
Jfer*. Jfeia. erf. 3. v. a. p. 806. Oft** BoUn. magam. 48. Svt. 
Aor*. brit. p. 34. «. 7. 



Stem shrubby, very much branched : branches short 
and crowded, thickly clothed with short grey down, 
and longer hairs intermixed. Leaves sessile, ovately 
spathulate, obtuse, attenuated towards the base, slightly 
3-nerved, rugose, undulate, reticulately veined, clothed 
with a short dense white tomentum, which wears off by 
age, slightly connected at the base, and sheathing the 
stem a little : upper ones narrower and acute, more hairy. 
Peduncles short and stout, villosely tomentose, one- 
flowered, generally solitary, but sometimes in pairs. Co- 
fyx of 5 sepals, which are ovate and acute, thickly clo- 
thed with short villous down; two inner ones concave, 
with subulate points, membranaceous on one side. Pe- 
tals 5, obovate, imbricate, undulate, and crumpled, of a 
light rosy lilac, with a faint yellow spot near the base. 
Stamens very numerous, surrounding the stigma: fila- 
ments long and slender, smooth, of a light yellow : pol- 
len bright orange colour. Germen clothed with long vil- 
lous down. /Styfcaboutthe length of the stamens, smooth, 
slender at the base. Stigma capitate, 5-forrowed, papil- 
lose. 



Our drawing of this plant was taken at the Nursery 
of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, the only collection in 
which we have met with it; and we were at one time 
afraid that it had disappeared altogether from our collec- 
tions, as when we have enquired for it, we have always 
been shown C. albidus, or C. villosvs, the species that are 
generally sold for it at the Nurseries ; we also possess 
a drawing of the plant that is figured by Clusius, which 
has been considered a narrow-leaved variety of the pre- 
sent ; but on comparing the two plants when flowering 
together, in a living state, we find sufficient characters 
to distinguish them as distinct species, we have there- 
fore named that C. canescens, which will be published 
in our next number. C. incanus, of the Flora Graca, is 
certainly not our plant, but from the figure we believe 
it to be C. cymosus of Decandolle. 

The present plant will endure our mildest Winters 
in the open air, but it will require covering in severe 
frosty weather ; it is also best to preserve some plants 
of it in pots, that they may be protected in frames or in 
the Greenhouse in Winter ; a light sandy soil suits it 
best, and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in 
August or September, will soon strike root, so that they 
are not planted too close together, or they will be very 
likely to damp. 



9 



45 

CISTUS canescens. 

Narrow-leaved hoary Rock- Rose. 



Sect I. Erythrocistus. Supra foLS. 

* Pedunenlis nutfiaris, axiUarihu id terminalibus 9 soUiariis «m- 
beUatum ; stylo cytindrico $cepi itaminibut longiore; stigmata copt- 
tato 5-sulcato. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. 



C. canesceni, foliis oblongo-linearibas obtasiuscnlis tomentoso-ca- 
nescentibus andulatis sabtrineiriis sessilibus subconnatis, pedan- 
cnlis terminalibus unifloris tut subcymosis, sepalis ovatis aoutis 
nervosis steUato-pubescentibus, peialis obovatis distinotis. 

Cistas canescens. bwt. hart. brit. p. 46& ». 29. 

Cistus mas 2. Cltu. hut. 1. p. 69. ic. 

Cistas incanns 0. foliis linearibus longis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. 



jStem shrubby, much branched : branches spreading, 
densely clothed with fascicles of very short rigid hairs, 
which are stellately spreading ; the leaves, peduncles, 
and calyx, are all densely covered with the same sort 
of hairs, which are so short and close to each other as 
to appear like soft down. Leaves sessile, clasping the 
stem and connected at the base, oblongly linear, blunt- 
ish, the upper ones more pointed, attenuated a little 
towards the base, but not near so much as in C. incanus, 
some a little undulate, others quite flat, of a white 
hoary colour, underneath more or less 3-nerved and 
reticulately veined, a little rugose : upper leaves broad- 
est at the base, with acute points. Flowers terminal, 
in a sort of cyme on the strong shoots, on the weaker 
ones solitary. Peduncles cylindrical, with a leafy bracte 
at the base of each. Calyx of 5 sepals, which are ovate, 
acute, undulate, strongly nerved with 4 to 6 prominent 
nerves, inner ones rather smallest and convex, or con- 
cave inside, with needle-shape points. Petals 5, obo- 
vate, distinctly spreading, much crumpled, the margins 

N 



crenulate, of a darkish purple, tinged with blue, and a 
yellow spot at the base of each. Stamens numerous, 
about the length of the style ; filaments smooth, yellow, 
unequal in length : pollen orange-coloured. Germen 
densely clothed with close-pressed white hairs. Style 
smooth, a little bent, very slender at the base, but thick- 
ening upwards. Stigma capitate, slightly 5-furrowed, 
fimbriate. 

Our drawing of this rare and handsome plant was 
taken at the Nursery of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, 
last Summer. It has generally been considered as a 
variety of C. incanu^ but we have no hesitation in giv- 
ing it as a distinct species, easily distinguishable at 
first sight from all others, whether in flower or not ; 
as it is a native of the South of Europe, it is rather 
more tender than some of the other species, and re- 

auires a little covering in severe frosty weather, either 
ae covering of a mat, or to be protected by a frame, 
succeeding well in a light sandy soil. Young cuttings, 
planted under hand-glasses in August or September, 
will soon strike root, but they must not remain covered 
too long, or they will be liable to damp off. 



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22 

CISTUS crispus. 
C*rk4-l«wd Mock-Row. 



Seat. L BarrHEocijartJ*. fav«, /<£&. 

• Pcdunculit vmtfm*. <u$U*pfms vtl UmiyUibu$ f . ^ 

beUatisve; stylo attimjrua $api stm*inibu$ Umgiort; stigmgte capi- 
tatd 5-sulcato. DC. prodr. 1. p. 3*4. 



$otot*riii 



€i«riqmt, foKifi tessilibus Hnearl-lanceolatis nndolato-crispis tri- 

MBfiis ragotia pvbettotttibus, floritas jubsessilitas 8-4-nis m* 

toUttijk PC profit, i. p. 364. 
Cista* crispus. Z,t*». jrpec. l. p. 738. Willdc*.m> pi 2. p. 1188. 

Ten. sy».2.p.75. CatHm. tc.2. p. 57. 1. 174. J»or^ UTew. at. 2. 

v. 8. p. 806. Spreng. si/st. veg. 2. p. 686. 



jSfcm woody, erect or slightly flexuose, clothed wkh 
a brown more or less cracked bark, much branched : 
branches opposite, spreading, thickly clothed with un- 
equal spreading villous white hairs. Leaves opposite, 
sessile, linearly lanceolate, acute, rugose, three-nerved 
at the base, retieulately veined underneath, clothed on 
both sides with a close short white pubescence, roughish 
to the touch, margins much undulate or curled . Flowers 
of a red purple, terminal, subcymbse, nearly sessile, or 
with very short peduncles, 3 to 7-flowered. Bractes 
small, leaf-like, lanceolate, acute. Peduncles 1 to 3- 
flowered. Pedicles very short, villosely hairy. Calyx of 
5 sepals, the 2 outer ones largest, leaf-like, ovate, acute, 
many nerved ; the third narrower and scariose on one 
side, inner ones smaller, concave, scariose, taper-pointed. 
Petals 5, broadly obovate, imbricate nearly their whole 
length, edges crenulate. Stamens from 150 to 180, com- 
. pact, surrounding the style : filaments smooth, pale 
yellow; pollen orange-coloured. Style pubescent, scarce- 
ly as long as the stamens. Stigma capitate, tuberculate. 

This is a very pretty and distinct species, a native of 
the South of Europe, and if grown in a sheltered situa- 

g2 



tion will stand the severity of our Winters without pro- 
tection ; it varies considerably m the size of its leaves, 
and also in their being more or less curled, but it is 
readily recognized by the short stalks of the flowers ; 
the petals are also of a different sort of red from any other 
species, so that it makes a very pleasing variety ; it also 
makes a snug growing bushy plant, and its flowers are 
produced in succession from June to August, and are 
sometimes succeeded by ripe seeds. It succeeds well in 
the common garden soil ; or if grown in pots or on rock- 
work, a mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit it very 
well. Cuttings of it, planted under hand-glasses in Au- 
tumn, will strike root readily, but they will not strike 
so freely in Summer ; the young shoots must be taken 
for cuttings, and must not be planted too close together, 
or they will be apt to damp one another off; plants may 
also be raised from seeds, which may either be sown as 
soon as gathered, or left till Spring ; they will succeed 
equally well, if transplanted thinly into pots when of a 
small size, that they may not miss their removal. 

Our drawing was made from plants at the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham, 
last Summer. 



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6 



CISTUS heterophyllus. 
Various-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Sect I. Erythrocistus, Supra, foL 3. 

* Pedancalis wiifloru, axillaribus vel terminalibui, soHtariii, 
mmbellatisve : stylo eylindrico $ap$ staminibns longiare; stigmato 
capitate 5 lulcato. DC. prodr. !. p. 264. 



C. keteropkuUuM, folia ovato-lanceolatis brevitor petiolatis basi 
▼aginantibus margine revolutis utrinquo viridibus, pedancalis 
hirsatis foliosis a&ifloris 1-2-ternisve, petalis rotandato-obovatis 
basi imbricatis. 

Cistas beteropfayllas. Detf. atl. 1. p. 411. t. 104. Pen. tyu. 2. 
p. 75. DC. prodr. 1. p. 264. Hort. $ub. land. p. 123. Spreng. 
sy$t. veg. 2. p. 584* 



A stiff upright woody shrub, much branched : branches 
short and rigid, spreading, of a reddish brown colour, 
thickly clothed with a woolly pubescence. Leaves 
small, with short petioles, sheathing at the base, very 
variable, green on both sides, reticulately veined un- 
derneath, slightly hairy and ciliate, the nerves pubes- 
cent : lower ones round or ovately rounded, obtuse, the 
margins slightly revolute ; upper ones lanceolate, more 
acute, and the margins much revolute. Petioles very 
short, winged, and fringed with long white hairs. 
Flowers large, terminating the branches, from 1 to 5, 
of a bluish rose-colour. Peduncles of a brownish red 
colour, very hairy and rough, one-flowered, with two 
leafy bractes about the middle of each. Bractes sessile, 
lanceolate, bluntish, hairy and strongly fringed. Calyx 
of 5 sepals, outer ones flat, cordately ovate, acute, rigid, 
strongly and numerously nerved underneath, hairy on 
both sides, and fringed with long white hairs ; 2 inner 
ones concave, membranaceous, pubescent, much veined, 
and terminated with a sharp mucro. Petals 5, or 
sometimes increased to 6, obovate with rounded points, 
much crumpled, margins a little uneven, or slightly 

c 2 



crenulate, imbricate only at the base, and distinct 
from about the middle, of a bluish rose colour, incli- 
ning to purple, and a bright yellow spot at the base. 
Stamens numerous, surrounding the style, from 100 to 
150: filaments smooth, pale yellow: pollen bright 
orange-coloured. Germen sericeous. Style smooth, 
about the length of the stamens. Stigma capitate, 
5-lobed, pustulose. 

Our drawing of this rare and very distinct species 
was taken from a fine plant at the Nursery of Messrs. 
Whitley, Brames, and Milne, in July last, in whose 
collection we have also met with some other very rare 
species ; we think the present the most curious of any 
that we have yet seen ; the plant has a tree-like ap- 
pearance, with short stiff branches; and although its 
leaves are so small, the flowers are nearly as large as 
any of the genus, and are of a lively colour ; those are 
produced from the beginning of June until the end of 
July : it is a native of uncultivated hills in Algiers, 
and therefore requires the protection of a frame or 
greenhouse in Winter ; or if planted against a wall, 
and well covered with mats in severe frost, it will suc- 
ceed very well ; if grown in pots, it will thrive well in 
any rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and 
peat will suit it very well ; it does not strike freely 
from cuttings, the shoots being so short and hard that 
good ones are with difficulty procured ; those should 
be taken off before too ripe, and planted under a hand- 
glass. Seeds are sometimes ripened, which is the best 
method of increasing it. 



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112 

CISTUS creticus, 

Cretan Rock-Rose. 



Sect I. Erythrocistus. Supra fol.S. 

** Pedunculis cymosis aut 1-2-Jloru; stylo subnullo capitato sta- 
minibus breviore. 



C creticus, foliis spathulato-ovatis rugosis scabris tomentoso-hirtis 
in petiolum brevem attenuates margine undulatis, pedunculis sub- 
binatis unifloris, sepalis acuminatis villosis, capsula pilosa. 

Cistus creticus. Linn, spec, l.p.738. Jacq. ic. rar.l. t. 95. Flor.grcec. 
t. 495. Willd. spec, pi 2. p. 1186. Pers. syn. 2. p. 75. Hort. Kew. 
edit. 2. v. 3. p. 306. DC.prodr. 1. p. 264. Spreng. syst. 2. p. 584. 



A handsome upright dwarf bushy Shrub : branches 
spreading, thickly clothed with unequal entangled hairs, 
the younger ones with spreading villous ones. Leaves 
spathulately ovate, bluntly rounded, attenuated into a 
sort of petiole towards the base, the lower ones much 
broader than the upper ones, reticulately veined, rugose, 
undulate at the margins, of a pale whitish green, or 
somewhat canescent, tomentosely hairy, the hairs short 
and in irregularly stellate fascicles. Flowers terminal, 
solitary, or in pairs, of a purplish red. Peduncles soli- 
tary, or sometimes binate, densely clothed with woolly 
hairs, generally one or two flowered . Calyx of 5 sepals, 
villosely hairy : sepals ovate, concave inwards, tapering 
to a long slender point, strongly nerved with purple 
veins : inner ones broadest, more concave, and mem- 
branaceous at the edges. Petals 5, imbricate at the base, 
the points distinct, obovate, much undulate and cram- 
pled, nerved from the base, of a pale reddish purple, 
with a pale yellow mark on each at the base. Stamens 
numerous : filaments pale yellow, smooth, unequal in 



length : pollen golden yellow. Germen densely clothed 
with woolly hairs. Style scarcely any. Stigma capitate, 
flattened, quite hiding the style, tuberculate. 

The plant that we originally gave under this name is 
not correct, but proves to be the C. undulatus of Dunal 
in Decandolle's Prodromus; we therefore take the pre- 
sent opportunity of setting it right, by giving a figure 
of the real species, with a fresh leaf of letter-press, for 
the one that we had given for it at folio 63 : the present 
plant is readily distinguished from that, and all others 
that are related to it, by its very short style, which is 

Suite hid by its large stigma, and brings it in the second 
ivision of the section Erythrocistus, with C. pur- 
pur eus, C. cymosus, and C. parviflorus, from all of which 
it is distinguished at first sight 

Being a native of Greece, the present species is rather 
tender, and is very apt to be killed, when exposed to the 
open air of our climate in Winter ; this will partly ac- 
count for its present scarcity ; and being so much like 
C. villosus and C. undulatus in common appearance, it is 
often confused with these species in collections ; and the 
C. purpureus is generally sold for it at the Nurseries, 
which is also a native of Crete ; but the fine dark spots 
at the base of its petals, has rendered it an object of 
more care than most of the other species, that are not 
so showy. 

We believe the present species is scarcely to be met 
with at any Nursery, except that of Messrs. Whitley, 
Brames, and Milne, at Fulham, where there are a few 
plants of it. 



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17 

CISTUS purpureus. 
Purple-flowered Rock-Rose. 



Sect I. AfTf hbocistus. Supra, foL 3. 

*+ PedndiHi cymons; stylo tubnullo capitato $tami*ibu$ breviore. 



d. pwrpmreus, foliis oblongo-lanceolatts acutis obtusure rugosi* 
reticulaio-Yenosi* margine usdulatis, petiolis brevibu* piloso*- 
oiUatu Yagiuantibns, peduncttlis breribus l-2-teraiare ant tnb- 
ejtaoais» sepali* aouminatis exterioribu* minoribu*, peUlis obo- 
rato-cuneatK valde imbrioatis. 

Cittus purpureus. Lam. diet. 2. p. 14. Peri. *y». 2. p. 75. JTer. 
Bifc rag. t. 408. DC. prwfr. 1. p. 904, £»*. A**. m+. land, 
p. 123. Spring. $g$t. veg. 2. p. 584. 



jft^tt shrubby* erect, much branched: breaches erect 
or ascending* thickly clothed with a rusty pubescence. 
Leaver opposite, oblong and obtuse, nearly flat, others 
oblongly lanceolate, or narrowly lanceolate and acute, 
with undulate margins, all tapering at the base, more 
or les? rugose, reticulately veined, densely pubescent 
on the lower side, and more thinly on the upper. Pe- 
tioles short, connected at the; base and sheathing the 
stem, haasy. Plotters terminal, from 1 to 6 on short 
peduncles, Bractes sessile* leaf-like, broad and concave 
at the base, where they are connected, and terminating 
in an acute point, pubescent. Pedicles short, clothed 
with tufts of short hairs, and longer ones intermixed. 
Calyx of 6 sepals* clothed with fascicles of short hairs, 
fringed and taper-pointed : 2 outer ones smallest and 
narrowest, cordately ovate ; inner ones cordate, con- 
cave, with membranaceous margins. Petals 5 or 6, obo- 
vatSor obovately wedge-shaped, very much imbricate, 
more or less crumpled, of a bright reddish purple, with 
a yellow spot at the base, above which is a large dark 
velvet mark, surrounded with red, and slightly branched. 



Stamens numerous, about 150, filaments smooth, pale 
yellow : pollen orange-coloured. Germen densely clo- 
thed with close-pressed silky hairs. Style very short. 
Stigma large, capitate, 5-lobed, papillose. 

This very fine species is generally known in the col- 
lections about London by the name of C. creticus ; but 
that is a very different plant, and one that we have not 
met with in any collection last Summer ; that is rea- 
dily distinguished from any other, by its dwarf bushy 
growth, and generally bearing only one or two flowers 
on each peduncle, which terminates the branches ; the 
petals are much imbricate, and the colour of a reddish 
purple, without any dark spots at the base ; it is much 
nearer related to C. villosus than to the present plant, 
and we have seen specimens of C. villosus in Mr. Lam-: 
bert's Herbarium that were received from Crete, under 
the name of C. creticus. 

According to M. Decandolle, the present species is 
a native of the Levant, and is rather too tender to en- 
dure our severest Winters without protection; but it 
will succeed well against a wall, so as to be covered up 
with mats in severe frost ; and in the warmer counties, 
such as Devonshire, we believe it would survive with* 
out any protection whatever : plants of it, if kept in 
pots, and preserved in frames all the Winter, and then 
turned in the borders in Spring, will make a fine ap- 
pearance, as it grows very fast, and makes a hand- 
some shrub ; it will succeed well in the common garden 
soil, or if grown in pots, a mixture of sandy loam and 
peat will suit it very well. Young cuttings, planted 
under hand-glasses in August or September, will soon 
strike root ; but the glasses must not remain on them 
long after they are rooted, or they will be liable to damp 
off; they will succeed best if potted off, and preserved 
in frames through the Winter. Drawn at Mr. ColvilTs 
Nursery, last Summer. 



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90 

CISTUS eymosus. 

Cpncfiowered Rock-Rose. 



Sttt. I, £R*TlUU>61STtrS. Stiprafoi. 9. 

" Pedunculis lubcgmoris: stylo tubnulh eapiiatd iftMiMfct to* 



C cyiiuwv*, foliis Iato-ovatis apice contortis acutiusculis subtils ru- 

gosis incanis petiolatis, petiolis basi dilatatis sulcatis subvaginan- 

tibua, pechtacutis cymosis 5-10-Aoris incanis axillat ibus termina- 

libusre. Duml in DC. prodr. 1 . p. 285. 

Cuius cymosus. DC. prodr. 1. p. 265. Swt. hart. brit. p. 34. »» 18, 

Cistus incanus. Smith in Sibthorp'i Flora Gmeca. t. 494. nee aliorum. 



A very handsome small bushy shrub, much branched, 
tShe branches ascending, rather short and slender, clo- 
thed with a rough hairy pubescence. Leaves petiokte, 
broadly ovate, scarcely acute, the points more or less 
twisted, underneath rugose and reticulately veined, clo- 
thed with a short thin hoary canescence, and short hairs 
intermixed. Petioles dilated at the base and clasping 
the stem, somewhat winged, more or less tinged with 
red^ and channelled on the upper side. Flowers of a 
lively red, middle sized or smallish, produced in nume- 
rous many-flowered cymes. Peduncles hairy and ca- 
nescent. Bractes oblong, bluntish. Pedicles hairy and 
canescent. Calyx of 5 sepals, that are ovately lanceo- 
late and taper-pointed, veined with red lines, hoary 
and clothed with shortish hairs. Petals 5, obcordate, 
imbricate, of a bright red, in some plants pale lilac, 
more or less crumpled from their thin texture. Stamens 
numerous : filaments yellow : pollen orange-colour. Ger- 
men tomentose. Style very short, quite hid by the capi- 
late stigma, which is slightly 5-furrowed, and papil- 
lose. 

2 a 2 



The present handsome and numerous flowered spe- 
cies is a native of the Levant, and has been often con- 
fused with C.incanus, under which name it is pub- 
lished in the Flora Graca, and, according to Dunal, is 
cultivated by the same name in M. Cels' Nursery at 
Paris ; it is nearer related to C. villosus, but is readily 
distinguished from both by its sessile stigma, which 
brings it much nearer to Cparviftorus, to which it is 
certainly nearest related. 

As the present plant is a native of the Levant, it is 
rather tender, and liable to be killed by the frost, if 
not covered, or protected in a frame or greenhouse, by 
which means it is scarce, and it is generally confused 
with some of the more common species. Dunal does 
not appear to know of what country it is a native, hav- 
ing only seen cultivated plants of it in M. Cels' garden. 
It may be grown with good success in the same manner 
as recommended for C.jparviflorus, and C. purpureas 9 
two species with which it agrees in its nearly sessile 
stigma ; a light sandy soil suits it best, or, if grown in 
pots, an equal portion of light turfy loam, peat, and 
sand, will suit it very well; and young cuttings, 
planted under hand-glasses in August or September, 
will strike root readily, but a little air must be given 
them occasionally to dry up the moisture, or they will 
be liable to damp off; as soon as they are properly 
rooted, they must be potted off, and placed in a close 
frame for a few days, till they have made fresh root, 
when they must be hardened to the air by degrees. 



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14 



CISTUS parviflorus. 
Small-flowered Rock-Rose. 



Sect. I. Eryturocistus. Supra, folB. 
•* Podonoiilis subcymosis; atylo eubnullo eapitato $tami»ibu* bre- 
num. 



C. parvijbrus, foliia oratis aeutis subtomentosis baai trinerriis reti- 
culato-venosis petiolatis : petiolis basi connatis subvaginantibua, 
pednncuUa subcjmosis terminalibus, calycibus acutis villous, 
petalis distinotis obcordatis caljce doplo longioribus. 

Cistas parviflorai . Lam. diet. 2. p. 14. Pen. *yn. 2. p. 76. DC. 
prod. 1. p. 264. Swt. tort. brit. p. 34. n. 8. Spreng. tytt. 2. p. 584. 



Stan shrubby, much branched : branches spreading, 
rather slender, densely clothed with a white tomentum. 
Leaves ovate, acute, somewhat twisted, thinly clothed 
with a white tomentum, 3-nerved at the base, rugose, 
reticulately veined, petiolate. Petioles connected at 
the base, and sheathing the stem, tomentosely hairy. 
Flowers more or less cymose, terminal, of a pale rose 
colour. Bractes ovate, acute, concave. Peduncles 
1 to 3-flowered, villpsely hairy. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
villous, acute, outer ones narrowest, ovately oblong, 
inner ones ovate, concave, with membranaceous mar- 
gins. Petals 5, more than double the length of the 
calyx, obcordate, distinct, not imbricate, slender at 
the base, pale rose-coloured. Stamens about 30, short, 
but overtopping the stigma; filaments smooth, pale 
yellow : pollen bright yellow. Germen tomentose. Style 
very short. Stigma large, capitate, deeply 5-chan- 
nelled, papillose. 

For the opportunity of giving a figure of this very 
rare and handsome plant, we are obliged to Mr. Wil- 
liam Anderson, Curator of the Apothecaries' Garden 
at Chelsea, who kindly informed us when it was in 
bloom ; we are certain that it is the species for which 

e 2 



we have given it, having seen many fine specimens of 
it in Mr. Lambert's Herbarium, which were collected 
in Crete, of which country it is a native; most authors 
have described it as bearing only three flowers on the 
peduncle, but amongst Mr. Lambert's specimens were 
several producing the flowers in a sort of cyme, as in 
our figure. In the same collection, and from the same 
country, were two other species, one marked C. sedvi- 
folius, the other C. monspeliensis, both of which were 
different from the origina^species ; and we have since 
found living plants of both at the Nursery of Messrs. 
Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham, and have 
procured fine figures of them ; they were most proba- 
bly introduced by Dr. Sibthorp, when he returned from 
Greece, and have been in our collections ever since, 
without being ever noticed. 

As the present species is a native of Crete, it will 
require protection in severe weather, either to be kept 
in a greenhouse or frames, or to be planted against a 
south wall or in rock- work, and to be covered with 
mats or some other covering in severe frost, but to be 
exposed as much as possible in mild weather : a light 
sandy soil will suit it best; or if grown in pots, an 
equal mixture of light turfy loam and peat will suit it 
very well. Young cuttings taken off at a joint, and 
planted under hand-glasses, in September or October, 
will sopn strike root ; it may also be raised from seeds, 
which will ripen occasionally. 

The present species, and also C. purpureas, belong 
to the second division of M. Decandolle's section 
Erythrocistus, containing those with, a very short 
or scarcely any style. 



/& 




;s 



15 

CISTUS latifolius. 
Broad-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Sect. II. Ledonia. Supra, fol. 1. 

§ 1 . Pedoncnlis unifloru, ant mmltifloru egmosu, aepalis 5, extent* 
mepius corda&s ocuminaHe ; capsulia 6-loculari&us. 

** Pedunculu bracteatis, basi bractcolti caducis parvulis concavis 
coriaeeis subluttis decussatis, infra medium 2 opposite majoribus. 



C. latifolius, foliis petiolatia lato cordatia acutia margine eriapato- 
nndulatia denticulatia ciliatia, peduncolis bracteatis longja subcj- 
moaia villoao-piloais, aepalis lato-cordatia villosis, peUlia imfrri- 
catia. 

Ciatna latifolius. Swt. hort. brit. p. 84. k« 23. Supra, foL 8. in ob$. 

Ciatoa populifoliua, a. major. DC. prodr. 1. p. 266. 



A large branching shrub, with brown glossy bark : 
branches spreading, crooked, when young, clothed with 
long white hairs, which drop off as the shoots advance 
in age, they are then smooth and glossy. Leaves op- 
posite, nearly as broad as long, cordate and overlap- 
ping at the base, acute, the points reflexed, under- 
neath strongly nerved, the nerves much branched, re- 
ticulately veined, more or less hairy on both sides, 
margins curled or much undulate, and toothed with 
numerous small teeth, also ciliate, of a pale green co- 
lour. Petioles stout, channelled on the upper side 
and rounded on the lower, widened and sheathing the, 
stem at the base, margins purple, fringed. Peduncles 
long, axillary, bracteate at the base, subcymose, in 
our specimens from 3 to 5-flowered, lower part glossy, 
upper part villosely hairy. Bractes decussate, or cross- 
ing each other, falling before the flowers expand ; 
lower ones small, oblong, concave, keeled, hairy in- 
side, fringed, bluntish, but terminated with a small 
, point : upper ones larger and more acute, also keeled, 
villous inside and fringed with white hairs. Pedicles 



cylindrical, villoeely hairy, nodding before the flowers 
expand, then becoming erect. Calyx of 5 sepals, densely 
clothed with spreading villous white hairs ; outer se- 
pals broadly cordate, rounded, with a short point, of a 
brownish colour, margins slightly reflexed ; inner ones 
membranaceous, terminated by a sharp, rigid, brown 
point. Petals 5, or sometimes increased to 6, much 
imbricate, obcordate, more or less wrinkled, white, with 
a yellow spot at the base. Stamens numerous, from 
120 to 150, overtopping the stigma: filaments smooth, 
straw-coloured : pollen orange-coloured. Germen se- 
riceous. Stigma large, sessile, capitate, lobed, and 
papillose. 

Of the present very rare species we have only seen 
one living plant, which was at the Nursery of Mr. 
John Lee of Hammersmith, from which our drawing 
and description were made last June: we believe that 
no person who ever saw the present species and the 
C. populifolius of Cavanilles growing together, would 
ever consider them as varieties of the same species ; we 
consider them as distinct as any two species in one 
section had need be. We observed some fine specimens 
of it in Mr. Lambert's Herbarium, where it was also 
confused with C. populifolius. Being a native of Bar- 
bary, we suspect it will also require some protection in 
Winter, either to be planted against a south wall in 
rich soil, and to be covered with mats in severe wea- 
ther, or to be protected in a frame or in the greenhouse 
in Winter ; when it becomes more plentiful, plants of 
it may be kept in pots in the frames in Winter, and 
'turned out in the borders in Spring, where they will 
produce their flowers in greater perfection than if 
grown in pots : being a large robust growing shrub, it 
will require stronger soil than the weaker growing 
sorts ; a mixture of two-thirds loam and one-third peat 
will be a proper soil for it when grown in pots. Young 
cuttings taken off at a joint, the latter end of Summer, 
will soon strike root, if planted under hand-glasses. 



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83 

CISTUS populifolius. 

Poplar-leaved Mock-Rose. 



8eet II. Lbdohia. Supra, /of. 1. 

$ 1. Peduncalif uni/oris, *ut muitijhru cgwums, sepalis 6, exter- 
mii uepius eerdatis acumuiatu; capsnlis b-bcufarilm*. 

•• P«Imm*J<s br*cte*tU, ban brmeUoBs cmduek pmrtmiuamta 
ttsimmm mMtfrif ttauMtu* nifrm medium 8 oppotUummjtribw. 



C. p*pmkf6Uu$, foljia petkflatia cordatis acuminata rogoais karitaa 
Margin* lUMtalatia, floribna oymoaia, peduuculii bracteatis pitaao* 
pubetcentibua, bracteia obloogis aouti* carinatis, sepalia actuni- 
natia nitidis viacosit, petalis patentibna. 

Ciatna popaMffaDiia. Li**, spec. 786. Coo. i& 8. p. 8. 1.816. WilkL 
ap.p&8.p.ll8S. Pers.syn*%.p.74. Hurt. Kew. ed. 8. v, 3, p. 808. 
^pr«*^. «yrf. 8. p. 686. 

Cistiia populifolhu. minor. DC. prtdr. 1 . p. 868. 



A large strong-growing shrub, with stiff spreading 
branches : branches clothed with a brown glossy bark, 
slightly viscous, and scarcely pubescent. Leave* petio- 
late, cordate, tapering to a point, reticulately veined, 
rugged and uneven, without pubescence, of a dark green 
colour, margins undulate, minutely denticulate. Petioles 
rather long, widened and fringed at the base, clasping 
the stem, channelled on the upper side, and rounded on 
the lower, slightly pubescent, and spotted with numerous 
very small black warts or scales. Flowers large, white, 
cymose, nodding before expansion, afterwards becoming 
erect. Perfimcfobracteate, pubescent. Braetes crossing 
each other, oblong, acute, keeled, concave, fringed, of 
a reddish purple ; lower ones smallest. Pedicles short, 
thinly pubescent, rather viscous. Cafyx of 5 sepals, the 
2 outer ones largest, cordate, acute, smooth and glossy, 
viscous, slightly pubescent, sides a little reflexed, inner 
ones smaller, more taper-pointed and membranaceous. 
Petals 5, white, with a light yellow spot at the base, 



obcordate, crumpled, imbricate at the base, at first cup- 
shaped, afterwards reflexed. Stamens numerous, from 
100 to 130. Oermm (tensely villous. Style scarcely any. 
Stigma capitate, slightly 5-lobed, granular. 

A strong robust species, native of the South of Eu- 
rope, and is rather tender, as it will sometimes be in- 
jured in severe Winters if not protected, but it stands 
our milder ones very well in the open air. The difference 
between our present plant and C. latifolius, fol. 15, may 
be readily perceived by a comparison of our figures ; and 
we are informed by M. Lagasca, that the latter species 
is also a native of Spain, as well as Barbary, and that 
he had always considered it specifically different from 
our present plant. • 

Our drawing was taken last Summer from plants at 
the Nursery of Mr. John Lee, of Hammersmith; it 
thrives well in the common garden soil, and if planted 
in a sheltered situation, or near a wall, might be readily 
protected by mats in severe weather : if grown in pots, 
a mixture of light turfy loam and peat will suit it very 
well, and they may be protected in a frame in Winter ; 
its flowers are produced in May and June, and s^eds 
are very frequently ripened, which may be sown and 
managed in the same manner as recommended under 
C. crispus. Cuttings also strike root freely, if planted 
under hand-glasses in September or October, the cut- 
tings to be made from the young shoots ; as soon as 
rooted, they should be potted separately in small pots ? 
which must be placed in a close frame until they nave 
made fresh roots ; they may then be hardened to the air 
by degrees, and will need the protection of a frame 
during the Winter. 



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87 



CISTUS asperifoliut. 

Rough-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Sick It Lkdow i a. SuprmfoL 1. 
frl. PedtmcuU*w*tforis,Qutviultijl0™ 
stqrii* cordatii acuminatis ; captnlis b-loaUaribut. 
* PedtmcuU$baHnudu,$^inJrd medium foliaoppori 



C.eiperifolius, fbliia aubaeatttibua ovato-lanceolatia agutia trinenriia 
rngoaia glabriuaculia margine undulatis aubdenticulatia ciliatis : aub- 
Utfl reticulata- venosis ; nervia venraque aspens, floribus cymoais, pe- 
danenlis calyeibusqite kirautia, petalis ixibricatis. 



Stem erect, much branched, forming a strong bushy 
shrub : branches spreading, erect, or ascending, very 
rough, thickly dotted with long spreading hairs, in- 
termixed with numerous very short rigid ones. Leaves 
opposite, sessile or nearly so, ovately lanceolate, acute, 
rugged, very much undulate at the margins, that are 
toothed with numerous minute teeth and fringed, ap- 
pearing smooth till examined by a glass, which shows 
that they are clothed with numerous very short hairs 
on the upper side, and longer ones underneath, parti- 
cularly on the nerves and veins : underneath 3-nerved 
from die base, where they are connected, the nerves 
much branched and reticulately veined, the nerves and 
veins very rough. Flowers white, in terminal cymes. 
Bractes ovate, or ovately lanceolate, acute, hairy, and 
fringed. Peduncles and pedicles cylindrical, very hairy. 
Calyx of 5 sepals ; the outer sepals broadly cordate, 
shortly acuminate, hairy and fringed: inner ones 
ovate, membranaceous, terminated in a long slender 
point Petals 5, spreading flat, imbricate, broadly 



obovate or obcordate, with a yellow spot at the base of 
each. Stamens about 100, spreading round : filaments 
smooth and yellow, unequal in length ; anthers yellow. 
Germen pubescent. Style very short. Stigma large, ca- 
pitate, 5-furrowed, papillose, covering the style. Cap- 
sule oblong, pubescent, 5-celled. Seeds conical, brown 
and glossy, about the size of rape seed. 

We do not find any description that agrees with the 
present plant, which may probably be a garden pro- 
duction; if so, it is probably intermediate between 
C. laxus and C. oblongifolins, or perhaps the latter with 
C. Cupanianus; from the two first it differs in the broad 
base of its leaves, which brings it nearer to the latter ; 
the habit of the plant, and its mode of flowering, is 
nearest to G. oblongifolius : it forms a handsome, strong, 
upright, evergreen shrub, and is quite hardy, produ- 
cing its flowers all the Summer, and till late in Au- 
tumn, when planted in the open ground, thriving well 
in a rich light soil ; and young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses in August, strike root freely ; it may also 
be raised from seeds. 

Our drawing was made last Summer from a plant at 
the Nursery of Mr, Golvill, King's-road, Chelsea. 



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70 



CISTUS Cupanianus. 
Heart-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Sect. II., Le don I A. Supra foil. 

§. 1. Pedunculis unifloris, aut muUiflorU cymosis; sepalis 6, ex- 
temis s&pius cordatis acuminatis ; capsulis 5-locularibus. 

* PedunculU basi nudis, scepd infrd medium folia oppoiita gerenti- 
but. 



C. Cupanianus, caule erecto, foliis petiolatis cordato-ovatis acutis 
rugosis reticulato-venosis supra scabris subtas fasciculato-pilosis 
margine fimbriatis, pedunculis pilosis 2-3-floris, sepalis villosis 
acuminatis, petalis imbricatis. 

Oistus Cupanianus. PresL ex Spreng. syst. v. 4. par. 2. p. 206. 



Stem shrubby, upright, much branched : branches 
spreading, when young slightly viscous, and clothed 
with long spreading white hairs, which wear off by age, 
and they then become smooth and brown. Leaves op- 
posite, petiolate, cordately ovate, acute, flat, more or 
less undulate at the margins, roughish, occasioned by 
the little tubercles on which the fascicles of hairs are 
fixed, strongly pennately nerved underneath, rugose, 
reticulately veined, of a dark green, and nearly smooth 
on the upper side, paler underneath, and thickly clo- 
thed with fascicles of hairs, as are the margins, where 
they are seated on little tubercles, which gives the ap- 
pearance of being denticulate or fimbriate. Petioles 
furrowed on the upper side, and rounded on the lower, 
broadest at the base, hairy. Peduncles Iongish, axil- 
lary, 2 or 3-flowered, thickly clothed with bunches of 
hairs spreading in various directions. Bractes 4 at the 
base of the peduncle, lanceolate, acute, opposite, cross 
ing each other, and a small deciduous one at the base 
of the pedicles. Pedicles hairy, nodding before the ex- 

t2 



pan8ioo of the flowers, erect when in bloom. Calyx of 
5 sepals, thickly clothed with rigid hairs, and shorter 
down underneath ; sepals taper-pointed, outer ones cor- 
date ; inner ones oblong or lanceolate, with membra- 
naceous margins. Petals 5, obcordate, narrow at the 
base, imbricate, flat, or slightly crumpled. Stamens 
about a hundred, spreading flat ; filaments unequal in 
length, smooth, yellow : pollen golden yellow. Oermen 
sericeous. Stigma very large, capitate, papillose, nearly 
sessile, and hiding the short Style. 

According to Sprengel, the present plant is a native 
of Sicily, and it is at present rather scarce iu our col- 
lections. It is nearly hardy, requiring protection only 
from the very severest frosts, and in sheltered situations 
would require no protection at all. It is nearest re- 
lated to C. salvifolius and C. corbariensis, but is of 
stronger growth than either of these, and of a different 
habit ; it is readily distinguished from the former by its 
cordate, acute leaves, and from the latter by its larger, 
broader, softer, and more hairy leaves, also by the shape 
and colour of its bractes, and different mode of growth. 
It thrives well in a light sandy soil, or if planted in the 
ground, the common garden soil will suit it very well; 
young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in August, 
strike root readily. 

Our drawing was made from a plant, at the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, in June last. 



& 




y 



67 



CISTUS oblongifolius. 
Oblong-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Sect II. Lbdoni A. Supra foL l. 

$. 1. Pednnculis unifloris, aut multifont cymotis, sepalis 5, exter- 
nissispiu* cordatisacuminatis; capsulia 5-locularibu*. 

* Pedunculis bari nudis, tctph infrd medium folia opporita gtreu- 
tibut. 



C. oblongifoHuM, canle fruticoso erecto; ramis hit pido-villoaia, fo- 
liia b renter petiolatis oblongo-lanceolatia obtaaia margin* pubea- 
oentibua et nndulatia aubtaa venoaia, pedunculis cjmotia, petalia 
concaria valde imbricatit • 



A large upright strong-growing Shrub, producing 
long straightish stiff branches, which are densely clo- 
thed with short villous down and long rigid hairs in- 
termixed. Leaves shortly petiolate, oblong, bluntish, 
reticulately veined, upper side smooth and glossy, un- 
der side paler, margins pubescent, and more or less 
undulate. Petioles very short, clasping the stem at the 
base, of a reddish brown, Flowers large, white, in a 
cymose panicle. Bractes sessile, crossing each other ; 
lower ones leaf-like, oblongly-lanceolate, bluntish; 
upper ones ovate, concave, acute, strongly nerved, sub- 
membranaceous, fringed. Pedicles unequal in length, 
nearly cylindrical, slightly viscous, thickly clothed with 
short spreading hairs and a few long ones intermixed. 
Calyx of 5 sepals, 2 outer ones much the largest, bracte- 
like, cordate, acute, striate, villosely hairy, margins 
fringed, reflexed : inner ones narrower, more membra- 
naceous, and taper-pointed, also villous. Petals 5, 
white, rather cupped, much imbricate, nearly round, 
with a yellow spot at the base of each. Stamens nume- 



rous, about 100, spreading, far overtopping the stigma: 
JUaments smooth, yellow. Germen densely villous. 
Style very short, scarcely any. Stigma very large, ca- 
pitate, rugged. 

The present plant, if allowed, will form a strong 
handsome evergreen shrub, if planted in the open bor- 
der, and appears to be quite hardy, a plant of it having 
stood in our garden in the open border for the two last 
Winters, without a single leaf being injured. It ap- 
pears to be a very distinct species, but we cannot find 
any description agree with it in any of the books that 
we have examined, though we know of no species with 
which it can be confounded ; we were at first inclined 
to believe it to be C. longifolius of Lamarck, but it has 
certainly but little affinity with that species, which we 
believe to be not at all different from C. kuvus. Being 
so hardy, it is well worth cultivating in every Shrub- 
bery, where it will flower the greater part of the Sum- 
mer. Cuttings of it strike root readily, planted under 
hand-glasses, in August or September, or it may be 
raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully. 

Our drawing was made from strong plants in the 
Nursery of Mr. Colvill, of the King's-road, Chelsea. 



x& 




20 



12 

CISTUS laxus. 
Broad waved-leaved Rock-Rose. 



Sect, II. Lbdonia. Supra, fol. 8. 

§ 1 . Pedunculis uni/brie, out muUifl&ru cymoris, gepali* 6, extent* 
stepiue cordatii acuminatu ; capsulis b-locularibus. 

** Pedunculis bracteatis, baei bracteoUs caduds parvulis concavii 
ccriaeeis subluieis decussatis, infra medium 2 oppositis majorihu. 



C. laxus, Mti» broviter petiolatis ovato-lanoeolatis aonminatis mar* 
gino undulatis anbdentioulatia aubglabris : snmmis hirti*, floribns 
cymosia, pedanoulis caljcibusqae birsutis, petalit oboordatis ralde 
imbricatit. 

Ciatns laxus. DC. prodr. 1. p. 266. Hort. Kew. ed\ 2. t>. 3. p. 805. 
WiUd. enum. 2. p. 668. Link enum 2. p. 74. Swt. hart. brit. p. 84. 
«. 20. Spreng. syst. veg. 2. p. 686. 



Stem shrubby, erect, not much branched : branches 
erect, or slightly spreading, with a green glossy bark : 
the young shoots thickly clothed with short woolly down, 
and long spreading hairs intermixed, more or less vis- 
cous. Leaves shortly petiolate, ovately lanceolate, 
taper-pointed, margins undulate, and slightly denticu- 
late, the teeth terminated by hairs, strongly 3-nerved 
from the base, reticulately veined on the lower side, and 
rugose on the upper: old leaves nearly smooth, young 
ones hairy on both sides and slightly viscous. Petioles 
clasping the stem at the base, but not connected, chan- 
nelled on the upper side, furrowed on each side, and 
keeled at the back. Peduncles axillary, villosely hairy, 
terminated by a paniculate cyme, clothed with small 
oblongly lanceolate, concave, acute, keeled bractes at 
the base, which are deciduous, and fall off before the 
expansion of the flowers : upper bractes larger, sessile, 
oblongly lanceolate, acute, concave, hairy, and fringed. 
Pedicles slender, cylindrical, villosely hairy. Calyx of 
5 sepals, very hairy: 2 outer ones largest, cordate, 



acute, the sides more or less turned back, much fringed : 
inner ones narrower, orate, concave, taper-pointed, the 
margins scarioee or membranaceous. Flowers rather 
cupped, of a paper white. Petals 5, obcordate, very 
much imbricate, more or less crumpled, with a light 
yellow spot at the base. Stamens about 80, spreading, 
the inner ones longest: filaments smooth, slender, of 
a pale yellow: pollen bright yellow, inclining to orange. 
Gertnen densely clothed with close pressed hairs. Style 
very short. Stigma large, capitate, slightly 5-lobed, 
tuberculate. 

Our drawing and description of this fine species 
were taken from plants kindly communicated to us from 
the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, 
at Fulham, in June last ; we have no doubt but it fcr the 
C. laxus of M. Decandolle, although it belongs to the 
same division of the section as CpopuUfolius and lon- 
glfolius, bearing small deciduous hractes at the base of 
the peduncles ; we believe the present plant, from the 
description, to be what is meant by Professor Spren- 
gel, for C. longifo&us, in his Systema Vegetabilium, 
bat very different from Decandolle's C. longifolius, of 
which we also have a drawing in our possession : the 
present plant is quite hardy, or only requires slight 
protection in very severe frost, thriving well in the 
common garden soil, but prefers rather a dryish situa- 
tion ; it may also be grown in pots, which can be pro- 
tected in a frame in severe frost, and may then be 
planted into the borders in spring ; if grown in pots, 
the best soil is an equal mixture of light turfy loam, 
and peat. Young cuttings taken off at a joint, and 
planted under hand-glasses in autumn, will strike root 
readily; it may also be increased by layers or seeds. 



L 




' 



2/ 



8 

CISTUS corbariensis. 

Mountain Rock-Rose* 



' Sect. II. Ledoni A. Supra, fol. I. 

§ 1. Pednncnlis unijhris, out multi/foris eymotit; $epaH* 5, ex- 
tents 9api&$ cordatis acuminatis ; captuli* &-locularibut. 

* PeduneulU basi nudis, topi infra* medium folia opposita geren- 
tibus. 



C. corbariensis, foliis petiolatis snbcordatis ovatis acuminatis mar- 
rine fimbriatis ntrinqne rngosis leviter glutinosis, pednncnlis 
longis 1-5-floris, petalis basi imbricatis apice paten ti bus. 

Cistns corbariensis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 265. Pert. syn. 2. p. 74. 
Hort. tub. land. p. 123. Link enum. 2. p. 73. Swt. hart. brit. 
p. 34. n. 15. Spreng. syst. veg. 2. p. 586. 

Cistns hybridan Pourr. chlor. narb. p. 30. uec Vahl. 

Cistns salvifolias 0. DC. fl.fr. 4. p. 813. 



Stem shrubby, erect, much branched, clothed with 
a brown glossy bark, more or less warted : branches 
opposite, spreading, thickly clothed with leaves, smooth 
or slightly pubescent. Leaves opposite, cordate at the 
base, ovate, tapering to a point, points a little reflexed, 
reticulately nerved and rugose, of a dark glossy green 
on the upper side, and stellately pubescent underneath, 
slightly glutinous, margins fimbriate with tufts of short 
hairs. Petioles clothed with a stellate pubescence, and 
fringed with longer hairs, channelled on the upper 
side and rounded on the lower, widened at the base 
and clasping the stem. Peduncles 1 to 5-flowered, ax- 
illary, slender, stellately pubescent, nodding before the 
flowers expand, then becoming erect. Bractes deci- 
duous, cordately ovate, acute, bluntly keeled, pubes- 
cent and ciliate. Pedicles thickly clothed with a starry 
pubescence, at first nodding, then becoming erect. 
Calyx of 5 sepals ; outer ones largest, cordate, acute, 
the margins a little recurved ; inner ones membrana- 
ceous, concave, mucronate. Petals 5, spreading flat, 



imbricate at the base, the points spreading, obovate or 
obcordate, slightly crumpled, the margins slightly 
curved upwards, white with a yellow spot at the base, 
and tinged with red at the points. Stamens about 100, 
spreading: filaments short, smooth, straw-coloured: 
anthers 2 -eel led, attached near the base by their back 
to the filaments : pollen orange-coloured. Gertnen se- 
riceous. Stigma very large, capitate, papillose, nearly 
sessile, and hiding the style. 

Our drawing of this plant was taken at the Nursery 
of Mt. Colvill, in June last ; it is one of the hardiest 
species of the genus, thriving well in the common gar- 
den soil, and in any situation where it is not too moist, 
continuing to bloom for about two months, and each 
day covered with a profusion of handsome white flowers, 
whose margins are tinged with rose ; the rose-coloured 
buds are also very pretty, before the flowers expand : 
plants grown in pots make very handsome snug bushes, 
and have a lively appearance when in bloom ; a mix- 
ture of loam and peat suits it very well; and young 
cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, root without 
difficulty. 

This species is a native of mountains in the south of 
France and Spain, and is sold in the nurseries under 
the name of C. populifolius minor, but is in reality much 
nearer related to C. salvifolius than to that species; 
the C. populifolius p minor of Decandolle, which is the 
C. populifolius of Cavanilles, is the C. populifolius 
major of the Gardens, but is very different from C. po- 
pulifolius a major of Decandolle, a native of Mauri- 
tania, of which we have a drawing taken from a plant 
at the Nursery of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, the only 
one that we have ever seen in a living state ; but fine 
specimens of it are preserved in Mr. Lambert's Her- 
barium ; it is certainly a very different species from 
C. populifolius, and we believe no person would con- 
sider them as belonging to the same that had an oppor- 
tunity of comparing them when growing together; 
we therefore propose to name it C. latifolius. 



^-£ 




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22 



78 

CISTUS acutifolius. 
Acute-leaved Rock-Rose. 



C. acutifolius, foliis cordato-ovatis acutis baai trioerriis reticulato- 
venosis utrinque pubescentibus, ramis virgatis diffusis subproatra- 
iis, peduncalis tomentosis subtrifloris, sepalis cordatis acutis niti- 
dis subpiloflis ciliatia, petalU obcordatis baai imbricatia. 

Cistus aa|?ifolioa humifusus. DC. prodr. 1 . p. 205 1 



Stem shrubby, branched, spreading : branches long 
and slender, scarcely strong enough to support their 
own weight, when young clothed with a short tomen- 
tnm, and stellate bunches of hairs, more or less of a 
purple tinge, older ones becoming rough, by the little 
tubercles on which the bunches of hairs have been 
seated. Leaves ovate, acute, sometimes cordate and 
sometimes rounded at the base, spreading flat when 
full grown, afterwards becoming undulate and the 
sides folded inwards, slightly rugose, 3-nerved at the 
base, reticulately veined, clothed on both sides and the 
margins with numerous tufts of short hairs, upper side 
of a darkish green, paler underneath : young leaves of 
a hoary appearance, and undulate. Petioles short, di- 
lated at the base, channelled on the upper side, and 
convex below, hairy. Peduncles axillary, generally 
3-flowered, rough, clothed with a short tomentum and 
numerous little tufts of hairs. Bractes ovate, acute, 
opposite, besides some small ones at the base of the 
pedicles that are deciduous. Pedicles cylindrical, nod- 
ding before the flowers expansion, afterwards erect, 
tomentosely hairy. Calyx of 5 sepals, more or less, 
purple, glossy, a little hairy and fringed, acute, .outer 
ones broadly cordate, inner ones ovate. Petals 5, ob- 
cordate, white, yellow at the bottom, imbricate at the 
base, the points distinct. Stamens numerous, spread- 

x2 



ing, unequal in length: filaments yellow. Capsule 
large, glossy, clothed with short hairs. Stigma large, 
sessile, capitate, tuberculate. 

This is probably the plant meant by M. Decandolle 
as C. salmfolius j3 humtfusus, as it is the most trailing 
of any of the genus that we are acquainted with, by 
which character, its slender shoots, and acute leaves, it 
is readily distinguished from that species and all others, 
approaching nearer to C Cupanianus, but that is a 
much stronger upright growing plant, with much 
larger leaves, and of a brighter green ; we have there- 
fore no doubt but the present is as good a species as 
any of the others. It is a free growing but dwarf plant, 
quite hardy, and thrives well in a light sandy soil, con- 
tinuing to flower successively nearly all the Summer, 
and ripens its seeds; young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses in Autumn, strike root readily. 

Our drawing was made from a plant, at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill, King's-road, Chelsea. 



2.3 




-Z3 



54 



CISTUS salvifolius. 
Sage-leaved Rock- Rose. 



Sect II. Ledonia. Supra fol.l 

§ 1. Peduncnlis unifloris, aut multifloru eymosit; sepaHs5, txter- 
frit utpnU cordatu acuminatis ; captuljs &-locularibu$. 

• Pedmnculis ba$i nudit, scept infrd medium folia oppotita geren- 
tibus. 



C. sahifolius, foliis petiolatis ovatis obtnsis rngosis subttis tomento- 

818, peduncalis longis tomentoso-albicantibus unifloris saperne ar- 

ticulatis solitariis. DC.prodr. 1. p. 265. 
Cistus salvifolius. Linn. $pec. 738. WiUden. tp.pL 2. p. 1184. Pert. 

tyn. % p. 75. Cavan. ic. 2. p. 31. 1. 137. Jacq. coll. 2. p. 120. /. 8. 

Sprang. sy$t. 2. p. 586. Smith Fior. gnec. t. 4D7. 



Stem shrubby ,compact,much branched ; branches erect 
or spreading,densely clothed with bunches of woolly hairs 
when young, but losing them and becoming rough when 
older, the roughness occasioned by the little tubercles on 
which the hairs have been seated . Leaves petiolate, ovate, 
obtuse or rounded at the points, becoming narrow to- 
wards the base, more or less rugose, reticulately veined, 
clothed with fascicles of short hairs on the upper side, 
and of woolly ones underneath, of a pale green colour, 
hoary when young, margins sometimes a little undulate, 
clothed all round with stellate tufts of hairs. Petioles 
short and broadish, channelled on the upper side, and 
rounded below, green or sometimes purple, slightly- 
winged. Peduncles axillary, jointed, one-flowered, dense- 
ly clothed with short woolly hairs. Bractes 2 or 4 near 
the base of the peduncle, opposite, broadly lanceolate 
or ovate, acute. Calyx of 5 sepals, tuberculately rough, 
clothed with short hairs, and fringed with stellate bunch- 
es : 3 outer ones broadly cordate, acute, spreading at the 
points : the 2 inner ones ovate, concave, taper-pointed, 

p2 



Petals 5, white, imbricate at the base, obcordate. Sta- 
mens about 100 : filaments unequal in length, spreading, 
yellow : pollen yellow. Oertnen clothed with a short thin 
pubescence. Stigma sessile, large, capitate, granular. 

A great many different species are sold by the name 
of G. saJvifolius at different Nurseries, scarcely any of 
the Nurserymen knowing the real plant, though it is 
very readily distinguished from all others, by its solitary 
one-flowered jointed peduncles, and its obtuse leaves, 
that are not cordate at the base, and it cannot be easily 
confused with any other. It is a native of several parts 
of Europe, and succeeds well in the open air in a shel- 
tered situation, thriving well in the common garden soil, 
or, if grown in pots, a mixture of sandy loam and peat 
will suit it very well. Young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses, any time from the latter end of July, to 
the beginning of September, will root freely ; they may 
also be raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance. 

Our drawing was made from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill, last Summer. 



2*. 



&. 



i 




I 



24 



42 

CISTUS obtusifolius. 
Blunt-leaved Cretan Rock-Rase. 



Scot II. Ledonia. Supra foLS. 

§ I. Pedunculii uniflori$ 9 aui muliifiorU cymosu; tepalia 5, eafor- 
%is MTOtw oordatis acuminatis ; capsulia 5-locularibus. 

♦ Pedunculit baH nudis, uepe infrd medium folia opposite geren- 
Jtihts. 



C» obtusifolhu, foliis subsessilibus basi attenuatis ovato-oblongis ob~ 
tusis rugosis stellato-pubescentibns margioe subdcnticulatis, po* 
duncolis terminal i bus cymoso-multifloris, sepalis extorioribus lato- 
cordatis acatis, petalis obcordatis imbricatis. 

Cistas obtusifolius. Swt. kort. brit. add* p. 4G8. ft. 80. Coh. cataL 
HtiLXp.Z4.coL2. 



Stem shrubby, dwarf, very much branched, spread- 
ing in all djirectiftftfc : branches spreading, ascending, 
thickly clothed with a st&rry pubescence, or fascicles of 
stellate hairs. Leaves opposite, sessile, or nearly so* 
ovately oblong, obtuse, or with rounded points, attenu- 
ated at the base into a sort of short footstalk, slightly 
3-nerved, rugose, retkulately veined, very rough and 
rigid, clothed on both sides with a starry pubescence* 
or clusters of short hairs, of a dark green on the upper 
side, and lighter underneath, margins slightly denticu- 
late, and fringed with tufts of short hairs : upper leaves 
quite sessile, and embracing the stem. Flowers termi- 
nal in a many-flowered cyme. Pedicles rather short and 
stout, cylindrical, clothed with a white canescence, and 
longer hairs intermixed. Calyx of 5 sepals, the outer 
ones broadly cordate, acute, hairy on both sides, the 
margins slightly reflexed : inner ones ovate, taper-point- 
ed or mucronate, with scariose membranaceous mar- 
gins. Petals 5, obcordate, a little crumpled, white, with 
a yellow spot at the base, imbricate at the base, the points 
spreading. Stamens about 100, spreading, overtopping 

m 2 



the stigma : filaments unequal in length, slender, bright 
yellow. Germen clothed with silky hairs. Style very 
short, erect, hid by the large, capitate, slightly 5-lobed, 
papillose Stigma. 

We have seen some fine specimens of this plant in 
the Herbarium of A. B. Lambert, Esq. who received 
them from Crete under the name of C. salvifolius, but it 
is very different from that species, or any other with 
which we are acquainted ; it forms a pretty little com- 
pact bush, which is covered with flowers a good part of 
the Summer ; the plants that we have seen have not been 
more than a foot to eighteen inches in height, and very 
bushy, and it appears to be one of the dwarfest grow- 
ing species of the genus. 

Being a native of Crete, it requires a little shelter in 
severe frost, either to be covered with mats, or some 
other covering, if planted in the open ground : but if 
grown in pots, it may be protected in a frame or Green- 
house in frosty weather, and can then be turned out in 
the borders in Spring. It thrives well in any light sandy 
soil, or a mixture of light sandy loam and peat will suit 
it very well. Young cuttings, planted under hand- 
glasses in August or September, will strike root readily. 

Our drawing was made at the Nursery of Messrs. 
Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham ; and it was 
most probably first introduced from Greece by Dr. Sib- 
thorp, and has been in our collections ever since, with- 
out being noticed as a distinct species. 



2S 




■ Jj^WTly 



2S 



19 

CISTUS hirsutus. 
Hairy Rock-Rose. 

Sect IL Lbdonia. Smpra,foL 8. 

i» 1. Pcduncalis uniJlorU, ami multijlcru egmotu: sepalisft, e»- 
temis Hatpins cordatis acuminatis ; capsalis b-locularibus. 

* PeduncuRs basi nudis, sctpt infra medium foUa opposite gtren- 
tibus. 



C. Asrmftif, foliis sesailibus oblongii obtusis hirantis basi trinerriis, 
pedunculis brevibu* uniflorj* ant oymoso-multifloiis, capsulia 
parvifi calyce maximo hirsute et pyramidali tectis, petalis rotun- 
dato-obcordatis imbricatis. 

Cistus hirsatas. DC. prodr. 1. p. 265. Lam. diet. 2. p. 17. WUUen. 
enurn. 2. p. 668. Link ennm. 2. p. 74. Swt. hart. brit. p. 94. 
n. 19. Spreng. syst. 2. p. 680.— C/«#. Aw*. £«&>*. 4. 



£* em shrubby, very much branched : branches spread- 
ing, thickly clothed with unequal spreading hairs. 
Leaves opposite, sessile, oblong, obtuse, more or less 
undulate, 3-nerved at the base, rugose, strongly nerved 
underneath, the nerves much branched, hairy on both 
sides, the margins fringed : upper ones much broader 
than the lower ones, particularly towards their base, 
and more hairy, also more strongly 3-nerved. Flowers 
terminal, generally cymose, seldom solitary. Pedicles 
short, villosely hairy, slightly viscous, cylindrical. Ca- 
lyx large, broad at the base, with a taper point, or py- 
ramidal ; sepals 5, villosely hairy, the hairs white and 
spreading: outer ones very broadly cordate, acute, 
leafy, their margins recurved or revolute: inner ones 
smaller, ovate, with taper points, their margins mem- 
branaceous. Petals 5, obovate or obcordate, imbricate, 
white, yellow at the base. Stamens about 100, unequal 
in length, spreading, far overtopping the stigma: fila- 
ments smooth, pale yellow : pollen bright yellow. Ger- 
men rough, pubescent. Style very short, erect. Stigma 
large, capitate. 



This pretty plant is a native of Spain, and some other 
parte of the* South of Europe, and is readily distin- 
guished from all others by its very large pyramidal 
calyx and small capsules; it is often confused with 
C. laxus in the nurseries ; but a comparison of our 
figures will readily distinguish them. The present 
plant is hardy enough to bear our Winter* in the open 
borders without protection, except very severe ones, 
when a mat placed round it will preserve it well; but 
this is very seldom needed : when grown in the ground 
it is much more robust than the plant from which our 
drawing was made, which was grown in a pot ; it pro- 
duces a great profusion of flowers, which continue to 
expand in succession for a considerable time. 

Our drawing was taken at the Nursery of Messrs. 
Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham, last Summer, 
where we have also obtained drawings of many very 
rare, and some quite new species : the present plant 
thrives well in the common garden soil ; or if grown 
^in pots, it succeeds best in a mixture of sandy loam 
and peat. Young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses 
in August or September, or any time between that and 
the middle of February, will strike root freely ; when 
they are rooted, they must be managed as mentioned 
under C.purpureus; young plants may also be raised 
from seeds, which ripen plentifully. 



Zdf 




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f.^j*Ur* 



^ 



47 

CISTUS platysepalus. 

Broad sepaled Rock- Rose. 



Sect II. Ledonia. Supra fol 1. 

$. 1. Peduncnlis unifloris, ant multifont cwmo$i$, sopalis 5, exta- 
nt* somas eordatis acuminatis ; capsulis b-locularibus. 
• PedumcaUsbasinudis, scspi infra medium folia opposite gertn- 



C. platusepahu, foliis oblongo-lanceolatis aessilibus trinerviis ragout 
utrinque ? illotio-piloftis, pediinoalis cymosu caljcibasque villosis, 
sepalis acuminate extorioribus latocordatis, petalis obcordatis 
distinctly 

Cistas platysepalua. Swt. hart, brit add. p. 468. u. 31. 



Stem shrubby, very much branched : branches spread- 
ing in all directions, erect or ascending, thickly clothed 
with long spreading villous white hairs. Leaves lan- 
ceolate, or oblongly-lanceolate, sessile, 3-nerved from 
the base, rugose, reticulately veined underneath, clo- 
thed on both sides with long villous hairs, the mar- 
gins fringed : lower ones bluntish and narrowest ; 
upper ones broad at the base, ovately lanceolate, many 
nerved and acute. Flowers terminal, in a branching 
cyme. Peduncles thickly clothed with villous spread- 
ing hairs. Bractes leaf-like, deciduous, ovate or ovately 
lanceolate, acute. Pedicles short, scarcely as long as 
the calyx, villous. Calyx of 5 sepals, the outer ones 
broadly cordate, taper-pointed, villosely hairy on both 
sides, and fringed, the margins bent back a little: 
inner ones narrower, oblong or ovate, taper-pointed, 
concave, membranaceous, villous at the back, and 
smooth inside. Petals 5, distinctly spreading, not im- 
bricate, obcordate, more or less crumpled, narrow at 
the base, white with a small yellow spot at the base. 
Stamens numerous, about 80, very unequal in length, 
overtopping the stigma : filaments slender, smooth and 



yellow: pollen yellow. Germen hairy. Style short, 
erect. Stigma large, capitate, papillose, covering the 
short style, like an umbrella. 

The present plant is generally confused with C. mons- 
peliensis in our gardens, though no two plants need be 
more distinct, and it is much nearer related to C. hir- 
sttfus. It is a native of Crete, as we have ascertained 
by fine specimens in Mr. Lambert's Herbarium re- 
ceived from that country, and also marked C. monspe- 
liensis ; but a comparison with our figure of that spe- 
cies, or the figure in the Flora Graeca, will easily 
decide the difference ; we do not know when the pre- 
sent plant was introduced, but it was most probably 
brought by Dr. Sibthorp on his return from Greece. 

We have not yet been fortunate enough to find 
C. creticus in any collection that we have visited, and 
fear that it is quite lost to the country ; but it may 
probably still exist in some collection ; should any of 
our Subscribers or their friends possess the plant, we 
should feel much obliged for specimens of it when in 
flower, the plant now known in Nurseries by that 
name being C. purpureas. 

As the present plant is a native of Crete, it requires 
a little protection in severe frosty weather, either the 
covering of a mat, or to be protected in a frame, thriv- 
ing well in a light sandy soil, and may be increased by 
seeds, or young cuttings planted under hand-glasses 
in August or September, will soon strike root. 

Our drawing was made at the Nursery of Messrs. 
Whitley, Brames, and Milne, near Parsons Green, 
Fulham. 



zy 



S3. 







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*7 



33 

CISTUS psilosepalus. 
Smooth Sepaled Rock-Rose. 



Sect II. Lbdonia. Supra, fol.l. 

§ 1. Pedanculis vnifloris, out muUiJloru cymotu, sepalis 5, exle- 
rioru $cepiu$ cordatis acuminatis ; capsnlis b-locularibus. 

* PeduncuU* ban nudis, $apt infra* medium folia opposita geren- 
tUnu* 



C. psilo$epalut, foliis breviter petiolatis oblongo-lanceolatis acatis 
margine nndulatis subdenticulatis ciliatis trinerviis subhirsntis, 
floribus subcymosis, pedanculis tomentoso-hirsutis, sepalis long© 
acuminatis glabris nitidis margine ciliatis, petalis latis cuneatis 
imbricatis. 

Cistns psilosepalus. SwL hart. brit. addenda. p.4QQ. 



' Stem shrubby, much branched ; branches spreading, 
roughish, of rather a rusty appearance, thickly clothed 
with tufts of longish rigid hairs. Leaves on the stem 
with short footstalks, oblongly lanceolate, acute, three- 
nerved underneath, reticulately veined, of rather a 
glossy green on the upper side and paler underneath, 
hairy on both sides, the hairs underneath in little tufts ; 
margin much undulate, rough or a little denticulate, 
and fringed with tufts of short hairs, and some longer 
ones intermixed : the leaves on the flower-stems sessile, 
connected at the base, more prominently three-nerved, 
and the points less sharp. Flower-stems axillary and 
terminal, also clothed with tufts of short hairs, and 
some long ones intermixed. Peduncles clothed with 
tufts of short woolly hairs, and some longer ones inter- 
mixed. Calyx of 5 sepals, the 3 outer ones broadly 
cordate, with long taper points, striated with nume- 
rous faint lines, which are branched a little, smooth 
and glossy, the margins fringed; inner ones ovate, 
membranaceous, with long subulate points. Petals 5, 

K 



broadly wedge shaped, very much imbricate, of a 
texture and much crumpled, of a pure white withu 
faint yellow mark at the base of each. Stamens nume- 
rous, about 150, spreading: filaments smooth, pale 
yellow, of various lengths ; pollen yellow. Germen to- 
mentose. Style very short, quite hid by the large capi- 
tate, slightly 5-lobed, papillose Stigma. 

Our drawing of this plant was taken from one grow- 
ing in the open border, at the Nursery of Mr. Lee, at 
Hammersmith, in July last; it appears to us to be 
quite new and nondescript, differing from all others 
with which we are acquainted by its smooth glossy 
sepals, and also in the shape of its leaves, approaching 
the nearest to C. longifolius, but still very different 
from that species; the plants were very bushy, and the 
shoots were terminated by large cymes of white flowers, 
which open in succession, and make a fine contrast 
with the dark green leaves with which the plants are 
clothed. It succeeds well in the common garden soil, 
in rather a dry situation, and would thrive well on 
rock-work ; or if grown in pots, a mixture of sandy 
loam and peat would suit it very well. Cuttings planted 
under hand-glasses in Autumn, strike root freely. 



z# 




JZcf 



59 

CISTUS florentiou8. 
Florentine Rock-Rose. 



Soot II. Lbdonia. Sv/mafoL 1. 

§. I. Pedojaoolii unifier is, nut multtflorU cymoiu ; 9*pali$ 6, ester, 
nis sapiiii carditis acuminatis ; capsutis fr-loculari&us. 

* Pedunculis ban nudu, sapi infrd medium folia opporita geren- 
tibw. 



C.fiorentinus, foliig lanceolatis rugosis reticulato-vonosis snbsesaili- 
fras, pedunculis villosis subtrifloris, sopalis-longo aoumiiiatis pi- 
losis, petalis imbricatis. 

Cistos florontinns. Lam. diet. 2. p. W. DC.prodr.l.p.Mb. S*>t, 
hort.brit.p.$4. Spreny*sytt,2. p,b85. 



Stem shrubby, much branched : branches crowded, 
spreading, erect, or ascending, more or less tinged with 
purple; when young clothed with bunches of hairs, 
which are unequal in length, and are seated on a little 
tubercle ; older branches glossy but rough, occasioned 
by the little tubercles on which the hairs had been seat- 
ed. Leaves linearly lanceolate or sometimes oblongly 
lanceolate, undulate, acute, tapering to the base, upper 
ones sessile and broad at the base ; lower ones taper- 
ing to the base into a sort of footstalk, 1 -nerved, pen- 
nately and reticulately veined, the points a little recur- 
ved ; when young clothed with numerous bunches of 
short hairs, and a sort of thin tomentum underneath, 
the hairs mostly curved upwards towards the point, 
stiff and rigid, which causes a roughness ; old ones be- 
coming smooth and glossy, and more or less tinged with 
purple. Bractes or leaves on the flower-stem, sessile, 
three-nerved from the base. Peduncles and pedicles 
clothed with spreading hairs and shorter down inter- 
mixed, which gives them a hoary appearance, the pe- 



duncles 2 or 3-flowered. Flowers white. Calyx of 5 se- 
pals, which are villosely hairy, and taper to a long slen- 
der point, the outer ones cordate at the base, and the 
margins slightly reflexed, more or less tinged with pur- 
ple : inner ones narrower. Petals 5, white, tinged with 
red at the points, and a yellow spot at the base, broadly 
obovate, imbricate their whole length, spreading flat, or 
sometimes slightly cupped. Stamens numerous, spread- 
ing, unequal in length '.filaments short, smooth, yellow : 
pollen golden yellow. Mermen tomentose. Stigma capi- 
tate, sessile, very large, tuberculate. 

Our drawing of this rare and very distinct species 
was made at the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, 
and Milne, in July last, the only collection in which 
we have ever seen it ; but we hope it will now soon be- 
come more plentiful, as it forms a pretty upright bush, 
and makes a neat appearance when covered with bloom ; 
we suspect it will also bear our Winters, without pro- 
tection, particularly if placed in a sheltered situation, 
thriving well in any light sandy soil ; and young cut- 
tings, planted under hand-glasses, in August or Sep- 
tember, will strike root freely. 



?j> 



2.1 




*j *^ fcJ, *p j^ i/A 4 



*? 



27 

CISTUS monspeliensis, 
Montpelier Rock-Rose. 



Sect UL Luiwnia. S*pm,foL U 

V 1. Pedsscolia untfloru, out multifiorU cymo$U; Mp*G* 5, <*- 

fitt %tpto cordatit acmmtMtiM ; cipsutis 5-*>c«fortfacs. 

• P4d***M* ben midfa, M^i^Mcihim/oitocypMlte^irMi. 



C to^qwfiqi ri ^ cud* ©recto r*au>s<>, folife aaguato4anc#dUti« n* 
goais irinerriif viacoaia anbtaa reticularis aeaailibua, pedvncnlii 
tarminalibaa viUosis subcympsis, tepalis parvia YtHoap-riacoaia, 
petalia tborafto-euneatia baai ittMoatti. 

Cfctas nmutpfllta** IAmunmc 999. D£K fm*. L. m. M*. 
WiUdm.*p.pL%.p.lV** Pcrs.$ 9 *%p.l^ Hm.Xm.ed.% 
v.9. p. 805, Flor. grmc t. 4S& 



Stem shrubby, ^rect, straight, clothed with a brown 
glossy bark, branching: branches erect, hairy, and 
slightly viscous. Leaves opposite, sessfle, narrowly 
lanceolate, acute, or scarcely obtuse, very much rugose 
or wrinkled, three-nerved from the base,, underneath 
reticulately wrinkled, viscous, covered on both sides 
with tufts of short brown hairs and long simple ones 
intermixed, of a dark green on the upper side, and of a 
brown rusty colour underneath ; those at the base of 
the peduncles broader at the base, more strongly nerved 
and sharper pointed. Peduncles terminal, on the small 
shoots 3, 4, and 5-flowered, on the terminal ones cy- 
mose, and from 10to20-flowered, thickly clothed with 
spreading unequal clammy hairs, as are the pedicles 
and sepals. Pedicles short, scarcely as long as the 
sepals. Calyx of 5 sepals, the outer ones rather largest, 
ovate, acute, clammy and thickly clothed with long 
spreading hairs ; inner ones narrower, concave, sharper 
pbinted, also very hairy. Petals 5, obcordate, or 



broadly cuneate, imbricate a great way up, a little 
crumpled, scarcely twice the length of the calyx, white 
with a yellow spot at the base. Stamens very short, 
but overtopping the stigma, about 50 : filaments une- 
qual in length, smooth, yellow. Germe* pubescent. 
Style short, straight. Stigma large, capitate, granular. 
The present species is not a common inhabitant of 
our collections, and another species, a native of Crete, 
is often confused with and sold for it at the Nurseries, 
although no two plants of a section can well be more 
dissimilar; we have also seen them confused in the 
Herbariums ; and in a collection of Cretan specimens 
lately received by Mr. Lambert were fine specimens of 
it, marked C. monspeUensis, though it is much nearer 
related to C. hirsutus. As the present plant is so scarce 
in collections, we are inclined to believe that it is more 
tender than some other species, particularly as it is a 
handsome growing plant, and an abundant bloomer; 
it should therefore be planted in a warm border, or 
where it can receive some protection in severe weather. 
Plants of it may be grown in pots, and can then be 
protected in frames in Winter; it succeeds well in any 
rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat 
will suit it very well. Cuttings planted under hand- 
glasses in Autumn will strike root readily, but the 
glasses must not be kept too close on them for any 
length of time, or they will be very liable to damp and 
turn mouldy. Our drawing was taken from a plant at 
the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, in August last. 



3# 



f 




Ai &> JAJtymay. Ji^jsu. 



WmUdiu 



30 



32 

CISTUS Clusii. 
Cliuiuss Rock-Rose. 



Sect II. Lbdonia. Supra, foL 1. 

§ 2. Pednncnlis bracteatis, bracteis dadacu dectliMtis, inferi&ri- 
bui ninoribui nnifloru, axillaribu* tolitari* vel termindiibus umbel* 
iaiis: calycibus 3-6 $cpali$; capsulis 6-10 foeutaribu*. 

*• Stigmaie capitato parvo, itylo cyHndrico itaminUms nUxefuali. 



C. Chtsii, caule fraticoso subbrtcfo ramoso, fcliis snbtrinerviis li- 
nearibus margine revolntis sttbt&s subcaaescentibus, floribus sab- 
capitatis, calyce 8-5~sepalo piloso ; sepalis o?atis acntis exterio- 
ribui minoribus, capsulis 6-locularibos. 

Cistns Clusii. Dunalin DC. prodr. 1. p. 22*. Swi. hurt. brit. p. 34. 
tt.28. 

Cistns Libanoth 0. Lam. die* 2. p. 18w Desf.f. atl. 1»> 412. amsL 



Ledon VII. Chu. hist. 1. p. 80. tc. 



Stem shrubby, erect or spreading, much branched: 
branches spreading, hispidly hairy, when old clothed 
with a dark brown scaly bark; young ones thickly 
clothed with unequal, spreading, soft white hairs. 
Leaves opposite, sessile, connate, clasping the stem, 
crossing each other, linear, bluntish or rarely acute, 
three-nerved from the base* more or less rugose, reti- 
culately veined, margins a little rolled back, entire, 
young ones hairy on both sides, old ones of a dark 
green, and rather glossy on the upper side, slightly 
canescent and tomentose underneath. Panicles brac- 
teate, at first capitate, afterwards lengthening out, 
thickly clothed with spreading villous hairs, as are the 
peduncles, bractes, and calyx. Bractes ovate, acute, 
lower ones leaf-like, crossing each other, like the leaves, 
generally longer than the peduncles. Peduncles gene- 
rally 3 or 4-flowered, with a small Ovate, fringed, deci- 
duous bracte at the base. Pedicles slender, villous. 



Calyx of 3, 4, or 5 sepals, when more than 3, the outer 
ones are smallest : sepals ovate, acute, villous, fringed, 
margins more or less membranaceous. Petals 5, white, 
with a yellow spot at the base, imbricate at the base 
and distinct at the points, obovate or obcordate, very 
slightly crenulate, about half an inch long, and nearly 
the same in breadth. Stamens from 30 to 40, spreading, 
the inner ones longest, about the length of the style : 
filaments yellow: anthers orange-coloured. Germen 
conical, densely tomentose. Style smooth, narrow at 
the base and thickened upwards. Stigma capitate, 
slightly 5-lobed, granular. 

The present species is described as 3-sepalous in M. 
Decandolle's Prodromus, but the calyx varies with from 
3 to 5 sepals, and this is also represented in Clusius's 
figure. It forms a handsome snug compact bush, and 
is pretty hardy, as it will stand the Winter well in a 
sheltered situation, thriving best in a dry sandy soil, 
and producing abundance of its neat little white flow* 
ers ; it is a very different species from any other, ap- 
proaching the nearest to C. rnonspeliensis, and is at 
present very little known ; it is also a scarce plant ; 
but we hope it will now come into notice, as it is de- 
serving a place in every collection. Cuttings of it root 
freely, if planted under hand-glasses. The beginning 
of the present month, and from that time to the latter 
end, is as good a time as any for planting cuttings of 
all the different sorts ; they will then stnke root, and 
may be potted off before the Winter sets in. 

Our drawing was made from a plant communicated 
by Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, last Summer. 



Si- 



te 




3/ 



84 

CISTUS ladaniferus a. albiflorus. 
White-flowered flat-leaved Gum Cislus. 



Sect II. Ledonia. Supra foil. 

§ 2. Pedunculis bracteatu, bracteis caducis decussatis, infcrioribus 
minoribus uni/loris, axillaribus solitariis vel terminalibus utnbellatu ; 
cahfcibusS-sepalis; capsuhi b-lO-hcularibus. 
* SHgmate magno teuili. 



C. ladaniferus, foliis planis snbsessilibus baai oonnatis lineari-lan- 
ceolatis trinerviis supra glabris nitidis subtas tomentosis retiou- 
lato-renosis, capsulis 10-loonLaribas. Supra foL 1. 

Cistus ladaniferus. Linn. spec 737. Pen. syn. 2. p. 76. Link enum. 
2. p. 74. DC. prodr. 1. p. 206. Spreng. sgst. 2. p. 665. 

«• aibijlonu, petalis omnmo albis. Leqon 1* Chts, hist. 1. p. 79* ic. 
Supra, 

0. maculates, petalis albis, basi macula atrosangtunea notatis. Supra 
/oL 1.1.1. 



£fem shrubby, erect, branching : branches slender, 
thickly clothed with a glossy viscous substance. Leaves 
nearly sessile, slightly connected at the base, flat, some- 
times reflexed, linearly lanceolate, acute, 3-nerved from 
the base; upper side smooth and shining, viscous; clo- 
thed underneath with a white dense tomentum, reticu- 
lately veined. Flowers terminating the branches, soli- 
tary, large, white. Bractes 6, opposite, crossing each 
other : the four lower ones leaf-like, dilated and con- 
cave at the base, fringed ; 2 upper ones membranace- 
ous, obovate, taper-pointed, concave, ciliate. Calyx of 
3 sepals, that are cordately ovate, acute, concave, stria- 
ted, fringed on one side; the other side smooth. xV 
tals 5, broadly obovate, margins uneven, white, tinged 
with yellow a little above the base. Stamens numerous ; 
filaments smooth, attached to the base of the anthers, 



and overtopping the stigma : pollen yellow. Gertnen 
tomentose. Stigma large, sessile, capitate. 

Our drawing of the present variety was made from a 
plant at the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, in the King's-road ; 
it requires precisely the same sort of treatment as the 
spotted flowered variety figured at folio 1. requiring a 
little protection in Winter, as it is much more tender 
than C. cyprius. It thrives best in a light sandy soil, 
and may be propagated by layers, or from seeds, that 
ripen in abundance. 



32 




# *w <te r JUfy*XM>&**&/6fr *£***&& JU?./J£25. 



■ 



32 



CISTUS ladaniferiis p. nuumiatt*. 

Spotted-flowered jlat-leqved Gum Cistus. 

CISTUS. Calyx 6-sepalus, sepalis duplici serie dispositis, 2 ex* 
ternis infequalibus, interdum najlift. Pefala 6, oequalia, subcmneata, 
caduca. foautfaa nnmerosa, ssepe e disco glandaloeo exserta. 
Sfyto filiformis. Stigtta oapitatum. Captula catyce obtocta, 
ljOMnlooularis, valvis 10-6* medio septiferis. Semina ovato-an£u- 
lata. Embryo filiformis spiralis. — Folia oppotita exstipulata integra 
vel datficulaH. . Pedunculi eotlfare*, nut ml multijfori. Semiaa 
er asfo C. mtaspelietisi ifaerqrtc. DC. prodr. 1. p. 203. 

Beet II* toDQNJA* tepaJa *» 2 externa major* valde acumi- 
nata vel nulla; getala alba aut ajbida; stamwa numerosa pistillo 
longiora; stigma subsessile magnum capitatum ; capsular 6-lO-loctt* 
lares. — Trutices aut suftrutiees : folia tape ghtfineta. 

f 3. PtdtnotfHi kracttatiM, brm$Hti ocdtteif decuMsati*, itftrwri- 
bmwtoribwnmijbru, axiUarilms tolMariupel termtnaHbut umMlar 
tt$; catyitnu frupatis ; capodis b-lO-locularibui, DC. p. 206. 
• Stigmate magup *emtt» 



C. ladaniferut, foliis planis BUbsessilibus basi connatis llneari-laa- 
ceolatis triuemis supra glabria aitidie subtoa tomantotis rotioulaJfe* 
venoais* espsulia I04oeulanhua. 

CiAus ladanifinu. LiAkenum.2. p.14. DC.projr.l. p.266. 

Cistus ladaniferus. ft. planifrllus. BorU Kew. ed. 2« v. 3. p. 805. 

«. albiflorHi, petalis omnino albis. tedon. 1. C/ta. hi$i. J* p. 78. ic 

0. aunnrfiftif, petalisolbfs, baai maeula atrosaagukie* notatis. Apr** 



Sfcmshrabby* erect, branching: frauds** slender, 
thickly clothed with a : shining glutinous substance. 
Leaves slightly conne cted at the base, nearly sessile, 
flat, linearly-lanceolate, acute, 3-perved from the base; 
tipper side smooth and glossy, viscous; underneath 
clothed with a dense white tomentmn, vettkulately 
veined. Flowers terminal, solitary. Bracks 6, oppo- 
site, crossing each other : the 4 lower ones leaf-like, 
dilated and concave at the base, fringed ; 2 *pper one* 
membranaceous, obovate, taper-pointed, concave, oil)-* 
ate. Calyx of 3 sepals, which are cordately ovate, 
acute, concave, striated, fringed on one side, the other 

B 



side smooth. Petals 5, broadly cuneate; margins 
slightly notched, of a pure white tinged with yellow at 
the base, above which is a large dark crimson mark, 
slightly branched. Stamens about J 00; filaments 
smooth, attached to the base of the anthers, over- 
topping the stigma; pollen yellow. Germen tomen* 
tose, ' cream-coloured. Stigma sessile, capitate. 

This beautiful species must not be confused with 
the plant generally known by the name of Gum 
Cistu8 in the gardens, and also confounded with this 
in Curtis's Botanical Magazine, t. 112; the plant 
there figured is C. Cyprius of M. Decandolle's Pro- 
dromus, and differs from the present in bearing 3 or 
more flowers on each peduncle ; the leaves are also 
petiolate, and the capsules only 5-locuIar ; differences 
which readily distinguish it from our plant, which we 
believe is the largest flowered species of the genus. 
It is not so hardy as C. Cyprius, and will not survive 
our winters in the open air, except very mild ones, 
but will thrive well against a wall, so as to be covered 
with mats in severe weather, and a little dry litter put 
on the ground to keep the frost from the roots ; it is 
also a good plan to Veep some plants in pots, to be 
preserved through the winter in frames, and to be 
turned out of them in the open ground in spring ; they 
will then thrive well, and flower in fine perfection. It 
succeeds well in a rich light soil, and prefers a dryish 
situation, as its roots are apt to rot if it happens to get 
too much moisture. It may be increased by cuttings 
or layers ; the former must be taken off as soon as 
the young shoot is ripened, and they must be pbnted 
thinly under hand-glasses, for if planted top thick, 
they will be liable to damp. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. ColviU, King's Road, Chelsea. We also re- 
ceived specimens of it from Malcolm and Gray's 
Nursery, Kensingtou. 



35 




TSmvtM 



250 



30 

CISTUS cyprius. 
Common Gum Cistus, or Rock-Rose. 



Sect II. Lbdonia. Supra fol 1. 

§ 2. Pedanculis bracteatu, bracteu caducis a^cutsalu,inferu>rilm* 
nrinoribus unifloru, axillaribui $olitarii$ vel terminalibui umbeUatu ; 
calycibusS-gepaHs; capsulis b-10-locularibus. 

• Stigmate magna stssili. 



C. cyprius, foliis petioUlis oblongo-lanceolatis supra glabris subtfts 
tomentoso-incanis, pedunoulis f ubumbellatia plurifloris, oaljcibns 
3-raro 4-5-sepalis, petalis guttatis, capaulia 6-locularibns. 

Cistns cypriaa. Lam. diet. 2. p. 16. DC.prodr. 1. p. 206. Sic*, hart, 
brii. p. 34. a. 25. 

Cistns ladaniferns. Botan. magaz. 1 12. nee aliorum. 



A large bushy shrub. Stem erect, much branched : 
branches spreading, glossy, viscous. Leaves opposite, 
petiolate, connected at the base, and sheathing the stem, 
oblongly lanceolate, acute, more or less undulate, up- 
per side smooth and glossy, viscous; underneath 3-nerved 
from the base, reticulately veined, and clothed with a 
dense white tomentum. Flowers terminal, in a many 
flowered umbel. Peduncles bracteate. Bractes decus- 
sate, deciduous; the bottom ones smallest, and soon 
dropping, lanceolate, taper-pointed and keeled: upper 
ones ovate, concave, taper-pointed, keeled, the margins 
densely fringed with white hairs. Pedicles fasciculately 
hairy, viscous. Calyx of 3 sepals, or very rarely of 4 or 
5 sepals: sepals broadly ovate, acute, concave, the mar- 
gins scariose or membranaceous, inside punctate, and 
striped with numerous lines, outside scaly, or clothed 
with fascicles of very short hairs, having the appearance 
of scales. Petals 5, broadly cuneate or obcordate, more 
or less crumpled, imbricate, margins uneven or crenu- 
late, white, with a yellow spot at the base, and a large 



bright purple spot above it, which is more or less 
branched. Stamens short, about 150, unequal in length, 
the inner ones longest: Jilament$ slepder, pale yellow. 
Germen tomentose. Style hid by the stigma. Stigma 
very large, capitate, papillose. 

The present plant being one of the handsomest, and 
also being pretty hardy, is more generally cultivated 
than any other species; and in all the collections where 
ws have seen it, it has been considered as the C. lada- 
mferuSj and that species in the Nurseries is sold under 
the name of C. salicifolius. In Curtis's Botanical Ma- 
gazine, the present plant is also named C. ladaniferus, 
and the figure is referred to as such in the last edition 
of the Hortus Kewensis, though no two species can be 
more distinct, the present bearing several flowers in a 
cyme, the buds not half the size of C. ladaniferus, the 
capsule only 5-celled, and of a very different shape, and 
the leaves petioled : C. ladaniferus always produces its 
flowers solitary, which are also larger, its capsule is 
from 7 to 10-celled, and its leaves are flat and sessile; 
it is much more distinct from the present plant, than 
the present is from C. laurifoUus, of which it is con- 
sidered as a variety by Persoon: the present plant 
thrives well in the open border, and ripens plenty of 
seeds ; but it is best to have some youngplants also in 
pots, to be preserved in frames in severe Winters, which 
will occasionally destroy the old ones. Young cuttings, 

Elanted under hand-glasses in Autumn, will strike root; 
ut the best way is to raise them from layers or seed. 
Drawn at Mr. Colvill's Nursery, in July. 



3J/ 



& 







34 



v 



62 

CISTUS laurifolius. 
Laurel-leaved Rock-Rose. 



-Sect II. Lbdonia. Supra fol 1. 

§. 2. Pednnculis bracteatis, brocteis caducii decus$ati$ t inferwribus 
minoribus unijlaris, axUlaribus tolitarii$ vel termtnalibus umbellatis; 
^ahfcibmi Z-upslu; capmtU b-\0-tecularibu*. 



C. laurifolitu, foliis pctiolatis orato-lanceolatis trinerviis supra gift- 

bris subtiis tomentosis, petiolis baai dilatatis connatis, capsnlis 

5-locularibus. DC. prodr. 1. p. 206. 
Ciitns lanrifoliua. Linn. $pec. 736. Willden. $p. pi 2. p. 1182. Lam. 

enc. 2. p. 16. Pen. ay* 2. p. 74. iiW. .ffete. erf. 2. p. 304.— C/ii*. 

Aif*.l.j».78./.l. 



S/m shrubby, erect, much branched : branches spread- 
ing, densely clothed with fascicles of short hairs, which 
press inward to the stem, upper part glutinous. Leaves 
opposite, petioled, ovate or ovately lanceolate, acute, 
very much undulate at the margins, three-nerved from 
the base, upper side smooth, of a dark green, and vis- 
cous ; underneath clothed with a short dense white to- 
mentum, which wears off by age, and the leaf is then 
very much reticulated underneath. Petioles deeply 
channelled on the upper side, and convex or keeled on 
the lower, widened at the base, where they are con- 
nected, and clasp the stem, thickly clothed with tufts 
of short hairs. Peduncles long, cylindrical, clammy, 
many-flowered, either panicled, corymbose, whorled or 
umbellate. Bractes ovate, acuminate, convex, downy, 
more or less of a red colour, but deciduous, and felling 
off before the expansion of the flowers. Pedicles cylin- 
drical, densely clothed with fascicles of unequal hairs, 
the points of which bend inwards. Calyx of 3 sepals, 
which are ovate, taper-pointed, convex, or concave 



inwards, with one margin membranaceous, the other 
fringed, thickly clothed with longish spreading white 
hairs. Petals 5, more or less imbricate, cuneate, more 
or less crumpled, white with a light yellow spot at the 
base. Stamens about 180, the filaments unequal in 
length, smooth, light yellow: pollen golden yellow. 
Germen villous. Style short, pubescent. Stigma capi- 
tate, 5-lobed, papillose. 

A hardy strong .growing handsome Shrub, which 
makes a fine appearance with its large green Laurel- 
like leaves, and produces an abundance of flowers ; 
those even in the bud state are very ornamental, when 
covered with their large light red bractes, having the 
appearance of Rose buds. It thrives well in the com- 
mon garden soil, and needs no protection, being quite 
hardy, and may be raised in abundance by seeds, which 
ripen plentifully ; it may also be raised from .layers ; 
or young cuttings, planted under band-glasses in Au- 
tumn, will strike root. 

Our drawing was made last Summer at the Nursery 
of Mr. Mackay, then of the King's Road, but now 
removed with his whole collection to the more healthy 
and pleasant situation at Clapton, where he cultivates, 
with great success, the choicest selection of -New Hol- 
land plants ever introduced to this country. 



J 



JO 




i/U ly J (/uigirty ' ?(/ Z'Uv***Adf ■ ^ 



3$ 



5 



HELIANTHEMUM umbellatum. 
Umbel-flowered Sun-Rose. 



Sect. I. Halimium. Supra, foi. 4. 

* Stylo bred recto. DC. prodr. 1. p. 267. 



H. umbellatum, caole fraticoso ramoso ; ramis junioribua tomen- 
toso-pilosis viacoais, foliia seasilibua lineari-oblongis margine 
revolutia subviacosis : supra nitidis atroviridibus ; subtus tomen- 
tosis, braoteia ovatis acutia oarinatis, pedunculis anifloris race- 
moso-verticillatia terminalibas umbellatis, caljcibus trisepalis vil- 
losia viacosia. 

Helianthenium umbellatum. DC. prodr. 1. p. 267. Mill. diet. n. 5. 
Per*, syn. 2. p. 76. Sprang, syst. veg. 2. p. 586. Swt. kort. tub. 
(ond. p. 123. Hort. briu p. 34. n. 2. 

Cistus umbellatus. Willden. §p. pi. 2. p. 1190. Hort. Kew. ed. 2* 
v.3. p. 307. 



Stem shrubby, erect, or more or less spreading, from 
9 to 18 inches in height, clothed with a hard brown 
glossy bark, much branched : branches, while young, 
viscous, clothed with short woolly hairs. Leaves op- 
posite, crossing each other, sessile, linearly oblong, 
bluntish, with revolute margins, more or less ciliate, 
when young, pubescent and viscous : upper side of a 
dark glossy green ; underneath reticulately veined, and 
clothed with a dense rusty white tomentum. Flowers 
white, numerous, terminating the branches in a whorled 
raceme, and ending in an umbel. Bractes ovate, 
acute, concave, keeled at the back, membranaceous, 
dropping off when the flowers expand. Pedicles in 
whorls round the stem, slender, one-flowered, viscous 
and pubescent. Sepals 3, cordately ovate, acute, con- 
cave, villous, about naif the length of the petals. Pe- 
tals 5, of a pure white, with yellow unguis, roundly 
obovate, or obcordate, imbricate at the base, at first 
cup shaped, afterwards flat, and at last reflexed. Sta- 
mens about 16, nearly erect, the outer ones scarcely 

c 



half as long as the inner ones, and more spreading: 
filaments slender, smooth: pollen orange-coloured. 
Germen densely tomentose. Style smooth, about the 
length of the stamens. Stigma capitate, slightly 
3-lobed, tuberculate. 

This handsome and very distinct species, is a native 
of France, Spain, and Portugal, and is said to have 
been cultivated in this country as far back as 1731 ; it 
is a pretty plant for ornamenting rock- work, but is 
liable to be injured in very severe winters, except co- 
vered with mats or a little dry litter in severe frost; 
if there happen to be a sufficiency of snow on the 
ground, that will answer the purpose ; but it is best 
to have some plants of it in pots, that may be pro- 
tected in a frame in severe weather ; those can be turned 
out in the ground in Spring, where they will thrive 
and flower well. 

The present plant is generally Isold in the nurseries 
by the name of Cistus Libanotis, which is a very dif- 
ferent species, and appears to be much more rare than 
this plant, as we have not been able to detect it this 
Summer in any collection that we have examined ; this 
species varies considerably in habit and pubescence, 
according to the situation in which it is grown; if 
grown under glass, it is much more pubescent, and 
the leaves are strongly fringed, as in our figure ; but 
when grown in the open air, the leaves are quite smooth 
and glossy, with scarcely a vestige of pubescence, ex- 
cept on the under side, where they are clothed with a 
dense tomentum ; we, therefore, believe the two varie- 
ties of M. Decandolle to be occasioned only by differ- 
ence of situation ; we have accordingly united them. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant lent us from 
the Nrfrsery of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, in June 
last; it thrives well in small pots, in a mixture of 
sandy loam and peat, and continues to bloom in suc- 
cession from June to August. Young cuttings, planted 
under hand-glasses, strike root readily ; it may also be 
raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully. 



36 




. 



. 



3£ 



13 

HELIANTHEMUM ocymoides. 

Basil-tike Sun- Rose. 



Sect. I. Halimium. Supra, fol. 4. 
• Stylo bred recto. 



H. ocymmde** caule suffrattcoso ramoao, ramis ereotit incanis, 
folds caulinia obovatis vel ovato-oblongis trinerviit subseaailibua 
▼iridlb^ ; ,*am«lonim petiolatia dorao carinatia apice reflexia 
tttrfrxrae incanis, pednnculis longis ramoso-paniculatis, pedicellia 
oppoaitn ataroiaque aubunibeUatla, calycibua trisepalis glabria 
▼aid* acuminatis, petalis obcordajis baai distinctia. 

HeHantbemum ocymoides, DC. prodr. 1. p. 267. Pen. tyn. 2. p. 76. 
Swi. tort. Mi. p. 34. «• 3. Spreng. syst. veg. «. p. 686. 

Ciatsa ooymoidta. Lam. diet. 2. p. 18. Cistoa aampaucifolios. 
Carat, ie. 1. p. 66. t. 90. nou Milleri.—Clus. hut. 1. p. 72. ic. 



Stem suffruticose, erect, much branched : branches 
erect, densely clothed with a white tomentum, and a 
few long white hairs intermixed. Leaves opposite: 
on die lower part of the stem green, obovate, ovately 
oblong, or oblongly lanceolate, sessile or nearly so, 
attenuated at the base, slightly 3-nerved, acute or 
sometimes bluntish, rather concave, nearly straight, 
the upper side covered with long spreading hairs: 
upper leaves petiolate, shorter and broader, with re* 
curved points, keeled at the back, the margins curved 
inwards ; very white and hoary on both sides, by being 
densely clothed with a close white tomentum. Petioles 
short, also densely clothed with a close pressed white to- 
mentum. Flowers on a long branched panicle. Pedun- 
cles of a brownish purple, glossy, more or less clothed 
with long spreading white hairs. Bractes sessile, 
opposite, ovately lanceolate, acute, keeled, points a little 
recurved, smooth and glossy. Pedicles 3 or more flow- 
ered, in a kind of umbel, opposite on the lower part of 
the panicle, on the upper part alternate. Calyx smooth 



and glossy, with a long taper point, green, tinged with 
purple: sepals 3, oblongly lanceolate, concave, the 
margins scariose and membranaceous. Petals 5, ob- 
cordate, distinct to the base, a little cupped, margins 
slightly crenulate, of a golden yellow, with a large 
black spot a little above the base, edged with purple. 
Stamens between 40 and 50, overtopping the stigma : 
filaments very unequal in length, smooth and very 
slender, bright yellow: anthers dark purple: pollen 
bright yellow. Germen clothed with silky hairs. Style 
very short, erect. Stigma capitate, 3-lobed, papillose, 
flesh-coloured. 

This very handsome species, of which there is a good 
figure in Cavanille's Icones, is very often confused in 
the collections with H. algarvense, as is several other 
species that are belonging to the same section ; we have 
had them all sent to us as H. algarvense y though dif- 
ferent in every respect from that species, except in co- 
lour. The present plant is a native of the South of 
Europe, so that it requires the protection of a frame 
in Winter, or to be planted against a south wall, and 
to be covered with mats in severe frosty weather ; or if 
planted in rock- work, it should be placed on the south 
side, and should be covered with a mat or by some 
other means in sharp frosty weather, but in mild wea- 
ther, the more it is exposed the better : it succeeds well 
in a light sandy soil, or if grown in pots, an equal 
mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit it very well. 
Cuttings taken off at a joint in the young wood, and 
planted under a hand-glass, the latter end of Summer, 
or in Autumn, will soon strike root, and will be nice 
bushy flowering plants by Spring. Our drawing was 
made from a plant at the Nursery of Mr. Cplvill, in 
July, 1823; the plant from which it was taken was 
rather drawn up in a greenhouse ; it generally grows 
more compact. 



3/ 



X. 




2/ 



96 



HELIANTHEMUM microphyllum. 

SmalUlcaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. I. Halimium. Suprafol.4. 
** Stylo mbnuUo, $tigmate magno. 



H. microphyUum, caule suffruticoso ramosissimo : ramis nigro-cine- 
raseentibus apice tomentoso-hirsutis, foliis subsessilibuss&peobtusis 
carinatb basi attenuatis obscure cinerascentibus tomentosis, flori- 
bus terminalibus pamculatis,pamculis elengatis aphyllis, pedunculis 
tomentoso-hirsutis, pedicellis 1-2-floris brevissimis, calycibus 3- 
sepalis hirsutissimis, petalis cuneatis distinctis. 

Helianthemum rugosum. microyhyllum. DC prodr. 1. p. 268. 
Helianthemum alyssoides. p microphyUum. DC.flor.fr. suppl. p. 62. 



Stem suffruticose, elongated, but scarcely 6trong enough 
to support its own weight without assistance, very much 
branched: branches weak, slender, ascending, thickly 
clothed with small shoots, which are opposite and cross 
each other, densely clothed with a close pressed dark 
canescent tomentum, the upper part irregularly, with 
longish spreading hairs. Leaves numerous, nearly sessile, 
crowded, small, oblongly ovate, nearly round, or some- 
times lanceolate, bluntish or scarcely acute, very narrow 
towards the base, undulate, the sides curved inwards, 
sharply keeled underneath, very stiff and rigid, densely 
clothed with a close-pressed dark canescent tomentum, 
margins rough. Panicle terminal, leafless, very long and 
loose, thickly clothed with stiffish spreading purple hairs, 
that are unequal in length, lower branches of the pani- 
cle opposite, the upper ones alternate. Pedicles very short, 
tomentosely-hairy, one to three-flowered . Calyx of 3 se- 
pals, that are ovately lanceolate, concave, very taper- 
pointed, densely clothed with woolly hairs, of unequal 



V 



\y 



not at all imbri- 

Jttd**«%£**^ dark purple spot on 
ct&Jihe b^^id* *£T Stamens from 80 to 100: 
?^^>jffi^& pale yellow: 
*ch * l Loii'.f^pa¥ e 8 P ot atthe P° lnt: /"^ 
JJf^^SJ^ %&hid by the large capi- 

^rff ^^^jii/iir ^'y^/g handsome species, was made from 
1 '^/yard***^ °the garden belonging to the Apothe- 
2 p&J 'v^ at Chelsea, the only collection in which 
* rie**G°t£Fj£ ^xid where it was grown in a pot, and 
c * e h* v **ffarough the Winter in the Greenhouse; it is 
pre 60 */^ latest flowering species, and is nearly related 
at** fasfohkx and H. tugosum^ but in our opinion is 
to ^y^tly distinct from both, being readily distinguish- 
fl l^rotn a " * ts con » eiiCT8 > except H. ocymoides, by its 
ill leaves, and from that by their different form, and 
tie habit of the plant : like the other plants of the sec 
tioii to which it belongs, it is rather tender, requiring a 
little protection in severe frosty weather, either to be 
planted near a wall or fence, and to be covered with a 
mat, or to be grown in pots, and to be protected under 
a frame, or in the Greenhouse ; a mixture of light sandy 
loam and peat is the best soil for it; and young cut- 
tings, planted under hand-glasses in Autumn, soon 
strike root. 



/ 



3f 




Sffarcjtds. 



Pii2>tyTJUdtfw«j.Ta>t2&l7. 



mddais* 



^.. 



40 

HELIANTHEMUM algarvense. 

Algarvian Sun-Rose. 



Sect. I. Hammium. Suprafol.4. 
•• Stylo gubnulfo, stigmate magna. 



H. algarven$e, caule frnticoso ramoso: ramis flexuosis dense to- 
mentosis, foliis sessilibus ovato-laoceolatis obtnsis obsolete triner- 
viis basi attenuatis : supra pilosis viridibus ; subtus tomentosis 
canescentibus, pedunculis subpanicolatis pilosis, calycibns 3-se- 
palis acntis hirsutis. 

Helianthemum algarvense. DC. prodr. 1. p. 286. *. 7. Spreag. ggtL 
veg. 2. p. 6tt7. ft. 9. Swt. hort. tub. loud. p. 123. Hart. brit. p. 34. 
n. 7. 

Cistas algarrensis. Botan. magaz. 627. Hort. Kew. ed. 2. v. 3. p. 304. 



Stem shrubby, much branched, growing to the height 
of 2 or 3 feet if supported, erect or flexuose, seldom 
growing in the manner represented in the Botanical 
Magazine; Branches more tor less flexuose, densely 
clothed with a close pressed white tomentum, and a few 
spreading white hairs intermixed. Leaves opposite, ses- 
sile, very much attenuated towards the base, 'with blunt 
points, greenish and hairy on the upper side, and 
clothed with a thin tomentum underneath : lower tones 
fthort, roundly ovate, and green on both sides : upper 
ones ovately lanceolate or spathul&te, slightly 3-nerved, 
clothed with a thin white tomentum on the lower side, 
and with little fascicles of hairs at the margins, which 
gives them an appearance of being crenulate: young 
leaves white on both sides. Flowering branches a little 
panicled, leafy at the base, clothed with spreading slen- 
der hairs, but not woolly as on the other branches. Pe- 
duncles and pedicles slender and hairy. Calyx of only 
3 sepals, which are nearly equal, lanceolate, taper point- 
ed, and clothed with long spreading loose white hairs. 
Petals 6, spreading, nearly or sometimes quite distinct 



to the base, but when first opened, imbricate: obovate 
or broadly cuneate, with crenated points, of a bright 
yellow, with a large velvet spot at the base, which is 
also toothed in appearance ; the spot at the base of each 
petal gives the appearance of a dark circle at the base 
of the flower. Stamens about 50, either more or less: 
filaments very unequal in length, of a dark purple, yel- 
low at the base, smooth. Germen woolly. Style very 
short, hid by the large capitate, slightly lobed, pustu- 
lose Stigma. 

The present plant being so much like some others, 
with which it is confused in many of the Nurseries, that 
we were afraid it had disappeared altogether, until we 
saw a plant of it last Spring in full bloom at Mr. Mac- 
kay's Nursery at Clapton, from which our drawing was 
taken; we have since seen it also at Mr. Lee's Nursery 
at Hammersmith. It is nearly related to H. ocymoides, 
but that is readily distinguished by its long taper-point- 
ed glossy sepals, from H. rugosum; it is also distin- 
guished by that having its petals imbricate, and its se- 
pals clothed with stiff reddish brown bristles, not soft 
woolly hairs like the present 

This being a native of the South of Europe, it re- 
quires some protection in Winter ; if planted in rock- 
work, or against a wall, it will require to be protected 
by a mat, or some covering in sharp frosty weather; or 
if grown in pots, it may be kept m frames or in the 
Greenhouse, where its lively blossoms in Spring make 
a pretty appearance ; a light sandy soil suits it best, or 
a mixture of light turfy loam and peat will suit it very 
well. Cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, root freely, 
any time from July to September. 




y&«*.dti. % y 7%, y .^ c t. t?u. 



*J 



25 

HELUNTHEMUM candidiim. 
White4tot#d S**~Nose. 



Sect. T. HalimiuH. Supra, fot 4^ 



IL caadfchai, onto firaAiaoso eraoto ; raaia kpfpas-osadidii* faltta 
atnaqne Isproso-caadidu laaceolata-ohpvatia basi attenoati* aab> 
pettokiia planii supra pQosii subtas papilloso-scabris subtrf- 
nervtis ; fforafibua oppositU sessilita* utrfnqucf rfridibii*, p*fan~ 
edit loagis Mfeuriodadia ri»bri# r«l mow piteii*, cfcltcrki* a4* 
■ » fttoaotfiloiis, pttafe vaWe kabriostb. 



8t*m ahfnbhy, etect, much branched, dotted with a 
brawn waited bark : bramehn erect, or slightly spread* 
ing, densely clothed with a close pressed white tooen* 
tarn, and a few long spreading haiw intermixed. 
Leaves apposite, laaceolaie, or lanceolately obovate, 
htattiah, or scarcely acute, flat, or the margin* of the 
round leaves folded inward, attenuated at the base into 
a sort e£ footstalk,, clothed on both aided with a dense 
white tomenium* and long spreading white hairs oaths 
appe* ade; underneath shghtly &*aervedp and very 
rough, occasioned by small tubercles, on which grow 
short tufts e£ hairs ; those on the flower steals,, opposite, 
green onbothsidta, mora strongly ^nerved, with a few 
long spreading hairs on the upper side, and tafta of 
short haira seated en little rough tubercles underneath* 
Flotaar4team*\<mg> paniculateLy blanching; smooth and 
gtaasy*ora few hairs scattered hare and there, JBraeiaa 
eUkrficatiy lanceolate, acate> keeled at the back. P* 
dfeltsgiaHgr, slightly waited. €b%# varying, with 9,4*, 
or £ sepals ; outer small sepals spreading, linear, acarce- 
ly acufcv ttnooth and glossy ; inner anas lanceolately 
ovate, concave, taper-pointed, with membranaceous 
margins, villosely hairy, more or less tinged with 

H 



purple, one or both of the small sepals are sometimes 
wanting. Petals 5, very much imbricate, of a bright 
yellow, with a dark velvetty spot near the base, edged 
with purple. Stamens from 60 to 00, surrounding and 
overtopping the stigma : filaments unequal in length, 
smooth, yellow at the base, and dark purple upwards : 
anthers dark purple : pollen yellow. Germen densely 
clothed with close-pressed silky hairs. Style very short, 
erect, nearly hid by the large capitate, papillose Stigma. 

Our drawing of this very fine plant was taken at the 
Nursery of- Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at 
Fulham, last Summer, where it was cultivated as H.al- 
garvense, which is a very different species, and is now 
become rather scarce in our collections ; and we had al- 
most been inclined to believe it was lost altogether, 
until we saw a fine plant of it in full bloom, at the Nur- 
sery of Mr. Mackay, at Clapton, from which we have 
obtained a figure ; we have met with several other spe- 
cies of this section, which have all been confused in the 
collections where we have seen them, either with H. al- 
garvense, or H. halimifolium. We last year received a 
very handsome and distinct species from Mr. Miller, of 
the Bristol Nursery, which is related to H. cdgaryense; 
it did not arrive in a state fit for drawing, but it is now 
very fine in bloom, and we believe will prove to be 
H. rugosum of Decandolle ; its calyx consists of only 
3 sepals, which are ovate, and thickly clothed with brown 
rigid hairs, which at once distinguishes it from all 
others ; its flowers are not so large as the present plant, 
nor are the petals so much imbricate ; the leaves are also 
of a thinner texture, very much undulate and twisted, 
and very rough or denticulate on the margins. 

We have been informed by M. Lagasca, that the 
present subject is a native of Spain, and he is certain 
that it is a nondescript species ; it will thrive well m a 
warm border by the side of a wall, or may be grown in 
a pot, and protected in a frame in Winter ; it is readily 
increased by cuttings planted under a hand-glass, in 
Autumn. 



-^ 




^ 



05 



HELIANTHEMUM rugosum. 
Rugged-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. I. Halimium. Supra foi 4. 

•• Stylo subnullo, stigmate maguo. 



H. rugosum, ramis subhirtutis tomentoso-leprosis scabris fusco-cine- 
reis, foliis gessilibus in petiolnm attouuatis obovato-oblongis ob- 
tusiusculis subobliquis margine denticulato-scabria undulatis sub- 
tortia utrinque tomentosis rugosis basi trinerviis, peduuculis ter- 

. minalibai axiUaribusque subpaoiculatis 1-2 floris folio brevioribui, 
calycibua trisepalis hispido-hirtutia, petalis crenulatis valdc im- 
bricatis. 

Helianthemum rugosum. Dunal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 268. m. 6. 
. Spreng. *y*t. 2. p. 586. Swt. hort. brit. p. 34. ». 5. 



Stem shrubby, erect or a little flexuose, much bran- 
ched, in our specimen from 3 to 4 feet high : branches 
spreading, elongated, more or less hairy, and clothed 
with a dense leprous tomentum, which by age becomes 
of a brownish grey, and is densely spotted with innu- 
merable minute black specks. Leaves variable, when 
young quite white and hairy on both sides, sessile, 
obovate, or oblong, more or less undulate and twisted, 
a little oblique, three-nerved at the base, very rough and 
uneven, the margins very rough or denticulate ; lower 
ones shortest and broadest, ovate or obovate, bluntly 
rounded, attenuated into a sort of footstalk at the base, 
clothed on both sides with a thin white tomentum : the 
next are narrower and longer, and less blunt, of a 
greener colour, less tomentose, not so narrow at the 
base, more uudulate and twisted; upper ones, when 
young, quite white on both sides, much more hairy, ses- 
sile, and acute : those on the flower-stems quite sessile 
and clasping the stem, much broader, ovate, acute, 



many- veined or lineate underneath, green on both sides, 
rough and hairy but not tomentose, longer than the pe- 
duncles, except when drawn up within doors. Flower- 
stems terminal or axillary, thickly clothed with unequal 
soft spreading weak hairs. Peduncles in a sort of pani- 
cle, terminal or axillary, 1 or 2-flowered, oftentimes in 
a sort of umbel, shorter than the leaf, at their base of a 
brownish purple colour, thickly clothed with soft 
spreading hairs that are purple at the base, the leaves 
at the base of the peduncles are fringed with purple 
hairs. Calyx of 3 sepals, densely clothed with rigid 
purple bristle-like hairs : sepals broadly ovate, acute, 
concave, with membranaceous edges, a little keeled at 
the back. Petals 5, broadly obovate, finely crenulate, 
very much overlapping each other, of a golden yellow, 
each with a large dark spot near the base, which bran- 
ches a little. Stamens from 40 to 45, spreading : fila- 
ments smooth, unequal in length, of a bright yellow, 
with purple points : anthers dark purple before burst- 
ing : pollen orange-coloured. Gennen densely tomen- 
tose. Style very short. Stigma large, capitate, pustu- 
lose. 

For the opportunity of giving a figure of this hand- 
some plant, we are obliged to Mr. J, Miller, of the 
Bristol Nursery, from whom we received it, and it is 
readily distinguished from all others of the section to 
which it belongs, by the stiff bristle-like purple hairs 
on the calyx ; as far as we can judge by the descrip- 
tion, we believe it to be the H. rugosum of Dunal, in 
Decandolle's Prodromus, which is a native of Portugal. 
It succeeds well in a light soil, consisting of an equal 
portion of sandy loam and peat, and if planted by the 
side of a wall in a southern aspect, and covered with a 
mat in severe frost, it will succeed very well, or it may 
be grown in pots, and kept under glass in frames, or 
in the Greenhouse in frosty weather, but should be ex- 
posed to the air as much as possible when the weather 
is mild ; the time of flowering is from June to August 
Cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in August or 
September, strike root readily. 



^/ 



so. 




JM<iri&n 



Jl±% ,. 



*s..*- V/ .7 



4/ 



50 



HE1IANTHEMUM formosum. 
Beautiful Sun-Rose. 



Seot I. Halimium. Supra fol. 4. 

~ "' ')8ubrnUU>, ttigmate wutgno. 



H.formotum, caule frattooao : ranis tomentoao-villosis canesoenti- 
bus, foliis subpetiolatis obovato-lanceolatig tomentoso-villosu : 
junioribus incanis, pedunculia calycibuaque villosia, calycibua 
trisepalia, petalis obcordatis valde imbricatis. 

Helianthemum formosum. Dunal. ined. ex DC. prodr. 1. p. 208* 
Swt. hort. Wit. p. 34. n. 8. 

Cittus formosus. *Cto*. forf. mag. 264. Wiilden. sp. pL 2* p. 1188. 
Peril. <y». 2. p. 75. JSbrt, Kew. ed. 2. v. 8. p. 306. 



i»«» shrubby, erect, much branched : brandies erect 
or spreading, thickly clothed with a close dense white 
tomentum, and long hairs intermixed. Leaves oppo- 
site, crossing each other, very shortly petiolate or 
scarcely sessile, ovate, or obovately lanceolate, obtuse, 
underneath 3-nerved at the base, the nerves more or 
less branched : young onefs densely clothed with a close 
white tomentum on both sides, and spreading villous 
hairs intermixed ; old leaves smoother and greener, the 
hairs on them in stellate fascicles underneath, and 
spreading on the upper side. Petioles very short, vil- 
losely canescent Flowers terminating the branches in 
a paniculate cyme. Bractes leaf-like, concave, becom- 
ing deciduous. Peduncles generally 3-flowered, vil- 
losely tomentose. Pedicles and Calyx densely clothed 
with a white tomentum, and long villous hairs inter- 
mixed ; amongst these are other straight rigid purple 
hairs, which gives a brownish appearance. Calyx of 
3 sepals, which are ovate, concave, tapering to a point* 
with scariose membranaceous margins, tinged with red 
on one side. Petals 5, obcordate, much imbricate, of a 

o 2 



bright yellow, with a large brownish purple spot near 
the base, lightest on the upper part, and slightly bran- 
ched. Stamens about 40, overtopping the stigma, the 
inner ones longest: filaments slender, smooth, yellow ; 
pollen orange-coloured. Qermen downy. Style hid by 
the large Stigma, which is capitate, slightly 3-lobed,, 
and papillose. 

We believe the present to be the largest flowered spe- 
cies of the genus, and makes a handsome upright bushy 
Shrub, but will scarcely endure our Winters in the open 
air without protection ; it makes a pretty plant for the 
Greenhouse, and succeeds well by the side of a wall in i 

a southern aspect, so as to be protected with covering 
in Winter, thriving well in any rich light soil, and pro- 
ducing a great quantity of flowers in succession : plants 
of it may be preserved in pits or frames through the 
Winter, so as to be kept from the frost, they may then 
be turned into the borders in Spring, where they will 
make a fine appearance in Summer : young cuttings, . 

planted under hand-glasses in Autumn, soon strike j 

root ; seeds also ripen in abundance ; so that any quah- I 

tity may be raised ; but as the colour of the flowers ' 

vary considerably on different plants, the seeds should 
always be saved from those of the brightest colours. 

Our drawing was made at the Nursery of Mr. Colvili, 
of the King's Road, Chelsea. 



y/2. 




u. 



M bJXJfKj M*M* 



J2> 



81 



HELIANTHEMUM scabrosum. 
Rough Sun- Rose. 



Sect. I. Halimium. Suprd foL 4. 
+* Stylo subnullo, ttigmate magno. 



H. scabronm, eavle frutiaoso erectrasculo, ramig tomentous villoso- 
pflosb scabm oaneaoentibua, foliia sessilibus basi attenuatis ob- 
longo-orati* acutinsculis soabriasoalis trinerviis undulatis margine 
anbreTolatis : supra viridiosculis subtas tomentoso-cinereis, catyci- 
bus 3-sepalis hirentis, petalis distinctia. 

Helianthemum seabrosum. Per: ty*. 2. p. 76. DC.prsdr* 1. p. 268. 
Sprtmg. syst. 2. p. 687. 

Cistas soabrosna* Hart. Kern* v»2. p. 236, edit. 2. v. 3. p. 308. Ifori . 
JL hi. 2. p. 266. Willden. sp. pi 2. p. 1 192. 



A handsome small bushy shrub, with spreading, ra- 
ther crooked branches, that are densely clothed with 
bunches of short hairs, and long soft villous ones inter- 
mixed : as the hairs wear off, the stem becomes rough, 
the hairs being seated on a sort of small warts or tuber- 
cles, when young white or greyish, afterwards becom- 
ing brown. Leaves opposite, sessile, but attenuated or 
becoming gradually narrower towards the base, where 
they are three-nerved, oblongly ovate, or sometimes 
lanceolate, generally acute, but sometimes obtuse, very 
much undulate at the margins, which are generally re- 
flexed or rolled backwards, hairy on both sides, and 
rough to the touch, particularly on the under side, up- 
per side pale green, underneath very white while young, 
but becoming greener by age. Stipules none. Flowers 
bright yellow, without spots, terminating the branches, 
generally from 2 to 5 in a sort of panicle, which would 
probably be more numerous in a strong plant. Bractes 



lanceolate, acute, very hairy. Pedicles scarcely so long 
as the longest leaves, densely clothed with short rough 
bristle-like hairs, and short down intermixed. Calyx 
of 3 sepals, that are ovate, concave, tapering to a long 
slender point, clothed with numerous short rough brown 
hairs, and short pubescence intermixed. Petals 5, dis- 
tinctly spreading, not at all imbricate, of a bright gold- 
en yellow, very broad at the ends, but slightly retuse, 
and crenulate, tapering very much to the base. Sta- 
mens about 80, spreading : filaments unequal in length, 
bright yellow : pollen golden yellow. Ovarium rough, 
much punctated with small dots, clothed with a short 
pubescence, but glossy. Style short, hid by the large 
stigma. Stigma capitate, peltate, papillose. 

Our drawing of the present species was made last 
Summer from a plant sent to us by Mr. J. Miller, from 
their extensive and -valuable collection at the Bristol 
Nursery; and we have not met with it in any of the col- 
lections about London. It is a native of Portugal, and 
requires the same treatment as H. formosum, to be 
grown in a light sandy soil, and if planted in a shel- 
tered situation, or by the side of a wall in a southern 
aspect, it will stand through the Winter without being 
injured; but should the Winter be very severe, it 
would be requisite to cover it with a mat in the hardest 
frost; or it may be grown in pots, which can be pre- 
served in frames through the Winter, to be only covered 
up in frosty weather. Cuttings of it, planted under hand- 
glasses in August, will strike root readily, but as soon 
as rooted they will require to be hardened by degrees 
to the air, or they will otherwise damp off. 



43 



107. 




JSm*-A>2?*& 



J»»i ly SJbdfWy-T** J*** 



<40 



107 

HELIANTHEMUM eheiranthoide^ 

Stock-like Sun-Rose. 



Sect. I. Halimium. SuprafoH. 
** Stylo mbnulh, ttigmate magma. 



H. ekemmthaide$ 9 caule fruticoeo erecto ramoflo ; ramis jvnioribo* 
villoflo-tomentesis incania, foliis tomentosU cinereo-incanis ob- 
loago-lanceolatM in petiolum attenuatia, pedunculis brevibus sub- 
bifloris, calycibus subvillosia 5-sepalis, sepalu externis minutissi- 
mu. DC. prodr. v. 1. p. 268. 

Helianthemum cheiranthoides. Pert. «y*. 2. p. 76. Spreng.$yst.v.2. 
p. 687. Swt. hort. brit. p. 35. edit. 2. p. 41. 

Cktus cbeiranthoides. Lamarck did. 2. p. 19. 

Cktus halimifolio II. Chu. hut. 1 . p. 71. 



A handsome bushy upright branching shrub : £ra»- 
ohes upright, thickly clothed with woolly hairs, that are 
seated on dark warts or glands. Leaves opposite, or the 
upper ones alternate, oblougly lanceolate, three-nerved, 
attenuated into a sort of petiole at the base, thickly 
clothed on both sides with a close white woolly pubes- 
cence, which gives them a white hoary appearance ; the 
lower ones broadest, and bluntish ; the upper ones nar- 
row and acute. Peduncles generally 2-flowered, densely 
clothed with woolly hairs that are seated on small dark 
warts. Flowers bright yellow, with no spot of red or 
purple. Calyx of 5 sepals; thickly clothed with dense 
wool: the two outer ones very small, spreading: the 
three inner ones broadly ovate, inclining to heart sha- 
ped, terminated in a long taper point. Petals 5, ob- 
cordate, or broadly cuneate, hollow at the ends and 
uneven, imbricated over each other, spreading flat when 
fully expanded, of a plain bright yellow. Stamens nu- 



merous, surrounding the germen : filaments orange-co- 
loured ; pollen golden yellow. Germen conical, downy, 
terminated by a broad, nearly sessile, capitate Stigma. 
The present handsome species is a rare plant in our 
collections ; the only one that we have seen of it was 
sent us by the kindness of Mr. J. Miller, from his Nur- 
sery at Bristol, a collection that is very rich in this hand- 
some family of plants ; another fine strong growing spe- 
cies belonging to this section, H. atripUctfolium, with 
large glaucous leaves resembling Atrvpkx Halimus, has 
we believe quitedisappeared from our collections, though 
we recollect when it was very abundant ; this is also the 
case with Cisius Ledon, which we do not remember hav- 
ing seen for the last ten years, many of those plants being 
lost, through their possessors not knowing what they 
were, and the protection that they require, and also by 
confiising them with others. The present species is 
nearly hardy, requiring only a slight covering in se- 
vere frosty weather, and some young plants of it may 
be grown in pots, to be protected in frames or the 
Greenhouse in Winter ; a light sandy soil suits it best, 
or, if grown in pots, a mixture of turfy loam and peat 
is most proper fo> it ; young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses, in a shady situation, any time through 
the Spring or Summer, will root readily; and the 
sooner they are potted off after they are rooted, the 
better, or the glasses left off them, as they are very 
liable to damp off. 



<*4 




&ir J^.a 



-^ 



w 



HELIANTHEMUM haUmifolium. 

Sea Purslane-leaved Sun-Rose. - 



Seat I. Halikivm. Cmhp 3-sepahn, sepalis ®qualibus, rar6 
6-sepalus, sepalis 2 extends minutis. Pttala rar6 alba, sapissime 
lutea, euneata, tnracata, sepfe basi macula atro-sanguinea r*\ intend 
Intea notata. Stylut rectus brevis rel snbmillus. Stigma capitatam 
snbtrilobajn. &Mina nigrescentia, nrinute annrieata, panea, snbaa- 
gobsa.— Saffrutices xml frnttcet. TohAoppontatrinerviaexstipukUa 
pUosu vet tome*to$a. Pednnonli ]-3- a /fort axiUaret sohtarii vet 
wmbeUati, rarb vaniculatu DC. prodr. 1. p. 267. 

* * Stylo subnullo, stiymate mayno. 



H.kaliwtifothm, canle fruticoso erect* $- ranis leproso-oandidia, 
foMii utrhiqiie leproso-eandidis basi attenuate subpetiolatis ovato- 
laneeolatis aoaftis undnlatia, pednnculb lon^is ramosis subpaai- 
eulatis glabris ant subpilosis, calycibaa senceis 3-4-sepalis raro 
6-sepalis, sepafis externis angostissiniis subolatis. 

Hefiantheoram halimifolhim. DC. prodr* 1. p. 268.? Art, sub. 
lomd. p. 123. 

Ciitu* balimifoKus. Li**. $p p. 624. WiUd. sp. pL 2. p. 1188. 
HarK Kern. td. 2. v. 3. p. 307. Mill. ic. pi. 290. 

HeliaDthemnm elongatum. WWd. emrn. 2. p. 609. Iitafc e»m». 2. 
p. 76. 



Stem 3 to 4 feet in height, shrubby, erect, much 
branched, densely clothed, with a close pressed canes- 
cent pubescence : branches opposite, crossing each 
other. Leaves opposite, oblong, or ovately lanceolate, 
acute, undulate, concave, the margins curved inwards, 
attenuated at the base into a kind of petiole, densely 
clothed on both sides with a close pressed canescent 
pubescence, obsoletely 3-nerved. Peduncles long, 
leafy, paniculately branching, smooth and glossy, with 
a few long slender spreading hairs scattered on them ; 
lower leaves opposite, upper ones alternate. Pedicles 
long and slender, more or less hairy. Calyx of 3, 4, 
or 5 6epals, slightly clothed with a thin silky pubes- 



cence, and sometimes with a few spreading hairs; 
sepals taper-pointed, omter oqes small, subulate, often 
wanting. Petals 5, very broad, obcordate, slightly 
emarginate, jmbrioate, ' of a bright yellow, slightly 
spotted at the base. Stamens numerous. Style 
scarcely any. Stigma large, capitate, slightly lobed. 
Capsule villous, 3-valved. Seeds about 16 ia each 
capsule, angular, light brown, warted. 

Several different species appear to have been con- 
fased with the p res en t, which is certainly the plant do- 
cribed in the Hortus Kewensis, and also the one meant 
by Linnaeus, who refers to Miller's figure, which is a good 
representation of our plant; the spots on the petals are 
larger and darker than in ours, but we have seen them 
vary considerably on different plants. We are not so 
certain of the plant described by M. Decandolle being 
the same, the peduncles and calyx being described as 
white and leprous, which was not the ease with ours, 
ft is without donbt the £L tlongatum of Willdenow's 
Enumeration but it cannot be the H. cheiranthoides of 
Decandolle, who gives the Cistus elongatns of Vabl, 
as a synonym with a mark of donbt. It is a native of 
the SJouth of Europe, and requires protection from 
severe frost, either in a green-house or frame; the 
same kind of treatment as is recommended for Cistus 
ladaniferus and C. candidissimus will suit the present 
plant Cuttings of it, planted under hand-glasses on a 
slight hot-bed, will strike root freely* It may also bo 
raised from seeds, which sometimes ripen. 

Drawn at the Nursery of Mr, Colvill, King's Road, 
Chelsea, last summer. 



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HELIANTHEMUM carolinianum. 

Carolina Sun-Rose. 



Sect. II. Lecheoidks. Supra foL 11. 

** Peduneulis ratnealibus unifiaru ebracteatu. 



H. carolinianum, caulibus herbaceis hirsutis erectis, foliis tomentoso- 
hirsutis subdenticulatis breviter petiolatis obtusis: inferioribus op- 
posite obovaiibus: ceteris alternis oblongo-oyatis, pedunculis soli- 
tariis unifloris hirsuto-oandidis, calycibus hirsutis, sepalis internis 
oblongis acutis. DCprocir. l.p.269. 

Helianthemum carolinianum. Mich.jior. bar. amer. 1. p. 307. Pen. 
synops. 2. p. 77. Purthflor. amer. sept. 2. p. 364. Shot, hart. brit. 
p. 36. *. 17. Spreng.*yst.%p.b88. 

Cistus carolinianus. WaU.fiar* carol. 162. Venten. eels. t. 74. 



Root perennial, somewhat creeping. Sterns several 
from the same root, erect, branching, very hairy, from 
6 inches to a foot in height, the greater part dying back 
in Winter, and fresh ones coming up in Spring: bran- 
ches slender, very hairy, when young clothed with a 
hoary tomentum, more or less tinged with purple. Leaves 
alternate or the lower ones opposite, shortly petiolate, 
hairy, and clothed with a whitish tomentum, and nu- 
merous fascicles of hairs, rough, the margins somewhat 
denticulate, variable in form, but all obtuse : lower ones 
generally opposite, and ovate or obovate; the others al- 
ternate and oblong or ovate, not so much rounded at 
the points. Peduncles thickly clothed with little stellate 
bunches of white hairs, as is also the calyx. Flowers 
large, solitary, terminating the small branches, pale 
yellow. Calyx of 5 long taper-pointed sepals, green, or 
tinged with a purplish brown, very hairy : outer ones 
narrow, linear, but broadest towards the base ; inner 



ones ovate, concave inwards, but terminating in a long 
taper point. Petals 5, obovate or obcordate, narrowing 
towards the base, distinct or but slightly imbricate. 
Stamens about thirty, spreading : filaments bright yellow : 
pollen orange-coloured. Germen smooth, triangular, ter- 
minated by a very short style, that is hid by the large 
capitate stigma. Capsule smooth and glossy, 3-valved, 
several-seeded. 

The present beautiful plant is a native of Carolina, 
and requires to be grown in peat soil ; it should be pre- 
served through the Winter in frames, or in the Green- 
house, or it will be liable to be killed in severe frosty 
weather ; in Winter it dies down to the root, and comes 
up again the following Spring ; this is the case with all 
the North American species, by which means they are 
frequently lost, as the cultivators of them suppose they 
are quite dead, and turn them out of the pots as such : 
it is readily increased by young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses in Spring, the young plants to be potted 
off as soon as sufficiently rooted, that they may be en- 
abled to become strong enough to stand through the 
Winter; it may also be raised from seeds, which ripen 
in abundance. 

Our drawing was made from fine specimens, commu- 
nicated by A. B. Lambert, Esq. 



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21 

HELIANTHEMUM canadeiwe. 
Canada Sun-Rose. 



Sect II* Lechhoidbs. S*fra> foL 11. 

•• Pedmnculis rmwu atUms mmfiarii ebracteatis. 



H. canadense, caul© ereoto apice ramoio : ramii hursntis, fbUis hir- 
aotis inferioribas oppotMs oblongii obtuiit planii : iuperioritat 
alternis oblongo-lanoflolatis aoatis rabtnsiabtomeatote-caiiLimar*- 

S'ne vix rerolutb, peduncnlu hirsatu uniflorts salitariis, lepali* 
ternit oratis aouminatis, petalia oboordatii yalde imbricatif, 
staminibus 20*3S deoambenobiu. 
Httiantheanuneanadeiife. MickJLmer.l. p. 307. Pwnkjl.awter. 
«pt.9.9.p.a03. DC.prodr.l.p.tQO. Per*. /#*.%. p*T7. Spring. 
*ft.«y.2. p. 688? 
Cbtoa canadensis WJfcfc*. ^p.;*/. 2. p. 1190. Bort. Ktw. ed. %. 
r.3. p. 310* 



Perennial, herbaceous. *S/m5 several from the same 
root, erect or ascending, branching on the upper part, 
of a purplish brown colour, clothed with soft woolly 
hairs. Leaves hairy ; lower ones opposite, oblong or 
ovate, obtuse, flat : upper ones alternate, narrower, ob- 
longly lanceolate, acute, underneath thinly clothed with 
a white tojnentum, margins slightly revolute, rough and 
uneven, but scarcely crenulate, fringed with very short 
hairs. Petioles very short, hairy. Peduncles one flow- 
ered, solitary, erect, thickly covered withunequalspread- 
ing hairs, of a brownish purple colour. Calyx of 5 se- 
pals, 2 outer ones very small, subulate, very hairy and 
fringed : inner ones narrowly ovate, taper-pointed, con- 
cave, very hairy and ciliate, the points tipped with red. 
Petals 5, obcordate, scarcely crumpled, margins rather 
uneven, very much imbricate, of a bright yellow colour. 
Stamens from 20 to 22, spreading flat : filaments un- 
equal in length, long and slender, bright yellow : pollen 
dark yellow. Germen smooth and glossy. Style very 



short, straight, nearly hid by the large capitate stigma. 
Stigma 3-lobed, papillosely fimbriate. 

This very pretty herbaceous perennial species is a 
native of North America, and succeeds best in peat 
soil, either to be planted in a bed amongst other Ame- 
rican plants, or to form a patch by itself in a border of 
the flower garden ; it will also succeed very well in rock- 
work, but the soil in which it is planted must be chiefly 
peat, and care must be taken that it is not killed by the 
drought in Summer. Its handsome flowers are produced 
in abundance in July and August; after that time it 
continues to bloom and ripen seeds plentifully until 
October ; but the flowers after August are all without 
petals, the calyx and capsules are also smaller and of a 
different form from those produced by the flowers with 
petals ; this is also the case with H.polygaliefeliwn and 
orasiliense, and we expect with the whole of this section. 

The present plant is sufficiently hardy to endure our 
Winters in the open air without protection ; but as it dies 
down to the ground in Winter, many people might sup- 
pose it was dead, and have it thrown away, particularly 
when grown in pots, as no signs of life appear in it at 
that season ; therefore, if grown in pots, they should have 
the name wrote on labels of some kind, to ensure pre- 
servation. Seeds of it ripen plentifully ; but they must 
be gathered as soon as ripe, as the capsule soon bursts, 
and the seeds are then lost; the best time for sowing 
them is early in Spring ; they should be sown in pots, 
and as soon as up should be pricked out, either sepa- 
rately or several m one pot, or they will be very liable 
to damp off if left top long in the seed-pot. Drawn at 
the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, in July last. % 



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43 

HELIANTHEMUM brasiliense. 

Brazilian Sun-Rose. 



Sect II. Lecheoidb8. Suprafol. 11. 

•* PedmunUU ramealibu* unifioris ebracttatis. 

H. ftroailteftire, catile auffraticoso baai ramoso ; ramis adscendenti- 
bua aubaimplicibaa hirsato-tomentosis, foliis ovato-oblongis acu- 
tis aeaailibas birsatia, peduncnlia calycibiuqae hirsato-canesoen- 
tibua, podnnculia solitariis unifioria ant laxe racemoaia folio bre- 
vioribus, sepalia internia ovatisloDge acaminatis apice subrecurvia, 
petalia obcordatia crenulada. 

HeliaDtbemum braailienae. Peru. «y*. 2. p. 77. DC. prodr. 1 . p. 269. 
Swt. kort. brit. add. p. 468. n. 86\ 

Cistua braailiensia. Lam. did. 2. p. 22. 

Ciatua alternifolina. VahL syvtb. 1. p. 88. 

Stems suffruticose, branched from the base: branches 
slender, at first upright, but at length becoming procum- 
bent, as they catmot support their weight, the points as- 
cending, thickly clothed with loose wool and a few hairs 
intermixed, the older branches a little warted. Leaves al- 
ternate, sessile, oblongly ovate, acute, thickly clothed all 
over with long spreading hairs: upper ones narrowest, 
sometimes lanceolate, of a dull green colour, not glossy 
as in H.polygalafolium. Flowers lateral, solitary, op- 

Sosite to a leaf, or terminating the branch in a loose few 
owered raceme r which is sometimes forked ; the strong 
branches sometimes also produce flowering shoots, or 
racemes in the axils of the upper leaves. Peduncles 
shorter than the leaves, densely covered with white wool. 
Bractes none. Calyx of 5 sepals, the points a little re- 
curved, the 3 inner ones ovate, with long taper points, 
thickly clothed with dense white wool : the 2 outer ones 
shorter t .very narrow, subulately linear. Petals 5, obcor- 
date, notched at the points, at first imbricate, afterwards 
becoming distinct, and widely spreading, of a light yel- 
low, darker at the base. Stamens from 30 to 32, spread- 
ing flat at first, afterwards becoming bent inwards: 
filaments smooth, yellow. Pollen orange-coloured. Oer- 
men smooth and glossy. Style very short. Stigma very 
large, capitate, papillose. 



This species is nearly related to H. pofygakefofam, 
f. 11, butdiffi»suflk:ie*Ul^ 

The stems of this are morp upright and straighter, and 
clothed with loose wool, not with spreading hairs, as in 
that ; the leaves in this are broader, and covered all oyer 
with long spreading hairs, not glossy on the upper side, 
and having the hairs in fascicles on the lower side, as 
in that; the peduncles here are shorter than the leavep, 
in that they are double the length of the leaves; the ca- 
lyx in this is much longer, with long taper poiats, and 
clothed with a close pressed tomentum ; in that it is 
clothed with bristly hairs ; the flowers in this are larger, 
the stamens more numerous; the capsule in this is 
larger and pointed, in that it is nearly globular; the 
seeds in this are also larger, and the yotmg plants, when 
first up from seed, may be distinguished apart immedi- 
ately; they were both sent from the Brazils, by Mr. Fre- 
derick Sello to Dr. Sims, as two distinct species, one 
marked Helianthemum, 19, the other 48. Dr. Sims pre- 
sented the seed to Mr. William Anderson, Curator of 
the Apothecaries' Company's Garden, at Chelsea, where 
they were sown in 1823 ; and from a plant raised from 
it the present drawing was taken last May, the first 
time that it produced perfect flowers; those that were 
produced the preceding Autumn being all apetalous, as 
are the Autumn flowers of all the species of this section 
that we have had an opportunity of seeing; but those 
apetalous flowers produce as perfect seeds as the com- 
plete flowers. 

We have not yet proved whether the Brazilian spe- 
cies of this genus are hardy enough to bear our Winters 
in the open air, but at any rate they may be preserved 
through the Winter in a frame, as we see they are much 
clrawn in a Greenhouse, which proves that it is too wanp 
a temperature for them; they thrive well in pots in a 
mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be raised from 
cuttings, planted under a hand-glass in Autumn, or 
from seeds, which ripen in abundance. 

H. brasihense of Sprengel, must be a very different 
species, judging from his description. 



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11 

HELIANTHEMUM polygakefofium. 
Milktvort-leaved Sum-Rose. 



Soet II. Leohboidbs. Cmfya 6-aopalaa, lopaluexteniislnitari- 
bos angustu, internia acutia margine aoariosia. Pttala lutoa. Styhm 
ivbimlliu Tel broviaaimua ereotaa. Stigma magnum capitatum. 
Ovarium triangnlare. Captula glabra, nitida, trivalvia, unilocalarii. 
Semina rufeacentia, parra.— Canles perennes kerbacei vel tuffimticoH 
ascendent** $eu ereoti, smps dUkotomi. Folia mferisra oppont* ; $mu~ 
tin* afttrna, panmnenia, bnrtter psttobta, $c*$iha, exsttpnlata* PC. 
prodr. 1. p. 209* 

*• Peduncutis ramealihu uniflorii ebracteatis* 



H. pofygatefolium, canle auffruticoao flexnoao»adsceiidente ramoao; 
ramia gracilibna birsuto-tomentosia anboanescentibna, foliia cau- 
Hnia aeaailibna alternis acutia ciliato-birautia nitidis : inferioribus 
oblongolaneeolatia: auperioribaa lanceolalo-linearibiifl, peduncn* 
lis uniflorii foliia tajgioribua caljcibos^oo birauto-cafteaoentihu, 
aepalis internia ovato-knceolatia acwninatfe, petalia oboordatia 
conoavia crenalatia basi imbricatis. 



Perennial. Sterne several from the same root, elon- 
gated, very much branched, suffiruticose, flexuose, 
slender, branching in various directions, ascending: 
branches thickly clothed with a kind of villous tomen- 
tum, and a few hairs intermixed. Leaves on the 
branches, without stipules, alternate, sessile, acute, 
hairy on both sides, fringed, of a dark glossy green 
on the upper side, and paler underneath ; channelled 
on the upper side, the under side covered with tufts of 
starry hairs and longer ones intermixed : lower leaves 
oblongly-lanceolate, upper ones narrower, kmceolately 
linear, acute, concave. Peduncles 1 -flowered, opposite 
to a leaf, and longer than the leaves, clothed with 
numerous fascicles of starry canescent hairs, and a few 
longer ones intermixed. Calym of 5 sepals, the 2 outer 
ones very small, linear, bluntish, setosely hairy, inner 
ones ovately-lanceolate, taper-pointed, the points tipped 
with red ; the inner margin scariose and membrana- 
ceous, thickly clothed with rather decumbent bristly 



hairs. Petals 6, or sometimes 6, broadly obovate or 
obcordate, slightly notched, concave, slightly imbricate 
at the base, of a bright yellow. Stamens about 24, 
unequal in length, spreading : Jilaments smooth, pale 
yellow, overtopping the stigma : pollen orange-coloured. 
Gertnen smooth. Style straight, very short. Stigma 
very large, capitate, papillose. 

Had we not seen H. brasiliense growing by the side 
of the present plant, we should have been inclined to 
have given it for that species, as the description given 
of that by M. Decandolle differs but little from our 
present subject, but it still agrees better with what we 
consider, the true H. brasiliense; plants of both species 
were raised from seed, the year before last, by Mr. An- 
derson, at the Apothecaries 9 Company's garden, at 
Chelsea, where our drawing was made last July ; the 
seeds were given to him by Dr. J. Sims, who received 
them from Mr. Frederick Sello, by whom they were col- 
lected in the Brazils, and Mr. Anderson informs us that 
they are the best things he has yet sent ; the present 
plant differs from H. brasiliense in being much more 
smooth and slender, its branches are more decumbent, 
the leaves less pubescent, of a glossy green, and 
narrower, and the capsules scarcely half the size ; we 
have not seen any perfect flowers of H. brasiliense y 
as it did not bloom tril autumn, and the flowers were 
all apetalous, which was also the case with the autumn 
flowers of the present species, and all the other species 
of this section that we have had an opportunity of ex- 
amining" this season ; the apetalous flowers all produce 
perfect seeds, but we do not understand the reason of 
their producing perfect flowers only in summer. 

This plant, as well as H. brasiliense 7 will require to 
be kept in a cool part of the Greenhouse, or in frames, 
in frosty weather, or they will be liable to be injured, 
though perhaps they will prove quite hardy, as we ob- 
serve they draw up very weak in the Greenhouse ; they 
thrive well in a mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; 
and young cuttings taken off at a joint, and planted 
under hand-glasses, will soon strike root ; plants may 
also be raised from seeds. 



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HELIANTHEMUM glomeratum. 

Cluster-flowered Sun-Rose. 



Sect. II. Lecheoides. Supra foi. 11. 

* Pedunculu multifiarU axillaribus sen terminaliims ijloribus par- 
vulis confertis. 



H. glomeratum, caule sufFruticoso subdichotomo, ramis subtomen- 
toso-cinereis, foliis lanceolato-oblongis basi attenuatis subtus pr»- 
cipue incanis, racemis axillaribus terminalibusve multifloris folio 
minoribus, floribus glomeratis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 269. n. 16. 

Helianthemum glomeratum. Spreng. sy$t. 2. p. 588. n. 23. Swt. 
kort. brit. ed. 2. p. 41. ». 17. 

Cistus glomeratus. Laga&ca gen, et spec. p. 16. 



Stem suffrutescent, erect, much branched : branches 
erect, flexuose, densely clothed with short hairs, and 
whitedown underneath, forked at the points, and branch- 
ing again in all directions. Leaves alternate, sessile, or on 
very short pedicles, deciduous or dropping off in Winter, 
oblong, the lower ones largest and nearly ovate, obtuse, 
the upper ones lanceolate and more acute, all attenu- 
ated towards the base, hoary on both sides, but whitest 
underneath, thickly clothed on both sides with tufts of 
short hairs, that are seated on little tubercles, which 
causes a roughness on the leaf when examined with a 
lens. Petioles very short, furrowed a little on the upper 
side and rounded below, densely pubescent. Flowers 
numerous, crowded in dense clusters in the axils of the 
leaves, and terminal, so as to appear like an interrupted 
spike or raceme; in our plant always apetalous, nearly 
sessile, or on very short footstalks. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
densely clothed with short hairs that are seated on mi- 
nute tubercles, of a hoary appearance : two outer ones 
very small, spreading; the three inner ones ovate, 



acute, concave. Capsule 3-sided, 3-celled, smooth and 
glossy. Seeds few, small, somewhat flattened on one 
side and convex on the other, of a yellowish brown 
colour. 

This curious little plant is a native of Mexico, and 
was raised from seed brought from that country by Mr. 
Bullock, who parted with them to Mr. Tate, of the 
Sloane Street Nursery, and from a plant raised by him, 
the present figure was made : like all the other American 
species that we have yet seen or heard of, it belongs to 
the section Lecheoides of Decandolle : all the species of 
which produce flowers with petals, in the Spring and 
early in Summer, whereas all those that are produced 
in Autumn,wbich are much more numerous, are all ape- 
talous : the present plant has never produced its Spring 
flowers with us, most probably by being killed back a 
good way in Winter, so that it has had to make new 
shoots for flowering, and those have always produced 
their flowers in Autumn for three years following, they 
have all been apetalous like those in our figure, but have 
ripened seeds annually : if the plant was kept in an airy 
part of the Greenhouse in Winter, or in the window of 
a light room, so that its shoots might not be killed back, 
it would most probably bear plenty of perfect flowers in 
Spring, the same as H. polygalafolium, H. brasiliense, H. 
carolinianwn, and the other American species ; it grows 
freely in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand ; 
and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in 
Spring, root readily ; they may also be raised from seeds. 



3~0 



46. 




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46 

HELIANTHEMUM lignosum. 
Hard-wooded Sun-Rose. 



Sect III. Tubbraria. Supra foL 18. 

* Perennia, raro frutioosa ; foliis omnibus exstipulatis, caulibus 
bari pilosis super*} glabris, floribus paucis bracteatis subpauiculalis. 



H. lignosum, caule tetragono fruticoso lignoso : cortice rngoso- 
sqaamosa; ramis adscendentibus piloso-hispidis, foliis orato-ob- 
longis in petiolum desinentibus trinerviis piloso-hispidis soabris 
canescentibus subtus nervosis supra sulcatis : floralibas sessttibus 
glabris oblongo-lanceolatis snperioribns alternis, pedicellis basi 
bracteatis paucis subpaniculatis longitadine calycis, petalis obo- 
vatis distinctis patentibus. 

Hclianthemum lignosum. Swt. hort. brit. add. p. 460. «. 88. 



Stem shrubby, erect, very hard and ligneous, branch- 
ing, clothed with a hard brown rugged scaly bark, 
sometimes cracking longitudinally, obtusely 4-sided, 
here and there knotted where the branches have, died 
away: branches ascending, soon becoming hand and 
woody, and appearing rugged from the persistent bases 
of the decayed leaves, clothed with long bristly hairs. 
Leaves crowded, opposite, oblongly ovate, acute, atte- 
nuated at the base down the petiole, strongly 3-nerved 
underneath, and deeply 3-channelled on the upper 
side, clothed underneath with a dense white tomentum, 
and the nerves with long spreading, white hairs ; upper 
side very rough when rubbed backward, and densely 
covered with canescent decumbent bristly hairs, and 
short down intermixed. Flowering branches ascend- 
ing, densely clothed with long villous hairs on the 
lower part, the upper part smooth, and slightly glau- 
cous : leaves on the lower part opposite, sessile, ovately 
oblong, smooth on the upper side, and hairy under- 
neath : upper ones alternate, sessile, glaucous, smooth, 

n2 



elliptic, concave, acute. Racemes terminal, sometimes 
panicled, few-flowered. Bractes oblongly lanceolate, 
concave, acute, keeled at the back, smooth and glau- 
cous. Pedicles smooth, about the length of the calyx, 
more or less tinged with red, not transparent, and 3 
times the length of the calyx as in H. tuberaria, 
nodding before flowering, erect when in bloom, after- 
wards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, which are smooth 
and glaucous, 2 outer ones very small, subulate ; the 
inner ones broadly ovate, concave, acute, tipped with 
red, their margins scariose and membranaceous. Pe- 
tals 5, obovate, with rounded points, distinct or 
slightly imbricate at the base, much spreading. Sta- 
mens from 40 to 50, spreading, the outer ones shortest : 
filaments smooth and slender, pale yellow: pollen 
orange-coloured. Oermen downy. Style very short, 
hid by the large stigma. Stigma capitate, granular. 

Our drawing of this curious plant was made from 
one at the Garden belonging to the Apothecaries' Com- 
pany at Chelsea, where it was first raised from seeds 
given to Mr. Anderson by Mr. George Don, who in- 
forms us that it was cultivated in his father's garden at 
Forfar, a great many years back, as H. tuberaria, but 
he is not certain from whence he first obtained his 
seeds : it is rather tender, requiring the protection of 
a frame or Greenhouse in Winter, succeeding well in 
a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and is readily in- 
creased by seeds, which ripen plentifully. 



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18 

HEUANTHEMUM Tuberaria, 
Plantain-leaved Sun* Rose. 



Sect III. Tubbbabia. Calyx 6-aepalaa, aepalia extorai* mi- 
noriboa rel majoribua acepe patulia. Petala lutea, asepe basi ma- 
cula atropurpurea notata, Integra vel denticnlata, aerrata. Stamina 
nmnerea* platttlo m«Ho fongiora. Styhu rectus aubnolllM. Stigma 
eapitatnm. Capauia tmalria. Sobim mkwta fla*eftcentia,-~IU- 



djoaa i i wg a Hgnoam sm karbtcem annua. Canto kerbacei erecti 
Men adieemdentti. Folia trinervia opponta exttipulata, superiora 
mterdim altema, taped* stipulata, stiputU lougii litieari acutis. 
Flores itfftpafttcK/att* tui tacemou §ecundi braHeati vet ekroeteati. 
DC. wrodr. 1. p. «a 

* P e rc i Hifl rarg frutic<Mhfofo omnibus ex$tip*latis, cauUbm basi 
piiom anperni glahrii>jloribu$ paucU bracteati* tubpaniculatu. 



H. Tttfararia, perenne, ram o so, caulibua adacendentibna aubsitnpli- 
cibua, foliia radiealibua m petiofam deainentibna ovato-oMongia 
trinerrns tomentoso-hiraQtis caoeacaDtihua anbtua ner?oaia aopra 
anteaftia ; caulinia aeaailibua aabglabria lauoeolatia : aummia alter- 
nia, pediftellia baai bracteatis pancia anbpanicnlatia calyoe triplo 
longioribaa, catycibna glabris nitidis, petalia obovatia diatinctia 
patentiaaimia. 

HelianthemnmTubararia. DC. prodrA.p.VlQ. Pan. *y». B. p. 77. 
MM diet.*. 10. WUU.enum.*. p.bl*. Sprang, fyal.8. p. Ml. 

Ciatas Tuberaria. Lin. tpec 741. damn. icon. 1. p. 65. U 67. Willd. 
sp. pi 8. p. 1197. 



Perennial, herbaceous, branching round in all direc 
tions ; branches short, very hairy at the base : flowering 
ones lengthening out, ascending, quite smooth, of a 
pale glaucous green. Leaves near the root opposite, 
oblongly-ovate, obtuse, attenuated at the base and down 
the petiole, strongly 3-nerved underneath, and furrowed 
with 3 deep channels on the upper side, slightly ca- 
nesoent, clothed underneath witn a short white tomen- 
tum, the nerves very hairy: upper side hairy and 
rough, the hairs decumbent, and the roughness occa- 
sioned by innumerable minute warte that are scattered 
all over the surface. Petioles deeply channelled on the 

f2 



upper side, and keeled on the lower, farrowed on each 
side, thickly clothed with bristly hairs: leaves on the 
flowering stems sessile, smooth and glaucous, more 
acute, concave, lower ones opposite, the upper ones al- 
ternate. Racemes terminal, sometimes panicled. Brae- 
tes lanceolate, acute, concave, keeled at the back, smooth 
and glaucous. Pedicles long and slender, smooth, trans- 
parent at the base, nodding before flowering, erect when 
in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Cafyx of 5 smooth, glau- 
cous sepals, the 2 outer ones very small, subulate: 
inner ones cordately ovate, acute, concave, with sca- 
riose, membranaceous margins. Petal* 5, obovate, 
slightly crenulate, distinct and widely spreading, of a 
bright light yellow, darker near the base. Stamens 
about 50, inner ones overtopping the stigma, outer ones 
much shorter : filaments smooth, light yellow : pollen 
orange-cojoured. Gertnen downy. Style very short, 
.scarcely any. Stigma large, capitate, granular. 

A handsome herbaceous perennial plant, which suc- 
ceeds best in rock- work in sandy soil ; as it is a native 
of the South of Europe, it is rather tender, and should 
be planted in a southern aspect, but it will suffer more 
from too much moisture than from cold, for if planted 
out in the common borders it thrives well all the Sum- 
mer, but will seldom survive the Winter, as its roots 
get rotten with too much wet. 

Plants of it grown in pots, and kept in frames through 
the Winter, may be turned out in the borders in Spring, 
where they will flower profusely, and will ripen their 
seeds ; they succeed well in an equal mixture of turfy 
loam and peat, or any other light sandy soil, and are 
increased freely by seeds, which ripen in abundance. 
Our drawing was taken from a plant that we received 
from the Nursery of Mr. Joseph Knight, last Summer. 
We have a drawing of a very curious nearly related 
species, but quite shrubby, and of a hard woody tex- 
ture, which we received from the collection at the Apo- 
thecaries' Company's Garden at Chelsea. 



32 




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30 

HELIANTHEMUM eriocaulon. 
WooUjf-stalked Sun-Rase. 



Sect III. Tubbraria. Supra, fol. IS. 

•• Annua, foliii tuperioribus uept stipulate, racemis ucundis ter- 
nttuitHtut 



H. srioeaulqn, caule herb^ceo ramoso di-tricbotomo hirsutissimo, 
. faliis oblongo-linearibus angustis hirsutia oppositia : saperioribiis 
atipulatis : extremis alternis, racemit simphcibus ebracteatis, pe- 
' dicellis filiformibns longts pilosis, sepalis externis augastis. Du- 
. nalin DC.prodr. 1. p. 271. 
HelifuitheiDiiiii oripcaulon. Swt. hart. brit. p. 85. ft. 21. 



Annual. Root fibrous. Stems erect, branching, from 
inches to a foot in height; 2 or 3~forked, thickly 
clothed with long spreading white hairs, and short down 
underneath. Leaves oblongly-linear, 3-nerved from the 
base, clothed on both sides with long spreading hairs, 
and with fascicles of short stellate ones underneath, 
rough and punctate, with numerous small dots; lower 
ones opposite, bluntish, without stipules: upper ones 
alternate, acute, with long stipules. Stipules long, linear, 
the margins a little reflexed, very hairy, and fringed. 
Racemes terminal, many-flowered, without bractes, the 
flowers all facing one way, nodding before the flowers 
expand, afterwards becoming erect. Pedicles long and 
slender, nodding before the expansion of the flowers, 
erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed and length- 
ening, clothed with short down and long hairs inter- 
mixed. Calyx of 5 sepals, the 2 outer ones smallest, ob- 
long, obtuse, the margins reflexed, and fringed with long 
white hairs: 3 inner ones ovate, acute, concave, mem- 
branaceous, clothed with long spreading white hairs, 
and short down underneath, warted near the base with 
10 to 12 small black warts. Petals 5, distinctly spread- 

i 2 



ing, more than double the length of the calyx, the mar- 
gins finely serrated, of a pale yellow, with a dark purple 
spot near the base. Stamens from 20 to 25, spreading; 
filaments unequal in length, smooth, pale yellow : pol- 
len yellow. Germen smooth and glossy. Style short, 
erect, hid by the large capitate papillose white Stigma. 
This pretty annual plant is grown in many of the 
collections about London as H. guttatum, which seems 
to be a much scarcer plant; that ours is the true H. 
eriocaulon of Decandolle's Prodromus, we have satis- 
fied ourselves by examining the specimens referred to 
by him in Mr. Lambert's Herbarium, where specimens 
of both species are preserved ; and they are certainly 
very different, although Professor Sprengel has again 
united them, most probably without seeing either. M. 
Lagasca, who saw our drawing, immediately recognised 
it as the H. eriocaulon, before we examined the speci- 
mens: it is a native of Spain and the South of Europe, 
and only requires to be sown in the open ground like 
any. other hardy annual, where it will flower and ripen 
abundance of seeds. Plants of it are now in full bloom 
in our garden, from seeds sown in May last Any per- 
son who wishes to preserve specimens of this plant, 
should gather them in the morning as soon as they open ; 
for if left until the anthers burst, which they very soon 
do, the stigma immediately becomes fertilized, and 
the petals will not then remain on. Our drawing was 
made at Mr. Colvill's Nursery, last Summer. 



J3 



62 




fu.1 fy rjt* dew*? SmnJ0M 



S3 



61 



HELIANTHEMUM punctatum. 
Spot-flowered Sun-Rose. 



Sect. III. Tuberaria. SuprafoL IS. 

** Annua, foliis superioribus $cepd gtipuiatis, racemis secundis ter- 
minalibus. 



H. punctatum, caule herbaceo ramoso diohotomo tomentoiiusculo- 
pubescent* snbcinereo, foliis oblongis penninerriis viridi-cinercis 
breviter pUoso-scabriasoulis ; pilis stellatis minimis : inferior! bus 
oppositis obtusis : superioribns alternis acutiasculis stipalatis, 
racemis longis pabescentibas cinereis, petalis oboratis crenulatis 
distinctis. 

Hclianthemum pnnctatum. Pert. tyn. 2. p. 77. Wiild. enum. 2. p. 670. 
DC.prodr. 1. p. 271. Spreng. sytt. 2. p. 588. Swt. hart, brit.p. 36. 

Cistns punctata*. WiUden. gpecpi. 2. p. 1190. 



Annual. Stem herbaceous, very much branched from 
the base, the centre stem erect: branches spreading, 
canescent, generally forked, spreading, the points ascend- 
ing, thickly clothed with stellate fascicles of short hairs. 
Leaves petiolate, of a greyish .colour, strongly penni- 
nerved underneath, with 5 to 8 prominent nerves, also 
clothed with starry bunches of short hairs : lower ones 
opposite, oblong, bluntly rounded, the upper ones alter- 
nate, narrower, and the points more acute. Petioles 
flattened on the upper side, and slightly keeled on the 
lower, also clothed with little stellate bunches of hairs. 
Stipules unequal in size, lanceolate, acute, clothed with 
the same sort of hairs, and fringed. Racemes terminal, 
leafy or bracteate, erect, iu our plants many-flowered. 
Flowers all leaning to one side. Pedicles slender, erect, 
clothed with a short hoary pubescence, each opposite to 
a leaf or bracte. Calyx of 5 sepals, thickly clothed with 
a short canescent pubescence, the two outer ones small, 
spathulate, narrow at the base, the three inner ones 



ovate, concave, acute, membranaceous, with three or 
four strong nerves. Petals 5, narrow, about the length 
of the sepals, obovate, slightly notched at the points, 
distinctly spreading, of a light yellow, with a small saf- 
fron coloured spot near the base. Stamens 15 to 20, 
spreading, longer than the style. Germen three-sided, 
pubescent. Style short, erect. Stigma large, capitate, 
fimbriate. 

This pretty little species is a native of France, and a 
hardy annual, and only requires to be sown in the open 
borders in April, and to be kept free from weeds ; it 
will then continue to flower all the Summer, and will 
ripen plenty of seed*** . We first received plants of it 
from Mr. W. Anderson, Curator of the Apothecaries' 
Company's Garden, at Chelsea, in 1826, but they had 
been raised from seeds so late in the Summer, that the 
flowers they produced were all apetalous, but those 
produced abundance of seeds, s&me of which we sowed 
m April 1827; the plants from which produced abun- 
dance of perfect flowers, and from one of those the pre- 
sent figure was made. 



^ 




S4 



41 

HELIANTHEMUM ledifolium. 
Ledum-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect V. Brachypetalum. Calyx 5-sepalus, sepalis exterais 
minutis, internis trinerviis acuminatis. Petala lutea, interdum basi 
maculata, parva, aaepe calyce breviora. Stamina pauca 10-20, ova- 
rium cingentia. Stylus rectns et erectus apice incrassatas. Stigma 
simplex. Ovarium triquetrum, angulis ssepfe pilosis. Capsula trique- 
tra, sabnitida. Semina numerosa, minuta, pallida, angulosa. — Her baa 
annua. Folia itipulata, petiolata, penninervia, $ubdenticulata t oppo- 
rita, floralia alterna. Stiputa obtongo-lineares, superiors* longiores. 
Pedunculi unijlori, breves, solitarU, rarb axillares, smpvks ojypositi* 
foM vel oppositibractei, suberecti, horizontals pel retrojracti. DC. 
prodr. 1. p. 271. 

• Pedunculissuberectisfotiis brevioribus, sepalis internis trinerviis. 



H. ledifolium, cavle herbaceo, ramis pubescentibus erectis vel ad- 
scendentibus, foliis oppositis breviter petiolatis oblongo-ellipticis 
subo^nticulatisglabriusculisjunioribus Stella to-pabescentibus ; su- 
perioribus alteruis floribns oppositis, omnibus stipulatis, pedun- 
culis erectis et calycibus acuminatis pubescentibus, capsulis raag- 
nis glabris. 

Helianthemum ledifolium. DC. prodr. I. p. 272. Spreng. syst. v. 2. 
p. 589. ft. 34. Pers. syn. 2. p. 7. Swt. hart. brit. p. 35. n. 20. 

Cistus ledifolius. Linn. spec. 742. Smith Engl. bet. 2414. Comp.fi. 
brit. ed. 4. p. 9£. 



Annual. Stem erect, simple, or scarcely branched, 
smoothish, or sometimes clothed with short loose pu- 
bescence, from 4 inches to a foot in height. Leaves op- 
posite, with short footstalks, the upper ones alternate, 
oblongly elliptic, bluntish, denticulate, old ones smooth- 
ish, glossy; young ones clothed with a short tomentum, 
and fascicles of short starry hairs, nerve underneath pin- 
nately branched : upper side of a bright green, under- 
neath paler, margins clothed with little fascicles of short 
hairs, which are seated on minute tubercles, or small 
teeth. Petioles clothed with little tufts of hairs. Sti- 
pules large, leaf-like, lanceolately linear, taper-pointed, 



also clothed with little tufts of woolly hairs, and more 
than double the length of the footstalks. Peduncles 
erect, shorter than the calyx, thickly clothed wtth a dense 
pubescence, and little tufts of short. hairs intermixed. 
Calyx of 5 sepals, clothed with a short tomentum: the 
two outer sepals small, linear, taper-pointed, and keel- 
ed : three inner ones ovate, taper-pointed, three-nerved, 
remaining persistent, and spreading when in fruit. Pe- 
tals 5, about the length of the calyx, oblongly ovate, dis* 
tinctly spreading, of a pale sulphur colour, with a bright 
orange-coloured spot near the base of each. Stamens 
about 20: filaments light yellow, smooth, unequal in 
length. Germen triquetrous, the angles hairy. Style 
erect, thickening upwards, about the length of the sta- 
mens, terminated by a small slightly 3-lobed Stigma. 
Capsule acutely 3-sided, glossy, the angles clothed with 
short hairs. Seeds small, numerous, pointed at one end, 
angular, pitted, of a dark brown colour. 

The present curious species is an .annual plants and is 
a native of England, as well as other different parts of 
Europe; in this country it is but rarely met* with, and 
chiefly about Brent Down, in Somersetshire, where H. 
polifoliun is also abundant; for seeds of which, we are 
much obliged to Mr. Thomas Clark, jun. of Bridge- 
water, who was so kind as to send us some. 

Our drawing of the present species was taken from 
plants raised in our garden from seeds given us by 
H. B. Ker, Esq. ; it is readily distinguished from all 
others with which we are acquainted, by its very large 
glossy capsule : our plants were raised from seeds sown 
early in Spring, those flowered the end of May and in 
June, and soon ripened their seeds, some of which we 
sowed again as soon as ripe, those flowered in Autumn 
and through the Winter, until the frost destroyed them : 
the seeds only require to be sown in the open ground, 
and to be kept free from weeds. 



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71 



HELIANTHEMUM salicifoKum. 
Willow-leaved annual Sun-Rase. 



Seel. V. Brachypbtalvm. SmprafoL 41. 
•• PeduHcuHi kmzomtalilnufoliu mm brmcteu limgwribus f Jloribm» 
ereeUs; $epatu intemu trinerviis. 



H. xi/ici/oifa*, caul© ramoso, rami* erectis Tel adscendentibiis sob* 
hirsotis, folds breviter petiolatfc oborato-oblongis acutrasculis 
denticulatis subtomentosis supr& virejoentibus, stipulis lineer*- 
oblongis superioribus folio dimidid brevioribus, pedanculis oalyci- 
basque hirsotis suboppositibreoteis, bracteis ovatis acurainatis ses- 
silibus integris. DC. prodr. 1. p. 273. 

Helianthcmum salicifolium. Pen. syn. 2. p. 78* WiUd. emum. 1. 
p. 671. Link enum. 2. p. 75. Spreng. sy$i. 2. p. 689. 

Cistus salicifolius. Linn, spec. 742. iMlden. $p. pi. 2. p. 1260. 
Hort. Kew. ed. 2. v. 3. p. 310. Fhr. grac. t. 



Annual, from a span to 9 inches in height, more or 
less branched ; branches upright or ascending, more or 
less hairy. Leaves on short petioles, obovately oblong, 
bluntish or scarcely acute, clothed with a short down, 
the margins fringed with fascicles of slender white 
hairs, which are seated on little tubercles that gives the 
appearance of small teeth, the upper side pale green; 
underneath paler and strongly nerved : lower ones op- 
posite, broadest, and bluntest ; the upper ones alter- 
nate, narrower, and more acute. Petioles hairy. Sti- 
pules linearly oblong or lanceolate, acute, the upper 
ones broadest and longest, also clothed with stellate 
fascicles of hairs. Flowers small, yellow, in a sort of 
terminal raceme. Pedicles generally opposite to a leaf 
or bracte, horizontal or ascending, densely hairy, thick- 
ening upwards. Bractes sessile, ovate, acuminate, also 
thickly clothed with bunches of hairs seated on minute 



tubercles. Calyx of 5 sepals, thickly clothed with long 
slender white hairs ; the two outer ones small, lanceo- 
late, acute ; 3 inner ones ovate, taper-pointed, strongly 
3-nerved, concave. Petals 5, slightly imbricate at the 
base, yellow. Stamens 12 to 18. Get men three-sided, 
smooth, the angles hairy. Style short, erect, very slen- 
der at the base, and much thickened upwards. Stigma 
headed, fimbriate. Capsule 3-celled, many-seeded. 

This pretty little annual plant is a native of Spain, 
Italy, and other countries in the South of Europe. It 
only requires to be sown in the open borders of the 
Flower Garden, and to be kept free from weeds ; the 
seeds should be sown in March, or the beginning of 
April; the plants will then flower abundantly, and 
ripen plenty of seeds. 

Our drawing was made at the Apothecaries 9 Com- 
pany's Garden, at Chelsea, last Summer. 



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106 

HELIANTHEMUM eUipticum. 

Elliptic-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect VI. Eriocarfum. Calyx ft-sepalns, sepalia extus piloso- 
aericeis sen tomentosiuscnlis intus nitidis, 2 externis minutis lineari- 
bus, 3 internis ovatis 4-5-striatis. Petala calyce pauld longiora. 
Stylus subrectus basi flexus. Ovarium pilosum sea villosum. Cap- 
tufa pilosa. Semina numerosa, rufescentia, minima. — Suffrutices; 
ramt teretes, junioret cinereo-pubescente*. Folia opposita alternaque, 
tubtus cano-cinerea obturiuscula. Stipuhe petiolo breviares lineares. 
Racemi $ecundi parvi opporitifolii, floribus confertis parvulu $cmH- 
but seu majorilmi breviter pediceUatis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 273. 



H. eUipticum, caule sufrrnticoso ramoso erecto cinereo, foliis oppo- 
sitis ellipticis leproao-tomentosis cinereo-candidis obtusis margine 
revolutis, stipulis linearibns parvis, racemis paucifloris, floribus 
sessilibus bracteis subalternia. DC. prodr. v. 1. p. 274. 

Helianthemum eUipticum. Pen. syn. 2. p. 78. Spreng. syst. v. 2. 
p. 689. Swt. hart. brit. ed. 2. p. 42. n. 38. 

Ciatus ellipticus. Derf.fi. ail. 1. p. 418. f. 107. Smith flor. gr*c. 
#.502. 



Stem suffrutescent, producing numerous branches 
from the base, which at first spread out a little, but 
afterwards become erect : branches thickly clothed with 
canescent hairs. Leaves opposite, elliptic, obtuse, the 
upper ones sometimes alternate, densely clothed with 
white woolly hairs, margin slightly revolute, attenuated 
a little towards the base, sessile, or on very short foot- 
stalks. Stipules very small, linear, very hairy, spreading. 
Racemes several-flowered, secund. Flowers sessile, or 
the lower ones on very short footstalks, all facing one 
way, pale yellow or straw-coloured. Peduncles densely 
clothed with woolly hairs. Bractes generally alternate 
with the flowers, deciduous. Pedicles very short, and 
only on the lower flowers. Calyx of 5 sepals, large, in- 



flated, very bairy : two outer sepals very small, spread- 
ing, and clothed with spreading hairs : inner ones 
broadly ovate, three to five-nerved, glossy, the nerves 
pale red, hollow on the inside. Petals 5, imbricate, 
rounded, pale yellow or straw-colour, spreading flat 
when expanded. Stamens from 8 to 10, surrounding the 
Style: filaments yellow: pollen orange-coloured. Ger- 
men hairy. Style a little twisted at the base, then be- 
coming erect. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

This pretty little species is a native of Barbary, 
Egypt, and the Levant, and is therefore rather tender, 
requiring to be kept in frames, or in the Greenhouse, 
in severe frosty weather ; or if planted in rock- work, a 
common garden-pot placed close over it, with the hole 
at the bottom close stopped, will protect it very well ; 
we find this method succeed with many plants that are 
tender, such as the herbaceous plants from Mexico, 
Chili, Peru, The Cape of Good Hope, New South 
Wales, the Levant, and the Canary Islands ; and nu- 
merous rather tender plants that would otherwise be 
killed, are preserved in good health, by that means ; 
the best soil for the present species is a mixture of light 
sandy loam and peat; and some plants of it should be 
grown in pots, and preserved in frames or in the Green- 
house, in Winter, or in the window of a light room ; 
young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in Summer, 
in a shady situation, will root freely; it also produces 
an abundance of seeds, by which young plants may be 
readily raised. 

Our drawing was made from a plant in the Garden 
belonging to the Apothecaries' Company, at Chelsea, 
where it was raised from seeds by Mr. W*. Anderson. 



*7 




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*7 



16 

HELIANTHEMUM Fumana. 
Heath-like Sun-Rose. 



Sect. VII. Fumana. Caiy* ante an the«n apioc tortus 6-sepalus, 
sepalis externis angnstis parvulis, interois 3 ovato-acominatus 
4~5*venosis margine sauriosis. Petata latea parva calyce subduplo 
longiora. Stamina pauca. Stylus rectus staminibus sublongior, 
per anthesin obliquus, post anthesin snberectas. Stigma capita* 
torn, fimbriatam, *ub3-lobum. Captula 3~ra)vis, apcrta patola; 
semma nigrescentia Tel rufesccntia angulosa pauca. — Caules tvjfru- 
ticosi. Folia Unearia sessilia ant subsessilia, angnsta. Pedicelli 
uttiflori, ante anthesin eemui, per anthesin erecti, post anthesin re- 
fiexi. 

* FoUis altemis txstipulatis. 



n.Fwmana, caule suffrutleoso ramoso torruoso snbdifitfso erecti- 
usculo; ramis inferioribus procumbentibos, foliis altemis linear- 
ibus margin* pilosis seabriusculis sabinvolutis : inferioribus brc- 
Tibus confertis; superioribus sparsis longioribus, pedunculis* 
solitariis unifloris rar6 ramealibus saBpius suboppositifoKis termi- 
nalibusve folio longioribus, capsulis apertis mum. DC.presbr* 1« 
p. 274. 
Helianthemum Fumana. Mill. diet. «. 6. Swt. hart. brit. p. 36. n. 36* 
Ciatas Fumana* Linn. spec. 740. Detf.fi. atL 1. p. 414. 1. 105. 



Stem suffruticose, much branched, more or leas twist- 
ed, spreading or nearly erect : tower branches procum- 
bent, or horizontally spreading : upper ones erect or 
ascending, thickly clothed with short downy hairs. 
Leaves alternate, linear, fleshy, bluntish, the margins 
roughish, thinly hairy, slightly curved inwards : lower 
ones very short and crowded ; upper ones much longer 
and more scattered. Stipules and Bractes none. Pe- 
duncle solitary, 1 -flowered, either terminal, or opposite 
to a leaf by the side of the branch, longer than the leaf, 
densely clothed with short woolly hairs, and a few 
longer ones intermixed, erect before flowering and 
when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 



thickly clothed with short hairs, and some longer ones 
intermixed, twisted at the point before expansion ; 
2 outer sepals oblong, obtuse, scarcely half the length 
of the inner ones; inner ones ovate, concave, tapering 
at the point, strongly 4-nerved, the margins scariose 
and membranaceous. Petals 5, roundly ovate, slightly 
imbricate at the base, the points distinct and spread- 
ing, of a bright yellow colour. Stamens about 16 
bearing anthers, besides several sterile ones : filaments 
smooth, pale yellow, the sterile ones rather shortest 
and spreading : pollen bright yellow. Germen smooth 
and glossy. Style a little bent at the base, thickening 
upwards, about the length of the stamens. Stigma 
capitate, slightly 3-lobed, fimbriate. 

This curious little plant is a native of the South of 
Europe, and is a very proper subject for the ornament- 
ing of rock-work, but it should be planted on the south 
side, as it is rather tender, and if the Winter prove 
severe, it will need a little covering ; it also makes a 
pretty appearance when grown in small pots, and it 
can then be protected in a frame in severe weather, but 
it must be exposed to the air as much as possible in 
fine weather, as it is very apt to get damp and mouldy 
if shut up too close. It succeeds well in an equal 
mixture of sandy loam and peat, and is readily raised 
from seeds, which ripen in abundance. 

The present plant is often confused with H. procum- 
bent, but is readily distinguished when both are grow- 
ing together ; plants of that species were shown us by 
Mr. Anderson, of the Chelsea Botanic Garden, but 
they did not flower last Summer. Our drawing was 
taken at the Nursery of Mr. GolviU, in July last. 



Sf 



\ 




^ 



68 



HELIANTHEMUM procumbens. 
Procumbent Sun-Rote. 

Sect. VII. Fumana. Supra fol. 16i — • Foliu aUernis exttipulatu. 



H. procumbens, caule suffruticoso procntnbente ramoso, rami's elon- 
gatis junioribus canescentibua, foiiis alterais linearibus anblaxi* 
margioe ot subtas pilosis : pHis strigosis, peduncnlia subaxiUari- 
bua folio brevioribus, caps alia apertis semina gerentibus. Dunal 
ined. in DC. prodr. 1. p. 275. 

Heliaathemum procarabens. Spreng. sysU 2. p. 590. Swt. hort. briU 
p. 35.— Barrel, ic. t. 445. 

Cistus hurailis sire cham&cistus ericw folio humilior. Magn. bot. 
p. 69. 



Stem sufiruticose, procumbent, clothed with a brown 
glossy bark, much branched; branches elongated, pro- 
cumbent, canescent when young, and thickly clothed 
with short white down. Leaves alternate, linear, loosely 
spreading, rather succulent, scarcely acute, the points 
slightly curved inwards, margins and underside clothed 
with short strigose hairs. Stipules and Bractes none. 
Peduncle short, axillary, solitary, purplish, slightly 
pubescent, erect when in bud, and when the flower is 
expanded, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
twisted at the point before expansion, 2 outer ones 
narrow, linear, acute, more than half the length of the 
inner ones, which are ovate, concave, taper-pointed, 
3 or 4-nerved, the nerves purplish, tubercled, and 
clothed with very short hairs. Petals 5, broadly obo- 
vate, imbricate, of a bright yellow. Stamens about 20 
bearing anthers, besides a few sterile ones : filaments 
smooth, pale yellow. Germen glossy, slightly pubes- 
cent. Style smooth, a little bent at the base, thickening 
upwards. Stigma capitate, fimbriate, slightly 3-lobed. 



This pretty little plant is nearly related to H. Fu- 
mana, but is readily distinguished by its more procum- 
bent habit, more loosely spreading leaves, and parti- 
cularly by its seeds, which remain several days in the 
capsule after it is burst, whereas in H. Fumana they 
spring out immediately as soon as the capsules open, 
so that it is very difficult to procure them, except by 
gathering them before they are quite ripe. 

Our drawing was made from a plant in the fine col- 
lection belonging to the Apothecaries' Company, at 
Chelsea, where it was raised from seed by Mr. W. An- 
derson ; it is a native of the South of France, Italy, 
and Tauria, according to M. Decandolle ; and we find 
it much hardier than H. Fumana, thriving well in a 
light sandy feoil, or a mixture of light turfy loam, peat, 
and satfd, will suit it very well. It makes a pretty 
plant mixed with others, for adorning rock- work, but 
will require a little covering in severe frosty weather ; 
or it may be grown in small pots, and can then be pro- 
tected in frames or in the Greenhouse, in Winter. 
Seeds of it ripen plentifully, by which it might be 
readily increased; or cuttings, planted under hand- 
glasses, will soon strike root. 



Sf 



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A»i */ SJhJfns JUy A 



s? 



97 

HELIANTHEMUM arabicum. 

Arabian Sun-Rose. 



Sect. VII. Fumana. Supra fol. 16. 
*+ Foliis altemis stipulate. 



H. arabicum, caule suffruticoso hirauto adscendente, ramis virgatis, 
foliis alternis lineari-oblongis hirsutis subeessilibus, pedunculis so- 
litariis unifloris suboppositifoliis ramealibus terminalibusve, caly- 
cibiw hirsutis. DC. prodr. ] . p. 275. 

Helianthemum arabicum. Pen. synops. 2. p. 80. *. 80. Sprung, syst. 
2. p. 601. *» 61. 

Cistus arabicus. Linn. spec. 745. Willd. spec. pi. 2. p. 1211. n. 79. 
FoA/. symb. 2. p. 62. r. 35. Sibthorp Flor. graec t. 503. 

Cfotus ferrugineus. Lamarck did. 2. p. 25. 



Suffrutescenty very much branched : branches slender, 
hairy, ascending, growing in a close compact tuft. 
Leaves alternate, linearly oblong, taper-pointed, attenu- 
ated to the base, nearly sessile, hairy. Petioles very short, 
or scarcely any. Stipules ovate, taper-pointed, hairy, and 
fringed. Peduncles solitary, opposite to a leaf, or termi- 
nating the branches, twice the length of the calyx, slen- 
der, and clothed with short hairs. Flowers saffron-co- 
loured, more or less tinged with purple at the back and 
margins. Calyx of 5 sepals, thickly clothed with short 
hairs; the two outer ones smallest, lanceolate, broad- 
est towards the base, taper-pointed, spreading, or the 
points sometimes reflexed : inner ones ovate, acute, con- 
cave inwards, 2 or 3-nerved. Petals 5, broadly obovate, 
terminating iu a sort of point, very much imbricate at 
the margins. Stamens numerous : filaments smooth, yel- 
low, unequal in length. Germen pubescent. Sty& smooth, 
longer than the stamens. Stigma small, capitate, papil- 

2 c 



lose. Capsule large, pubescent, three-celled, and many 
seeded. 

The present handsome and very distinct species is a 
native of Barbary, Arabia, Greece, and the South of 
Europe, and is therefore rather tender, requiring the 
protection of a frame or Greenhouse in Winter ; or if 
grown by the side of a wall, or in rock-work, it will 
need some sort of covering in severe frosty weather ; 
but it is much better to preserve some plants of it in 
pots in the Greenhouse or frames through the Winter, 
keeping them in an airy situation, and exposing them 
as much as possible in mild weather, that they may not 
be drawn up weak ; they can then be turned out in the 
Spring, and be planted in rock- work, or in a warm bor- 
der, where they will produce their lively flowers in suc- 
cession for a considerable time; young cuttings, plant- 
ed under hand-glasses in Spring or Summer, will strike 
root readily. 



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24 



HELIANTHEMUM lampes. 

Cluster-leaved Sun- Hose. 



«tet VIL FfTMAM ▲. Swprm, fat. 16. 
*• Folii* altemis BtipukUi*. 



H. Jetflpes, caul© fruticoao ramoaiaaimo adsoeritaite; ramis graei- 
Kbits pateatttma, folia atipubtia aetaceta gtamota aubghtoia, gfcm- 
sua foliaoeia axittariboa, stipulia filiformiboa longis, pedunculia 
longia racemoaia secnndia, pedicellia glabria baai bractoatis, caly- 
cibna hirsutis, petaKa ofrovatis distinctis. 

HaUMtbamum kevipes. DC. jwWn 1. p. VHk WilkL§mm>WO. 
Pari. ays. 2. p. 76. S»t. Aorl. brit. p. 36. ft. 97. fyra»0« apt. t*p. 2» 
p. 601. 

Cistus lteripea. Xtun. jp. p/. 73d. WiUden. sp. pi. 2. p. 1190. Jacq. 
hffrt. vinxL 2. p. 74. I. 158. Soto*. iMgaz. 1782.— Car. j«H»» 
p*o*. p. 304. ». 6. 1 14. 



Stem shrubby, very much branched, ascending : 
branches very slender, rigid and easily broken. Leaves 
alternate, stipulate, bristle-shaped, nearly cylindrical, 
obtuse, with a short sharp point, succulent, of a very 
blue glaucous colour. Stipules subulate, acute, not half 
the length of the leaves : in the axil of each large leaf is a 
tuft of smaller ones, which belongs to a young shoot, but 
many of which never come to perfection. Peduncles ter- 
minal, racemose, often panicled, villosely hairy, at first 
nodding, but as the flowers expand, considerably 
lengthened and becoming straight. Bractes at the base 
of the pedicles, and alternating with them, obtuse, 
broadish at the base, the lowermost largest and gradually 
decreasing upwards. Pedicles quite smooth, purplish, 
all leaning to one side, nodding before the flowers ex- 
pand, erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx 
of 5 sepals, a little twisted before opening ; 2 outer ones 
roundly oblong, blunt, hairy, and fringed : inner ones 
ovate, scarcely acute, concave, strongly 4-nerved, with 
scariose membranaceous margins, very hairy. Corolla 



of 5 petals, distinct or scarcely imbricate, roundly obo- 
vate or obcordate, slightly concave, more or less ere- 
nulate, of a bright pale yellow. Stamen* numerous, 
about the length of the style, scarcely half of them bear- 
ing anthers : filaments slender, pale yellow, more or 
less twisted, about 20 bearing anthers, sterile ones sur- 
rounding the fertile ones, slender and more twisted, 
haying the appearance of fringe : pollen pale yellow. 
Oermen smooth. Style a little bent at the base, scarcely 
thickening upwards. Stigma small, capitate, slightly 
3-lobed, fimbriate. 

This elegant little plant is a native of the South of 
Europe, and requires the protection of a Greenhouse in 
Winter ; but the more airy the situation is, in which it is 
grown, the better it will thrive, as it is liable to damp 
and lose its leaves if grown in too close a situation, or 
crowded amongst other plants ; its flowers are produced 
from June to August, according to the situation in which 
it is kept; they are of short duration, as the stamens so 
soon come in contact with the stigma, which fertilizes 
the capsule, and the petals are thrown off immediately ; 
but this may be prevented in part, by taking off the an- 
thers before they burst, the petals then remain on much 
longer ; the same rule is applicable to all other flowers, 
many of which may be preserved for days or even weeks 
longer, by divesting them of their anthers, and keeping 
them in a close house where no insects can bring pollen 
to them; we have known this circumstance for years, 
but we do not know that it has ever been published ; we 
first observed it when we were attaching the pollen of 
the different species of Pelargonium to the stigmas, the 
petals were almost immediately thrown off, whereas 
others of the same sorts remained in flower many days, 
in a house that was kept shut up from the insects, and 
where the pollen was not applied to the stigmas. 

The present little plant succeeds well in a mixture 
of sandy loam and peat, and is readily increased by 
seeds, which should be sown early in Spring ; or by 
cuttings, which strike root freely under hand-glasses. 
Drawn at the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, last Summer, 



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102 



HELIANTHEMUM thymifolium. 

Thyme-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. II. Fuman A. Supra fol. 16. 
*** Foliis oppasitis altemUque stipulatis. 



H. thymifolium, caule suffmticoso procumbente, ramis pubescenti- 
bus, foliis sublinearibus brevissiniis pubescentibus oppositis summis 
alternis, stipulis mucronatis erectis, pedunculis villoso-glutinosis 
paucifloris. DC. prodr. 2. p. 276. 

Heliantbemum thymifolium. Per*, syn. 2. p. 79. Spreng. syst. 2. 
p. 591. 

Cistus thymifolius. Linn. spec. 743. Witlden.9p.pL 2. p. 1206. Iforf. 
Jfoc. erf. 2. v. 3. p. 312. Flor. grmc. t. 500. — Barrel, ic. t. 444. 



A pretty little dwarf suffrutescent plant. Stems nu- 
merous, procumbent, the points ascending, densely pu- 
bescent, or clothed with short hairs. Leaves crowded, 
opposite, linearly oblong, scarcely acute, very short, 
thickly clothed with a roughish pubescence ; the young 
shoots produced in the axils of the leaves give the ap- 
pearance of the leaves being tufted : upper leaves some- 
times alternate. Stipules short, erect, mucronate. Ra- 
cemes terminal, few-flowered, nodding before the flowers 
expansion, becoming erect as they expand. Peduncles 
and pedicles villosely hairy, somewhat glutinous. Brac- 
tes snort, very hairy. Pedicles drooping before the flow- 
ers expansion, erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. 
Calyx of 5 sepals, clothed with a short clammy pubes- 
cence; the 2 outer ones very small and narrow, spread- 
ing or somewhat reflexed, inner ones broadly ovate, 
concave, short and inflated, acute. Petals 5, bright 
yellow, obovate, somewhat crumpled, imbricate over 

2d2 



each other near the base. Stamens from 20 to 30 : Jtia- 
mcnts pale yellow. Germen smooth, 3-sided. Style 
straight, smooth, a little longer than the stamens. Stig- 
ma capitate, slightly 3-lobed, fimbriate. 

This neat little species is a native of the South of 
Europe and the Levant; it is an old inhabitant of our 
gardens, in which it is sometimes in great abundance ; 
but is again frequently lost, as it is very apt to rot off 
in Winter with too much moisture, as well as from se- 
vere frost ; it is therefore best to keep some plants of it 
in pots, to be preserved in frames or in the Greenhouse 
in frosty or very wet weather, exposing it as much as 
possible when the weather is dry and mild ; although 
its flowers are not so showy as some other species, its 
very distinct habit and character make it well worth 
the notice of cultivators, particularly as it belongs to a 
tribe of the genus that produces but few species : the 
best soil to grow it in is a sandy peat, mixed with a 
little loam, and the pots to be well drained with pot- 
sherds, that the wet may pass off freely : young cut- 
tings, planted under hand-glasses, in a light sandy soil, 
in Spring or Autumn, will soon strike root ; it may 
also be raised from seeds, which are ripened in abun- 
dance ; plants of it make a pretty appearance in Sum- 
mer when planted out in rock-work, but they will sel- 
dom survive the Winter in such situations, without be- 
ing well attended to, and covered up in severe weather, 
and to be exposed as much as possible when the weather 
is mild. 



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83 



HELIANTHEMUM glutinosum. 

... Clammy Sun-Rose. 



Sect VII. Fumaka. Stprafolie. 
•♦* I^im^pponHsaUerni$que$tip^latu. 



H* g hOmonm, canle snffimttcoao adtcendente, rantfs YUlojo-gluti- 
; joi». ftubcinereu,' foliis sublinearibus margine rerolutis yilloao- 

ghitinosifl subcinereis oppositia; summis alternis, stipulis inferio- 

ribus minutis : ceteris longis laxiusculis, pedupculis calyoibuaque 

vffioso-glutiiiosis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 276. 
HeHabthenram gfatiooBtun. Pcrs.syn.2.p**19. WUU.eaMm.iufp. 

p. 39. Link enum. Lber.Z.p.16. Spreng. syit. % p. 691. SwL 

hart. brit. p. 35. 
Cisttu gltttinosus. Linn. *p. pi. 2. p. 1206. Mant. 246. Willdeu. sp. 

pi. 2. p. 1206. Cava*. ic. 2. p. 36. 1. 145./. 2. Hart. Kew. edft. 2. 

jp.311. 



Stem suflruticose, slender, erect or ascending, clothed 
with a brown bark that scales off, much branched: 
branches slender, erect or ascending, thickly clothed 
with short villous hairs, that are more or less viscous, 
giving a grey or hoary appearance. Leaves opposite on 
the lower part of the stem, the upper ones alternate, 
linear or sometimes lanceolately linear, revolute at the 
margins, thickly clothed with short viscous hairs, of a 
dark green colour, but they appear rather hoary from 
the hairs with which they are covered* upper ones shor- 
ter and blunter. Petioles very short. Stipules on the 
lower leaves small, subulate, fleshy, pubescent : on the 
upper ones longer and larger, spreading, and bluntish, 
villous. Flowers axillary, solitary, terminating the bran- 
ches in a sort of raceme, that is at first a little nodding, 
but as the flowers expand, it becomes upright. Pedicles 
villosely viscous. Calyx of 5 sepals, clothed with short 



i 

\ 



viscous hairs ; the two outer ones very small, oblong, 
bluntish: inner ones ovate, concave, strongly veined, 
scarcely acute. Petals 5, small, a little longer than the 
calyx, obovate, distinctly spreading, pale yellow, some- 
times with an orange or golden crescent shaped spot a 
little above the base. Stamens several .filaments smooth, 
pale yellow. Oermen glossy, 3-sided. Style straight, 
smooth. Stigma capitate, fimbriate, slightly 3-lobed. 

The present very distinct species is a native of Spain, 
and the South of France, and requires a little protection 
in Winter, either to be placed in a frame or the Green- 
house in frosty weather ; its flowers are very fugacious, 
as the petals stay on but a few hours in the morning, 
and are always fallen before the middle of the day, but 
the flowers are produced in succession nearly all the 
Summer and till late in Autumn ; it also ripens abund- 
ance of seeds ; the best soil to grow it in is an equal por- J 
tion of sandy loam and peat ; and if grown in rock- work, j 
it will require a little covering in Winter. Cuttings of I 
it, planted in pots, or under hand-glasses, in July or [ 
August, will soon strike root. 

Our drawing was made from a plant sent us by 
A. B. Lambert, Esq. from his choice collection at 
Boyton House, Wilts, where it was raised from seed 
received from Spain. 



I 

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I 



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85 

HELIANTHEMUM celandicum. 

Pale green-leaved Sun-Rase. 



Sett VIII. Pskudocistus. Supra foL 2. 



H« akmdiemm, caale wffraticoao procumbent* 1910000, foliis lanceo- 
l*to^lliptici^obt«8iufiCuli8utariiiqu^ viridibus 8aep£ glabris interd&m 
ciliatis petiolatis; summis sessilibus, racemis simplicibus paucifloris, 
calycibus subgloboso-ovatis. DC.prodr. 1. p. 276. 

Helianthemumalattdicum. DC.Jhr.fr. 4. p. 817, SwtJkort. ftrit.p.86. 
tt.45. 

Cistus oelandicus. Xittn.jp. 741. 

Cham«cistus2. C%it.Atri.p.73.tc. 



5ife/& sufirutescent, branching, procumbent, or laying 
flat on the ground, the young branches hairy. Leaves 
pale green on both sides, lanceolately elliptic, bluntish, 
others lanceolate and acute, hairy when young, but 
becoming smooth by age, the margins fringed ; lower 
ones petiolate, the upper ones near the flowers sessile. 
Petioles slender, hairy. Stipules none. Racemes termi- 
nal, simple, few-flowered. Bractes small, sessile, hairy 
and fringed, acute. Pedicles slender, very hairy, tinged 
with purple. Calyx of a roundish oval, consisting of 
5 sepals, hairy : 2 outer sepals very small, spreading : 
inner ones ovate, concave inwards, scarcely acute. 
.Petals 5, pale yellow, distinct, spreading, about the 
length of, or scarcely longer than the sepals, obovate, 
rounded at the points. Stamens numerous, unequal in 
length, spreading: filaments yellow: pollen orange-co- 
loured. Germen hairy. Style short, twisted at the base. 
Stigma capitate, slightly 3-lobed, papillose. 

Our drawing of this pretty little species was made 
from a plant in the Apothecaries 9 Company's Garden 

z 



at Chelsea, several plants of it having been raised by 
Mr. W. Anderson, from seeds that he received from 
Germany ; it is nearly related to H. alpestre, but is suf- 
ficiently distinguished by its weaker growth, much 
narrower leaves, and smaller flowers, the petals of 
which are distinct, and not imbricate as in H. alpestre. 
It is a very pretty plant for the ornamenting of rock- 
work, taking up but little room, so that it requires to 
be planted m a conspicuous situation ; it also does 
very well, and makes a pretty appearance, when culti- 
vated in small pots, requiring a light sandy soil; 
young cuttings of it, planted under hand-glasses, strike 
root readily ; it may also be increased by seeds, which 
should be sown the beginning of April, and as soon as 
up, be pricked off in small pots, and as they increase 
in size to be shifted into larger ones, they will then 
make fine plants the first season. 



^ 




*4 



74 



HELIANTHEMUM pulchellum. 
Neat Sun-Rase. 



Sect VIII. Psbudocistus. Supra foLZ. 



H. jmlckelhm t canle snffruticoso procumbent* ramoso: ramis to- 
raentoso-incanis, foliis rotaadatis ovatisye obtusis supra viridibut 
piloso-hispidis acabris : subtus tomentoso-incanis margine parum, 
revolutis, racemis simplicibus, calycibns pilosis canescentibus,- 
petalis inibricatis. 

Heliantbemum alpestre. Spreng. sytf. 2. p. 690. nee aliorum^ 



A small trailing suffruticose plant ; branches short, 
spreading in alt directions, the points ascending, tinged 
with purple, the upper part clothed with a short white 
thin tomentum, which wears off as they become older. 
Leaves nearly round, or the upper ones ovate, the mar- 
gins slightly revolute ; lower ones very small, green, 
and dotted with little rough dots on the upper side, 
and covered with stiffish white hairs, underneath 
clothed with a dense white tomentum. Petioles short 
and flat, fringed with long hairs. Racemes terminal, 
simple, several-flowered, nodding before the flowers ex- 
pansion, afterwards erect. Bractes lanceolate, acute, 
broad at the base, very hairy. Pedicles slender, clothed 
with a short white thin tomentum, and a few longer 
hairs intermixed, nodding before the flowers expand, 
and erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx 
of 5 sepals, clothed with long bristly hairs, which give 
it a white appearance ; 2 outer sepals very small, lance- 
olate, bluntish; inner ones ovate, obtuse, concave, 
strongly nerved. Petals 5, broadly obcordate, imbri- 
cate, slightly crenulate, of a bright pale yellow. Stamens 
from 40 to 50, the filaments and anthers yellow. Ova* 

u2 



rium pubescent. Style short, twisted. Stigma very 
large, capitate, fimbriate. 

From Sprengel's description, we believe the present 
to be the plant he intends for H. alpestre, but certainly 
not the one described by Decandolle, which we have 
already published, and the leaves of which are green on 
both sides ; the present is a stiffer shorter plant, with 
much stiffer and rounder leaves, which are of a snowy 
whiteness on the lower side. It is certainly a very 
pretty plant when covered With its numerous flowers, 
and is a very proper subject for adorning rock-work, 
or for growing in a small pot ; it is quite hardy, as we 
see several nice plants of it thriving well in Mr. Col- 
vilTs Nursery at Koehampton, that had stood two years 
in the open border without any protection. It succeeds 
well in a light sandy soil, or an equal mixture of light 
sandy loam and peat will suit it very well ; young cut- 
tings, planted under hand-glasses, in Autumn, strike 
root readily. 

Our drawing was made last Summer, from a plant 
in the collection of Mr. Colvill, at his Nursery in the 
King's-road, Chelsea. 



Sjr 




&.£ fy ~*&<4«s*# /6j? Jcua<*Jfy J^.//cfJZ£. 



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6r 



HELIANTHEMUM alpestre* 

Alpine Sun-Rose. 



HELIANTHEMUM. Calyx 3-sepahis, sepalis etjttalibiis, Tel 
6-sepalus, sepalis dupliei serie dispoeitit, 2 externis s»pe minoribus, 
rarfr majoribua. Petala 6 s»pe apice irregulariter denticulata. 
Stigma capitatum. Stylus nunc subnullus, nuno rectus, nunc 
obliquus, nunc basi Aexus. Ovarium triquetrum. Capeula 3-valvis, 
▼alvis medio septi ant seminiferis. Semina aagulata, glabra. 
Albumen farinosum. Embryo nncinato-iaflexua (in Bel vulgar* 
Gaurtn. 1. p. 371. 1 70. f. 11.)— Herbse, suffrutices, frutices. Folia 
onpoeita altemmque, exstipmlatu vel sHpulata, trinervia velpenninervia. 
Pedkelli ecpistimh ban bracteati, interdum oppotitibraetei sett 
appositifoHi, nunc ooUtarii, nunc umbellati, nunc raeemoei, racemie 
9ecundis, nunc corymbeoi, nunc pamculati. 

Genua divisum in aeries tres nempfe. 

IK Stylo recto erecto subnullo aat staminibus breriore, stigmate 
capiUto.— Seat. 1-3. Haumium. Lbchboiobs. Tubbraria. 

2«. 8tylo recto erecto staminibus tequali ant longiora. Sect 4-6. 
Macolaria. Brachypetalum. 

9. Stylo baai inflexo. Seel. 6-9. Eriocarpum. Fum ana. 
PSEUDOCISTUS. EUHBtlA^TI^BMDM. DC. prodr. 1. ». 260-267* 

Sect. VIII. PsbudocisTUS. Calyx 6-sepalus, sepalis externia 
angustis minutis, internis 4-veniis. Petal* lutea, parva, calyce vix 
dupl6 longiora. Stylus basi contortus retrpflexus apice inflexus, 
staminibus saBpe brcvior, rard longior. Stigma capitatum, trilobum. 
Capsule* parvw. Semina pauca, subrufescentia.— - Herbas perennes 
out suffrutices. Folia petiolata, penninervia, opposita, exstipulata, 
rarb stipulata in summitate ramorum. Flores secundi, raeemoei sen 
paniculatu Pedicelli ban bracteati, bracteis sessilibus Hnearulun* 
ceolatis, ante anthesin recurvi, per anthesin erecti, poet qnthesin 
reflexi* DC. p. 276. 



H. ajpestre, caule suffruticoso procnmbente ramoso : ramis piloso- 
hirsutis, foliis utrinque subviridibus oblongo-ellipticis snbglabris 
▼el fasciculatim piloso birsntis petiolatis : summis subsessilibus, 
pediceUis calycibusque piloso-birsutis : pilis albido-cinereis, pe- 

• talis imbrioatis calyce dnplo longioribus, staminibus 30-40 patent 
tibns. 

Helianthemnm alpestre. DC. prodr. 1. p. 276. 

Cistns alpestris. Crantz. oust. p. 103. f • 6. /. 1. Wahlemb. keh. 
p. 103. Lodd. bat. cab. 131. 

Cistns oelandicns. Jacq. aust. t. 399. 



Stem shrubby, procumbent, branching in all direc- 
tions: branche$ thickly clothed with white spreading 
unequal hairs. Leaves green on both sides, oblong- 
elliptic, with a strong nerve underneath, and furrowed 
above, more or less hairy on both sides : lower ones 
petiolate ; upper ones sessile, or nearly so, shorter and 
rounder. Petioles flat, fringed. Stipules none. Flowers 
terminal, in short secund racemes, of a bright yellow. 
Bractes at the base of the pedicles, oblong, or lanceo- 
late, bluntish, densely hairy. Pedicles slender, thickly 
clothed with white unequal hairs ; before flowering, re- 
curved, when in flower, erect, after flowering, reflexed. 
Calyx of 5 unequal sepals, very hairy : 2 outer ones 
very small, lanceolate, scarcely more than half the 
length of the others ; inner ones oblongly lanceolate, 
concave, bluntish. Petals 5, about double the length 
of the calyx ; flat, imbricate nearly all their length, 
round or slightly eraarginate, scarcely crenulate. 
Stamens 30 to 40, unequal in length, spreading. 
Hermen hairy. Style short, twisted at the base. 
Stigma capitate, 3-lobed, bristly. 
. An elegant little species, well adapted for the orna- 
menting of rock-work, or for growing at the front of 
flower borders, where its lively blossoms, which con- 
tinue in succession for a considerable time, make a 
handsome appearance. It is a native of various parts 
of Europe, growing in rocky mountainous situations ; 
*re have compared our plant with a fine specimen in 
Mr. Lambert's Herbarium, with which it agrees so 
exact, that the drawing might be supposed to have 
been made from the very specimen. It succeeds well 
in small pots, planted in a mixture of light sandy loam 
and peat; and cuttings strike root readily, taken off in 
the young wood as soon as ripened, and planted 
under hand-glasses, where they will soon strike root; 
it may also be raised from seeds, which sometimes 
ripen. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill, last summer. 



J 



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SS 



77 

HELIANTHEMUM vineale. 
Slender-trailing Sun-Rose. 

Sect VIII. Pseudocistus. Supra foL 2. 



H. vineaje, caule suffruticoso procumbente ; ramis adscendentibus 
piloso-tomentosis canescentibus, foliis ovato-oblongis supra ▼iri- 
dibus piloso-strigosis; subtus tomentoso-incanis, racemis simpli- 
cibus paucifloris calycibusque piloso-tomentosis canescentibus, 
petalis distinctis patent! bus. 

Helianthemum vineale. Per$. syn. 2. p. 77. DC. prodr. 1 . p. 277* 
Sprtmp. syit. 2. p. 590. Swt. kort. brit. p. 35. 

Cistns vinealia. Willden. $p. pL 2. p. 1195. 



A trailing suffrutescent plant, very much branched : 
branches ascending, long and slender, clothed with a 
hoary tomentum, and some long hairs intermixed. 
Leaves opposite, ovate or oblong, bluntish, the lower 
ones broadest and roundest, the upper side green, but 
covered with white rigid hairs, underneath clothed 
with a dense white tomentum, other leaves on the same 
plant are green on both sides ; after flowering, a great 
part of them become quite white ; pennately nerved. 
Petioles flat, fringed, not so long as the leaves. Ra- 
cemes terminal, few-flowered, nodding before the ex- 
pansion of the flowers, afterwards erect. Bractes lan- 
ceolate, acute, very hairy and fringed, the points re- 
flexed. Pedicles slender, very hairy and canescent, 
nodding before expansion, erect when in flower, and 
continuing so when in fruit. Calyx of 5 sepals, his- 
pidly hairy, canescent, 2 outer sepals small, linear, 
fringed, 3 inner ones broadly ovate, concave, with red 
margins. Petals 5, distinct, spreading, longer than the 
sepals, yellow, narrow at the base and broad at the 

x 



points. Stamens about 40, spreading. Ovarium trian- 
gular, with thick margins, pubescent. Style twisted 
round. Stigma capitate. Capsule 3-celled, with two or 
three seeds in each cell. 

A pretty trailing dwarf suffrutescent plant, the bran- 
ches very slender, and extending to a good distance 
round, so that it is very desirable for ornamenting 
rock-work, as it is covered with flowers a great part of 
the Summer ; after flowering, a great part of its leaves 
become quite white and silvery on both sides ; and we 
are not acquainted with any species that varies so much 
in the colour of its leaves at various seasons. Accord- 
ing to Decandolle, it is a native of Germany, Switzer- 
land, France, and Spain, so that it is quite hardy, or 
only wants the least protection in severe frost, thriving 
well in a mixture of light sandy loam and peat, or any 
other light sandy soil, succeeding best in rock-work, 
or to be grown in small pots ; for if planted in the open 
ground, it will be liable to suffer with too much mois- 
ture in Winter. Cuttings root readily, planted under 
hand-glasses, or it may be raised from seeds, which 
ripen plentifully. 

Our drawing was made from plants', in the Garden 
belonging to the Apothecaries' Company, at Chelsea, 
where they were raised by Mr. Anderson from seeds 
received from Germany. 



ss 




*7 

56 

HELIANTHEMUM canum. 
Hoary Sim-Rose. 

Sect VIIL PiEUDOciSTtts. Smprafil. 2. 



EL eantm, catxle suffruticoso procombente ramoso, ranris adscen- 
dentibus piloso-tomentosis incanis, foliis obovatis ovatis ovato-ob- 
longis rel ellipticis pilosis supra virescentibus snbtus subtomen- 
todo-canis, racemis simplicibus dichotomisve, pedicellis calycibas- 
que piloso-eanescentibus, petalis distinctis patentibus. 

Helianthemum oanum. Dunal in DC. prodr. l.p. 277. Sprtng. *y*t. 2. 
p. 690. Swt hart* brit, p. 35. 

Cistus oanus. Limn. tpec. 740. Jacq. aust. t. 277. 

Chamaecistiu 3. Chu. hist, p. 74. tc. 



A pretty little trailing suffruticose plant : branches 
numerous, spreading round in all directions, short and 
slender, tinged with red, clothed with a short downy ca- 
nescence, and some longish hairs intermixed. Leaves 
variable, obovate, ovate, oblongly ovate, elliptic or some- 
times lanceolate, blunt, or the upper ones rather acute, 
clothed with bristle-like hairs on both sides, green on 
the upper side, but having a whitish appearance, from 
the hairs with which the leaves are covered, underneath 
clothed with a dense hoary tomentum, large ones three- 
nerved from the base, or pennately veined. Petioles flat, 
fringed, shorter than the leaves. Racemes terminal, sim- 
ple or sometimes forked, several flowered, nodding be- 
fore the flowers expansion. Bractes lanceolate, acute, 
fringed. Pedicles slender, hairy, nodding before the ex- 
pansion of the flowers, erect when in bloom, afterwards 
reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, densely clothed with white 
hairs ; 2 outer sepals small, blunt; 3 inner ones roundly 
oval, short, concave, strongly nerved, about half the 
length of the petals, densely clothed with spreading 
white hairs. Petals 5, distinctly spreading, of a light 



yellow, obovate, narrow at the base, entire or slightly 
notched. Stamens from 40 to 50, spreading. Ovarium 
triangular, with thick margins, hairy. 

This neat little plant is quite hardy, and is a proper 
subject for the ornamenting of rock-work ; it also thrives 
and flowers well in a small pot, planted in a mixture of 
sandy loam and peat. It is nearly related to H. alpestre y 
already published, but nearer to H. vineale, and is some- 
times mistaken for H. marifolium, but is very distinct 
from that species, which we only know by Barrelier's 
figure, and fine specimens preserved in Mr. Lambert's 
Herbarium ; and we do not believe that living plants of 
it are at present in this country, the present and some 
other species being generally mistaken for it. Cuttings 
root freely, planted under hand-glasses in Autumn; it 
may also be raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully. 

Our drawing was taken from plants at the Nursery 
of Mr. Goltill, last Summer. 



6<r 




o<r 



53 



HELIANTHEMUM croceum. 
Saffron-coloured Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Euhblianthbmum. Supra foL l.—'Petalu luteU. 



H. croceum, caule fruticoso subprocwnbente ramoso : rami's simpli- 
cibus erectiuscnlis tomentoso-canescentibus, foliis tomentosiuscu- 
lis snbt&s canescentibus supra glands margine revolntis : inferi- 
oribus suborbiculatis ; mediis ellipticis obtusis ; superioribus lance- 
olatis acutiusGulis, stipnlis bracteisque erectis lineari-oblongis vil- 
lous apice setosis subrirescentibus, caljcibus glanoo-flavesoenti- 
bus minute pnbescentibus, petalis valde imbricatis. 

Helianthemum crocenm. DC.prodr. 1 . p. 279. Pen. syn. 2, «. 79. 
Swt. hart, tub, lond. p. 124. Hart. brit. 36. *. 66. 

Cistus erocens. Detf.jl. oil. 1. p. 422. 1. 110. 



Stems shrubby, procumbent, or sometimes nearly up- 
right, very rough and rugged : branches numerous, sim- 
ple or rarely branched, erect or nearly so, when culti- 
vated in a pot or in poor gravelly soil ; but in richer 
soil the branches are very long, procumbent, their points 
ascending, and spreading round to a great distance in 
all directions, densely clothed with a white woolly pu- 
bescence. Leaves of a silky appearance, densely clothed 
with a white starry pubescence, of a greyish white un- 
derneath and of a glaucous colour on the upper side, 
margins slightly revolute; the small lower leaves nearly 
orbicular or rounded, the middle ones elliptic or ob- 
long, obtuse ; upper ones nearly lanceolate and more 
acute. Petioles short, stellately pubescent, the pubes- 
cence close-pressed. Stipules linear, linearly-oblong gr 
lanceolate, of a greenish colour, clothed with spreading 
villous hairs, the margins more or less fringed, and the 
points tipped with bristly hairs, lower ones very small, 
upper ones elongated. Racemes terminal, 3 to 7-flower- 
ed, curved inwards before flowering, afterwards becom- 
ing erect. Bractes linearly oblong, nearly as long as the 



pedicles, villous, of a green colour. Pedicles densely ca- 
nescent, nodding before flowering, erect when in flower, 
and reflexed after flowering. Calyx of a yellow, glaucous 
colour, minutely pubescent. Sepals 5, the 2 outer ones 
very small, oblong, blunt, of a greener colour : inner ones 
ovate, concave, obtuse, membranaceous, strongly 4-ner- 
ved, the nerves more or less hairy. Petals 5, large, much 
imbricate, more or less crumpled, obcordate, of a bright 
saffron-colour at the base, and the upper part of a glossy 
yellow. Stamens 40 to 50 : filaments long and slender, 
straw-coloured: pollen bright yellow. Germen densely 
tomentose. Style smooth, slender at the base and thick- 
ened upwards; curved round at the bottom. Stigma ca- 
pitate, papillose. 

Our drawing was mpde from an unusually strong 
plant, growing in the rock- work of the garden belong* 
mg to the Apothecaries' Company, at Chelsea, where it 
covered more than the space of a yard in diameter, and 
made a grand appearance when covered with flowers. 
It is a native of Barbary, and the South of Europe, 
and is all the better for a slight covering in severe frosty 
weather; though it will succeed well through a mild Win- 
ter without the least protection. We have seen specimens 
of it in Mr. Lambert's Herbarium, that were marked by 
Dunal himself, so that we are certain of ours being his 
species. It succeeds well in any light sandy soil, and may 
be grown in rock- work or in any tolerable dry situation, 
where k will flower better than if kept in pots, though 
it is well to preserve a few in pots, which can be kept 
in frames or some place under cover in severe frosty 
weather. Young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, 
from July to September, will strike root readily. 



*J 



1U. 




JZartML. 



A4 fyj&tywm Ja*W& 



W2&US+. 



V 



V J/ 



111 

HELIANTHEMUM glaucum. 

Glaucous-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. SuprafoL 7. 
•. Petalis luteii. 



H. glaucum, caule suffiruticoso ramoso, ramis adscendentibus tomen- 
toso-incanis apice hispidis, foliis margine vix revolutis ciliatis 
utrinque tomentosis subtus incanis supra viridi-glaucescentibus ; 
inferioribtts orbiculatis ; ceteris ellipticis lanceolato-oblongis, sti- 
pulis bracteisque pubescentibus vindibus, pedicellis calycibusque 
nirsutis, pilis albidis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 279. n. 80. 

Helianthemum glaucum. Pars. syn. 2. p. 78. Spremg. tyst. 2. p. 602. 
*. 78. Swt. hart. brit. ed. 2. p. 42. n. 72. 

Cistus glaucus. Canon, icon. 3. p. 31. t. 261. nee Desf. 



Stem suffrutescent, erector ascending, much branched : 
branches spreading, ascendant, clothed with a white 
woolly down, hairy upwards. Leaves opposite, petiolate, 
slightly revolute at the edges, which are fringed ; densely 
clothed on both sides with a short close woolly pubes- 
cence, underneath white or hoary, the upper side of a 
bluish glaucous colour : lower ones broadest, broadly 
oval or nearly round and obtuse : the upper ones nar- 
rower and more acute. Petioles hairy and canescent. 
Stipules a little longer than the petioles, of a greener co- 
lour. Racemes terminal, many-flowered, clothed with 
soft wool and spreading hairs amongst the flowers, nod- 
ding before expansion, afterwards becoming erect. 
Bractes similar to the stipules. Pedicles short, woolly, 
and bearing hairs intermixed with the wool, nodding 
before expansion, erect when in flower, afterwards re- 
flexed. Flowers rather small, pale yellow. Calyx of 5 
sepals, densely woolly, and numerous hairs intermixed : 



the two outer sepals very small, spreading, and of a 
greener colour : inner ones ovate, concave, veined, hoary. 
Petals 5, of a pale yellow, obovately ovate, rounded at 
the end. Stamens numerous, of various lengths, spread- 
ing : Jilaments straw-coloured : pollen golden yellow. 
Germen tomentose. Style bent a little at the base, shor- 
ter than the stamens. Stigma capitate. 

For the opportunity of giving a figure of this pretty 
species, we are obliged to Robert Barclay, Esq. from 
whose collection, at Bury Hill, fine specimens, in full 
flower, were sent us in August last ; this is the only 
collection in which we have seen it for some time ; for 
being a native of the South of Europe, it is very liable to 
be killed in severe Winters, if it be not a little protected ; 
a common garden pot, placed over the plant, or the co- 
vering of a mat, or a little dry litter, in severe frost, will 
protect it very well, giving it free access to the air in 
mild weather, that it may not be drawn up tender ; a 
mixture of light sandy loam and peat suits it very well ; 
and a few plants should be kept in pots, to be preserved 
in frames, or in the greenhouse in Winter ; they can 
then be turned out, and planted in the borders, or in 
rock- work, in Spring ; a few plants of each sort might 
also be kept continually in pots, as nothing can make 
a more brilliant and neat appearance, than a collection 
of the different sorts grown in pots, and standing toge- 
ther in a close mass ; the branches, as they spread over 
the pots, and are all covered with bloom, make a very 
splendid appearance ; and although the flowers drop 
every evening, they are succeeded by others for a length 
of time ; and if cut off as soon as overblown, the young 
shoots that spring forth will be again covered with bloom, 
which will continue till late in Autumn ; young cuttings, 
planted under hand-glasses, in Spring or Autumn, will 
soon strike root ; young plants may also be raised from 

SCCQS* 



J 



?* 




7* 



20 



HEUANTHEMUM leptophyllum. 
Narrow-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. EtTHELTANTttKMUM. Supra, fd. 7. 
• PeteJjf fafefr. DC. prodr* 1. p. 270. 



H. leptvpkylbtm, oathfoffirmtieotoligaotostibprooiiiiibeBte ramoto: 
ramis erectia ant adscetodentibns tomentotiuactilig snbcinereis, 
foliis angnstit oblongQ-linearibus in petiolam brevem attefluatis 
margtae revolotia tttbths brevlte* tomentosfr-ciiieraa snprA gla- 
brraacalit viridibat, atipalis adbolati* piloaia petiolo vix longiori- 
boa, raoettit longis, calyoitm* piloao4or$iitia 9 petalk radalato* 
orenatis basi imbricati*. 

HeHaotbemam leptophyHam. Ihmal in DC. prodr. 1. p. 270. «. 82. 
, ftmsi^. «yrf. t*#. 3. p. 6*2. si. 82. 5wf. tor#. 6ril. p. 96. *. 69.— 
JSam5tfo/442. 

Ciataa Batrelieri, Dot. mdg. 287L «rd. spurn* noa DG 

Cbtua stecbadifoliaa. Forhdoitontai. 



iS'/it* shrubby, hard and woody at the base, ascend- 
ing or procumbent, clothed with a rugged brown bark, 
much branched ; branches spreading in various direc- 
tions, ascending, slender, clothed with a loose grey 
tomentum. Leaves opposite, the upper one often al- 
ternate, narrow, oblongly linear, bluntish, attenuated 
at the base into a short petiole, the margins much 
rolled back, underneath strongly nerved, and clothed 
with a short dense grey tomentum; the upper side 
channelled, of a dark glossy green and slightly pubes- 
cent, the points tipped with short hairs. Stipules small, 
subulate, hairy, scarcely longer than the petioles, and 
tipped with a fascicle of short bristle like hairs, tta- 
cemes long and loose, many-flowered, nodding before 
expansion, afterwards becoming erect. Sractes small, 
linear or lanceolate, hairy and fringed. Peduncles red- 
dish brown, woolly, nodding before expansion, erect 
when in flower, and reflexed when in fruit. Calyx of 



5 sepals, the 2 outer ones very small, lanceolate, con- 
cave, ciliate and tipped with bristle like hairs : 3 inner 
ones ovate, concave, strongly 4-nerved, with membra- 
naceous margins, the nerves warted with brown warts, 
and villosely hairy. Petals 5, imbricate, broadly obo- 
vate, the edges undulate and slightly crenulate, of a 
light yellow, with a saffron coloured crescent shaped 
mark near the base. Stamens about 40, rather shorter 
than the style ; filaments slender, smooth, pale yellow. 
Germen silky. Style twisted at the base, oblique, slen- 
der at the base, and thickened upwards. Stigma capi- 
tate, papillosely fimbriate. 

Our drawing of this plant was taken from one obli- 
gingly communicated to us by Mr. Anderson, from the 
Chelsea Botanic Garden, last September, when it was 
in full bloom for the second time that Summer, the dry 
weather setting in at the season that they were in bloom 
the first time, which made the blossoms soon drop, and 
when the wet set in, they produced fresh blooming 
shoots ; and many of the species were flowering again 
in Autumn as fine as in the Spring. Mr. Anderson 
had received this species under the name of H. stacba- 
difolium, which, as M. Decandolle remarks, is the gar- 
den name for it ; he also had it from Mr. Webb, under 
the name of H. Barrelieri, under which name it is 
figured in the Botanical Magazine, on Mr. Webb's au- 
thority ; but it is very different from H. Barrdieri of 
Decandolle and Tenore ; that species belongs to quite 
a different section : we showed our drawing to M. La- 
gasca, who immediately recognized it as his H. angusti- 
folhm> which is the synonym given by M. Decandolle. 
It is a native of Spain and the South of Europe, and 
succeeds well on rock-work, in a sheltered situation ; 
or it will thrive well in pots, in an equal mixture of 
sandy loam and peat; cuttings root readily planted 
under hand-glasses in Autumn ; it may also be raised 
from seeds, which are sometimes ripened. 



7' 



60. 




JTMrnre AL 



A*. *, SAOjm^rtrJK; 



7' 



60 



HELIANTHEMUM serpyllifoUum. 

Serpyllum-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foil. 
• Petalii hUeis. 



H« $erpglhfoHum, caule suffiruticoso proeumbente raraosissimo: ra- 
mis adscendentibus basi glabris apice pilosinsculis, foliis oblongo- 
ellipticis margine snbreTolntis subt&s toraentoso-incanis ; snprk 
intense ▼iridibas nitidis primtim pilosiasculis dein glabris, stipulis 
bracteisque viridibns riliatis, caljcibus aonminatis hjalinis canes- 
centibas pnbe snbinconspicna : nervis parce pilosis, petalis dis- 
tinctis patentissimis. 

Heliantbemnm serpyllifolinm. MilL diet. n. 8. DC.prodr. 1. p. 280. 
Spreng. syst. veg. 2. p. 593. Swt. hart. brit. p. 35. n. 60. 



Stem suffruticose, procumbent, very much branched : 
branches crowded, spreading round in all directions, 
the points ascending, smooth and glossy on the lower 

Eart, and warted here and there, the upper part slightly 
airy on the young shoots. Leaves opposite, crowded, 
generally distichously spreading and imbricate, flat, or 
the margins slightly revolute, underneath clothed with 
a dense white tomentum, the upper side smooth, of a 
glossy green, hairy while young, the margins more or 
less fringed with rather distant hairs, which are some- 
times singly, and sometimes in small tufts : lower leaves, 
and those on the small branches, roundly oval, blunt- 
ish : upper ones, and those on the long shoots, oblongly 
elliptic, or elliptically lanceolate, more acute. Petioles 
shorter than the stipules, slightly pubescent. Stipules 
green, linear, acute, very much fringed with long bristly 
hairs. Racemes terminal, several-flowered, nodding be- 
fore the expansion of the flowert, afterwards lengthen- 
ing out and erect. Bractes linear, resembling the sti- 



pules, also very much fringed. Pedicles downy, nod- 
ding before expansion, nearly erect when in bloom, 
afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, the 2 outer ones 
very small, oblongly linear, bluntish, much fringed 
with bristly hairs, the three inner ones slightly pubes- 
cent, elliptically lanceolate, concave, acute, transparent 
and membranaceous, strongly 4-nerved, the nerves 
green, and thinly clothed with hairs, the points also 
tipped with hairs. Petals 5, distinct, very much spread- 
ing, not at all imbricate, obovate, very narrow at the 
base, of a bright yellow colour, with an elegant orange 
coloured circle near the base. Stamens about 70 ; fila- 
ments long and slender, about the length of the style, 
pale yellow. Germen clothed with silky hairs. Style 
nearly straight, smooth, thickening upwards* Stigma 
capitate, papillose. 

The present species is readily distinguished from all 
others by its leaves growing in a distichous form. It is 
a native of Somersetshire, we having discovered it there 
in the Autumn of 1826, when we visited that part; we 
observed it in a bye-lane, leading from Failand-hill to 
the Farm of Mr. J. Mattocks, of Honour, near Port- 
bury, and no other sort grew there ; we have been since 
informed by Mr.T. Harding, Gardener to the Rev. F. Bea- 
don, of North Stoneham, Hants, to whom we showed 
our figure, that he also observed it near Wells, in Somer- 
setshire, where he was immediately struck with it as a 
distinct species; it is quite hardy, and is a very pretty 
plant for decorating rock-work, thriving well in any 
light sandy soil. Cuttings of it root readily, planted un- 
der hand-glbsses, the latter end of Summer or Autumn. 
Our drawing was made at the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, 
of the King's-road, Chelsea. 



7* 



34 



HELIANTHEMTJM vnlgare. 

Common Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhblianthemum. Supra, foil. 
* Petalu tuteis. 



H. vulgare, caulc suffruticoso procumbente ramoso ; ramis elonga- 
ftis, foliis margine vix revolutis subtfts inoano-cioereis : supra vi- 
ridibus pilosis subciliatis : inferioribua suborbiculatis : mediis 
orato-elliptiois superioribus oblongis, stipulis oblongo-linearibus 
ciliatis petiolo longioribns, racemis laxis, pedicellis calycibusque 
pilosis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 280. 

Helianthemum rulgare. G&rt.firuct. 1. 1. 76. Pen. eyn. 2. p. 79. 
Swt. kort. wb. land. p. 124. Hart. brit. p. 85. ft. 61. 

Cistus Helianthemum. Linn, spec 1, p. 744. Flor. dun. t* 101. 
Snu eng. hot* 1821. 



Stems suffruticose, procumbent, very much branched : 
branches spreading in all directions, ascending, elon- 
gated, slightly hairy, the upper part clothed with a 
hoary tomentum . Leaves very variable, petiolate ; lower 
ones nearly round or broadly ovate, ana bluntly round* 
ed : middle ones ovately elliptic or oblong ; upper ones 
elongated, oblong, or lanceolate, acute, slightly revo- 
lute at the margins, upper side green and hairy, and 
punctated with numerous minute dots, which occa- 
sions a roughness, underneath clothed with a close- 
pressed dense white tomentum : the margins more or 
less ciliate. Petioles slender, clothed with close-pressed 
hairs. Stipules leaf-like, linearly lanceolate, acute, hairy 
and fringed, sometimes about the length of the petioles 
and sometimes double the length, upper ones longest 
and broadest. Racemes terminal, loose, many-flowered, 
nodding and involute before the expansion of the flow- 
ers, afterwards becoming erect. Bractes lanceolate, 
shorter than the stipules, hairy and fringed, from half 
to one-third the length of the pedicles. Pedicles clothed 

k 2 



with a short white tomentum and a few hairs inter- 
mixed, nodding before the flowers expand, erect when 
in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals ; the 
two outer ones small, oblong or ovate, obtuse, very hairy 
and fringed ; 3 inner ones ovately lanceolate, acute, 
concave inwards, membranaceous, strongly 4-nerved, 
the nerves very hairy. Petals 5, variable in breadth, 
obovate or broadly wedge-shaped, or sometimes round- 
ed at the points, the margins generally a little crenate, 
generally more or less imbricate, but sometimes distinct, 
of a bright yellow ; in some plants having a bright 
orange-coloured lunulate spot near the base, in others 
of a plain yellow. Stamens about 70 ; filaments smooth, 
scarcely as long as the style. Germen downy. Style 
smooth, nearly straight, or a little bent towards the 
point* Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing of this species was taken from plants 
growing wild in Croome Hurst Wood, near Croydon, 
in which neighbourhood all the banks and sides of the 
hedges are covered with it, the soil being of a chalky 
nature, in which it delights ; in the same wood we, in 
company with Mr. Charlwood, discovered a large patch 
of H. surrejanum, most probably the very one from 
which the late Mr. Dickson originally procured his 
plant, which is somewhat altered by culture, as may be 
seen by comparison of our figure of that species, and 
the branch given at the bottom of this plate; a plant of 
it which we planted in our garden has already much 
broader and flatter leaves, more like Mr. Dickson's 
plant ; the present is certainly the plant of Dillenius's 
Hortus Elthamensis, as it agrees entirely with his figure 
and description : both species may be grown in rock- 
work, and if some chalk be added to the soil, so much 
the better; they are readily propagated by cuttings, 
planted under hand-glasses in Autumn. 

1. The commonest yellow variety. 3. A scarcer variety, with an orange co- 
loured spot at the base of each petal. 3. Helianthemum sxrrQanum, from a spe- 
cimen gathered growing wild in Croome Hurst Wood, Surry, differs from the 
cultivated plant already figured, in being weaker, with fewer flowered racemes, 
and the leaves being canescent underneath. 



7* 



"' 




7* 



64 



HELIANTHEMUM vulgare p multiple*. 
Common Sun-Rose, two double varieties. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthbmum. Supra fol.l.—* Petalu luteis. 



H. vulgare, caule suffruticoso procumbente ramoso; ramis elon- 
gatis, foliis margine vi\ revolutis subtus incano-cinereis : supra 
▼iridibus pilosis subciliatis : inferioribus suborbiculatis : mediis 
ovato-ellipticis su peri ori bus oblongis, stipulis oblongo-linearibus 
ciliatis petiolo longioribus, racemis laxis, pedicellis caljcibnsque 
pilosis. DC. prodr.l.p. 280. Supra fol.&4. 

multiplex, floribus plems. Supra. 

* procumbent, caule procumbente. Supra Jig. I. 

*• adscendeuM, caule suberecto-adscendente. Supra Jig. 2. 



Differs from the common single varieties at folio 34, 
by the flowers being double ; the largest figure in our 
plate, which is the old double variety, differs from the 
other in being more procumbent, and the flowers are 
fuller ; it varies in strength and in the length of its ra- 
cemes, also in the size of its flowers, according to the 
strength of the plant ; when grown in small pots it 
lays flat on the ground in a close tuft, its leaves are very 
small, having quite a different appearance from those 
plants that are grown out in the borders, where the 
leaves attain four times the size, and the racemes and 
flowers are much larger : the other variety, No. 2 of our 
plate, which is known by the name of Mr. Lee's new 
double yellow, is distinguished by being more erect and 
shrubby, and the flowers do not generally expand to the 
centre, but are there terminated by a greenish close tuft, 
not unlike a calyx, and the plant is altogether of stron- 
ger growth than the other ; the same difference in habit 
we have observed in the common single varieties, when 
growing together wild. 



Both the present varieties are very desirable for rock- 
work, as they are quite hardy, and need not the least 
protection, or they may be grown in small pots, where 
they make a handsome appearance when covered with 
flowers, and may be turned out of them, and planted 
into the ground at any season without injury. Cuttings 
of them, planted under hand-glasses, after they have 
done flowering, will strike root readily, and will soon 
become nice young plants. Our drawing was made at 
the Nursery of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, last Summer. 



& 



5 




7+ 



28 



HELIANTHEMUM surrejanum. 

Dotted-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhblianthemum. Supra, foil. 
* Pelatis luteii. 



H. surrejanum, cade svffmticoae procumbente, foliis oblongrs or** 
tia elliptic* laoceolatiafe Tiridibva naargiae m revolutia: supra 
horsntitacnlik mibtot ramiaque atellato«pabescentibns 9 racemit 
mnltiAoria, petali* lanceolatia aubdentato-laciniatis, aiaminibufl 
breYisaimis. 

Helianthcmum sumjanum. MM. did. n. 15* Pen. syn. 2. J>. 78. 
DC.prtkh.l.p.ZSQ. Spreng. jytf. veg . a. j* 69B. 8wt.hart.mA, 
&md.aM2& Bart. Brit, av96.fi. 02. 

CiiUu aurrejami* Liiw. fliec. 748. Willden. 9p. pi 2. p. 1202. 
S»iM jBip. io*. 2207. Compmd.Jbr.brit.ed.4.p.9S. 



Stem suffruticose, procumbent, much branched, 
spreading in all directions: branches more or less 
waited with brownish purple warts, and clothed with 
fascicles of short stellate hairs. Leaves variable, lower 
ones nearly round or broadly ovate, others oblong, el- 
liptic or broadly lanceolate, obtuse or scarcely acute, 
green on both sides, but paler underneath, flat, or the 
margins very slightly revolute, dotted with numerous 
small dots, thinly clothed with short hairs on the upper 
side, and with fascicles of short stellate ones on the 
lower. Petioles hairy, shorter than the stipules. jSW- 
putes linearly-lanceolate, flat, or their margins slightly 
reflexed, ciliate, longer than the petioles. Racemes 
terminal, many-flowered, nodding before the flowers 
expand, the point involute, but lengthening out and 
becoming erect after the expansion of the flowers. 
Bractes short and flat, clothed with short hairs, the 
margins fringed. Pedicles nodding before the expan* 
sion of the flowers, erect when in bloom, afterwards 
reflexed, canescently tomentose, and also clothed with 



fascicles of short stellate hairs. Calyx of 5 sepals ; the 
two outer ones very short, oblong, blunt, clothed with 
a mealy p afcescoii o c ; inner ores ovate, obtuse, con- 
cave, membranaceous, yellowish, strongly 4-nerved, 
slightly covered with a mealy pubescence, the nerves 
clothed with tufts of npnwwling hairs. Petals 5, very 
narrow, lanceolate, acute, generally toothed or lacerate, 
seldom entire, quite distinct and spreading, sometimes 
scarcely as long, at other times nearly double the length 
of the calyx, of a plain yellow cokmr. Stamens about 
50^ineqwalinlen^, butvarysh(M^ scarcely as long 
as the germen: JUammU* smooth, yellow, G*n*e* 
downy. dfepfe smooth, slender, send twisted at the bate, 
and thickened upwards. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Specimens of this rare plait were brought to us last 
Skimmer by Mr. David Don, from tbe garden of Mrs. 
Dickson, of Croydon, in Surrey, where the plant h ad 
been planted by the late Mr. Dickson, who discovered 
it growing wild near that place ; but at present, we 
believe, no person knows where to find it wild ; or it 
has perhaps been sometimes overlooked or confused 
with JH. vulgar* ; we heard of its being found fast year 
near Dartibrd* in Kent ; but as we have not seen speci- 
mens of it, we are not certain if it really were the same 
species; it is certainly a very likely situation for it: 
we observed the flowera of it corns much larger in 
Autumn, than they did in Summer, nearly equal in 
size to the COstus sampswi/blius of die Botanical Ma- 
gazine, which will most probably prove to be the same 
species, a& Dr. Sims was rather inclined to believe 
when he published it ; or perhaps that may he a hybrid 
production between the present and some other spe- 
cie*. The present plant is auite hardy, thriving well in 
rock-work or by the side ot a bank, where it will not 
be killed by too much moisture ; it may also be grown 
in pots, where it will flower very fine, and will not grow 
so luxuriant Cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, 
root readily. 



7* 




& , 



,■ j. 



y* 



69 



HELIANTHEMUM grandiflorum. 
Large-jlotcered Sun- Rose. 



Soct. IX. Euhklianthemum. Supra foL 7. 



H. grandiftornm, canle saffiraticoso adscendento, minis piloso-hirsu- 
t», foliu supmoribna snbplanis oblongis pilosiaaculis siipri viri- 
dibns snbtto nunc viridibtis none dilate cinetois, stipulU ciliatu 
petiolo sablongioribua, floribus mqpiis, caljcibus subhirsutis. 
DC.prod.l.p.2$0. 

ffoliantnemum grandiflonrm. BC. fi.fr. 4. p. 821. Swt. kort. brit. 
p. JK>. ». 64. 

Girtus gtandiflonis. Soap. emrn. ed. 2. n. 648. |. 25* 



Stem suffruticose, much branched, ascending : bram* 
ekes hairy when young, but becoming at length nearly 
smooth, spotted or tinged with light purple. Leaves 
opposite, flat, or nearly so, oblong, bluntish, clothed 
with short closely-pressed hairs, green on both sides, 
or sometimes a little whitish at the back ; young ones . 
more hairy than the older ones. Petioles short, pubes- 
cent. Stipules linearly lanceolate, acute, fringed, longer 
than the petioles. Racemes terminal, nodding before 
expansion, afterwards becoming erect. Bractes scarcely 
so long as the pedicles, resembling the stipules, but 
rather shorter. Pedicles downy, nodding before the 
expansion of the flowers, then becoming erect, after 
flowering reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, a little hairy, the 
hairs pressed inwards; two outer ones very small, 
more hairy than the inner ones, fringed : inner ones 
ovate, concave, membranaceous between the nerves. 
Petals 5, large, broadly obovate or obcordate, very 
much imbricate, of a bright straw-colour. Stamens 
numerous, unequal in length. Style twisted, about the 



length of the stamens, slender at the base, and thick- 
ened upwards. Stigma capitate. 

According to M. Decandolle, the present species is 
a native of the Alps and Pyrenees, also of Tauria; but 
we believe the Taurian plant to be a distinct species, 
being of quite a different habit, and laying quite flat 
on the ground, where its branches spread to a consi- 
derable distance ; we saw several plants of it last year 
at the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, 
at Fulham, who raised it from seeds received under the 
name of Cistus tauricus. 

Our drawing of the present plant was made at the 
Nursery of Mr. Colvill ; we also received specimens 
of it from Mr. Mackay, of the Clapton Nursery. It is 
nearly related to H. vulgar e, but is of much stronger 
growth, and its flowers are of a paler colour, and con- 
siderably larger. It makes a pretty plant for the adorn- 
ing of rock- work, or it may be grown in a small pot, 
and will endure our Winters, except very severe ones, 
without protection. Cuttings of it, planted under hand- 
glasses, in Autumn, strike root freely. 



; 




7" 



106 



HELIANTHEMUM tauricum. 

Taurian Sun-Rose. 



8eCt. IX. EtJH ELIANTHBMUM . Svprafol. 7. 



H. tawicwm, caule svfiniticoso ramosissimo procumbent*; ranus 
procumbentibus piloso-hirsutis, foliis oblongo-lanceolatis margine 
gubreyolutis utrinque pilosis supra viridibus subtus pallidioribus, 
stipulis lanceolato-linearibus ciliatis petiolo longioribus, floribus 
nagais, calyeibus nitidis subhireutis, pstalu imbricolia. 

Helianthemam tauhcmm. FUcker M*s. S*>$. hmrt. brti. edU. 9. jv4*. 
a. 79. 



Stem snffruticose, very much branched, trailing flat 
on the ground : branches lengthening out to a consi- 
derable distance, spreading flat on the ground, thickly 
clothed with entangled hairs, which gives them a rough 
appearance. Leaves opposite, oblong, or oblongly lan- 
ceolate, blunt, hairy on both sides, the margins slightly 
revolute, of a dark brownish green on the upper side, 
and rather paler underneath, but not hoary. Stipules 
very long, lanceolately linear, acute, hairy and fringed, 
more than twice the length of the petioles. Racemes 
terminal, many-flowered, nodding before the flowers 
expand, afterwards becoming erect. Peduncles very 
hairy, with short tomentum underneath. Bractes simi- 
lar to the stipules. Pedicles tomentosely hairy, nodding 
before the flowers expansion, erect when in bloom, af- 
terwards reflexed. Flowers large, pale yellow. Calyx 
of 5 sepals ; the two outer ones small, very hairy, spread- 
ing : the three inner ones ovate, strongly veined, hairy, 
but glossy, the nerves of a reddish purple. Petals 5, 
broad, imbricate, broadly obovate, uneven at the edges, 
of a pale yellow. Stamens numerous, spreading : filaments 

2 E 



yellow : pollen orange-coloured. Style bent at the base, 
smooth. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing of this pretty species was made from a 

Slant at the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and 
lilne, at Fulham, who raised it from seeds several years 
since, that had been given them by A. P. Hove, Esq. 
as the H. tauricum of Dr. Fischer ; it has most probably 
been confused with H. grandiftorum by many authors, as 
that species is said to be a native of Tauria, as well as of 
the South of Europe ; but when the plants are seen grow- 
ing together, no two species had need appear more dis- 
tinct, the present spreading flat on the ground, and ex- 
tending its branches round to a great distance, and these 
are only slightly suffrutescent at the base, whereas H. 
grandifiorum grows upright, or its branches spreading 
and ascendent, forming a neat little bushy shrub. 

The present plant is well adapted for the ornamenting 
of rock-work, as its spreading branches will coyer a 
good space in a short time, and it is easily kept within 
bounds, by cutting in the longest branches occasionally, 
the young branches that then shoot out will all be ter- 
minated by racemes of flowers, so that by that means a 
succession of bloom may be kept up from the latter end 
of May till October; it succeeds well in a light sandy 
soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very 
well ; young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses the 
latter end of Summer, will strike root in a few days. 



77 







fu£i,JJt.«j •, J A &U. 



77 



73 

HELIANTHEMUM barbatum. 
Bearded Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Euhbliahthkmum. Supra foL 7. 
* PetaiuhUeii. 



H. barbatum, canle suffrnttooso erecto ramosiaaimo : rami* fascicu- 
lato-pilosis, foliis hirsutis utriiKjue viridibtis : inforioribus snbro* 
tnndo-oTatia ; superioribus ellipticis, stipnlis oblongis ciliato-hir- 
sutia petiolo longioribua, racemis longis hirauto*barbatia multiflo- 
ria, ctrijoiboa verrocoria hirautis, peUlU erenulatis baai imbrica- 
te. 

Heliantbemum barbatum. Pert. tyn. 2. p. 79. Willd. cnum. tupp. 
p. 39. Link emtm. 2. p. 76. 

Cistaa barbatoa. Lam. <£cf. 2. p. 24. 



Stem suffruticose, erect or ascending, very much 
branched : branches erect, thickly clothed with bunches 
of spreading shaggy hairs, as is every other part of the 
plant, except the corolla. Leaves opposite, crossing 
each other, rather crowded, underneath strongly nerved, 
bluntish: lower ones nearly round or ovate: upper 
ones elliptic, all hairy on both sides, the hairs in stel- 
late bunches ; of a pale green colour on both sides, but 
palest underneath. Petioles rather long, a little flat- 
tened on the upper side, and rounded on the lower, 
Stipules leaf-like, oblong, bluntish, fringed, a little 
longer than the petioles. Racemes terminal, many- 
flowered, densely hairy or bearded with long hairs, 
much lengthened after flowering, curved inwards be- 
fore the flowers expansion, afterwards erect. Bractes 
oblong or ovate, obtuse, fringed. Pedicles of a brown- 
ish purple, nodding before flowering, erect when in 
flower, afterwards recurved. Calyx of 5 sepals, the 2 
outer ones small, ovate or oblong, obtuse, inner ones 

u 



roundly ovate, obtuse, concave, strongly 4-nerved, the 
nerves of a brownish purple, much waited, and thickly 
clothed with bunches of spreading villous white hairs. 
Petals 5, obovateor obcordate, with crenulate margins, 
more or less crumpled, of a bright yellow, rather dark- 
est at the base. Stamens from 60 to 70, longer than 
the style ; filaments smooth, slender, yellow : pollen 
bright yellow. Germen sericeous. Style shorter than 
the filaments, twisted at the base, thickening upwards. 
Stigma capitate, papillose. 

The present very distinct species, is a native of the 
South of Europe, but succeeds well in the open air of 
this country, without any protection ; it is a very de- 
sirable plant for the adorning of rock- work, and suc- 
ceeds well in any. light sandy soil ; it also thrives and 
flowers well in small pots, in which manner a collection 
of the various species and varieties of this handsome 
genus may be grown to great advantage, and will 
make a fine show when in bloom ; and those sorts that 
are rather tender, may have a mat or two thrown over 
them in severe frosty weather, which is all the protec- 
tion they require, this will also answer the same pur- 
pose as rock-work, where it is inconvenient to erect it ; 
and the greater part of them are cheap plants, so that 
a collection may be obtained at a small expence ; and 
what sorts cannot be bought at one nursery, maybe 
procured at some of the others. Cuttings of them all 
strike root freely, planted under hand-glasses, in August 
or September. 

Our drawing was made from a plant in the extensive 
collection at the Garden belonging to the Apothecaries' 
Company at Chelsea, where it was raised from seed 
that Mr. Anderson received from France. 



ys 



80 



HELIANTHEMUM nummularium. 
Money-wort-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Eg hklianthemum. Supra fol. 7. — • PetaKs luteu. 



H. nummularium, caule suffruticoso : ramis procumbentibus hirsu- 
tls, foliis inferioribns orbicularis ; superioribus oblongo-linearibds 
hirsutis subtus viridi-cinereis, stipulis lineari-obloDgis potiolo 
dupl6 longioribas, racemis catycibuaqne hirsutis, petalis snbim* 
bricatis. 

Helianthemum nummularimn. DC.prodr. 1./?. 280. MitLdict. ti.11. 
Swt. hart. bit. p. 35. n. 07. 

Helianthemum obscrnnm nuramnlarium. DC.fi.fr. 6. p. 624. 

Cistas Dummularios. *. Lin. tpee. 743. nee Detf. ct. Cav. 



/Staotsuffruticose, procumbent: branches long, spread- 
ing in all directions, thickly clothed with rigid hairs. 
Leaves variable, hairy on both sides, rough, flat, or the 
upper ones very slightly revolute, of a dull green on the 
upper side, and paler underneath : lower ones nearly 
orbicular or rounded, others ovate or elliptic, obtuse ; 
upper ones oblongly linear, acute, all hairy on both 
sides and ciliate. Petioles very short and very hairy. 
Stipules linearly oblong, hairy and fringed, double the 
length of the footstalks. Racemes several-flowered, 
curved inward before the flowers expand, afterwards 
lengthening out, and remaining erect. Bractes oblongly 
linear, hairy and ciliate. Peduncles brown, thickly clo- 
thed with hispid hairs, nodding before the flowers ex- 
pansion, nearly erect when expanded, after flowering 
reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, which are hispidly hairy : 
2 outer ones small, oblong, bluntish : inner ones con- 
cave, membranaceous, bluntish, 4-angled, middle an- 
gles of a brownish purple, outer ones green. Petals 5, 
slightly imbricate, obcordate, slender and distinct at 



the base, of a bright yellow, darkest at the bottom. 
Stamens about 80, about the length of the style : JUa- 
ments very slender, smooth, pale yellow: anthers 
small, attached to the filament by the back: pollen 
light orange-coloured. Germen clothed with close- 
pressed silky hairs. Style smooth, bent near the base. 
Stigma capitate, granular. 

1 he present plant is nearly related to H. vulgare, 
but is readily distinguished by its broader flat leaves, 
that are green on both sides; we believe it to be the 
H. obscurum of most authors ; but as the present name 
has the right of priority, that of obscurum may now be 
dropt altogether, as the H. obscurum of Decandolle is 
without doubt the H. barbatum of Lamarck, which is 
the oldest name ; that is a very distinct species from 
the present, always growing erect, whereas the present 
is always procumbent, and is much less hairy. It is 

?uite hardy, being a native of France, Switzerland, and 
taly, succeeding well in the open border, or in rock- 
work, thriving best in a light sandy soil : young cut- 
tings, planted under hand-glasses, root readily. 

Our drawing was made from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill, who received it from Switzerland. 

We have this Summer flowered plants of H. tomen- 
tosum (Cistus tomentosus of English Botany), brought 
from Scotland last year by Mr. D. Don, and they prove 
to be nothing more than H. vulgare, as has been already 
stated by Dr. Hooker : plants brought by us from the 
neighbourhood of Croydon, flowered by the side of it 
in our garden, and we could not perceive the least 
difference in them. 



7? 



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w 



109 

HELIANTHEMUM hirtum. 

Bristly-calyxed Sun- Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra fol. 17. 
* Petalis lutei*. 



H. hirtum, caule suffruticoso ramoso, ramis adscendentibus nume- 
rosia tomentoso-hirtis cinereis, foliis ovatis seu oblongis margine 
revolutis tomentoso-hirtis subtus canescentibus supra viridi-cine- 
reis, stipulis angustis petiolo sublongioribus, calycibus hirsutissi- 
mis albidis, petalis obcordatis imbricatis. 

Helianthemum hirtum. Pert. syn. 2. p. 70. DC. prodr. 1. p. 281. 
Spreng. syst. 2. p. 593. Swt. hart. brit. ed. 2. p. 42. n. 85. 

Cistus hirtus. Linn. spec. 744. Croon, toon. 2. p. 37. f. 146. Smith 
jtor.griBe. f. 601. 



Stewi suffrutescent, producing numerous branches 
from the base : branches ascending, clothed with a hoary 
canescence, and innumerable spreading hairs. Leaves 
opposite, the lower ones ovate, the others oblong, obtuse, 
revolute at the margins, thickly covered with spreading 
hairs : upper side of a pale green ; underneath clothed 
with a close white tomentum. Petioles short, hairy. 
Stipules rather small, but longer than the petioles, those 
at the upper leaves largest, very hairy. Racemes terminal, 
several-flowered, at first nodding, but becoming erect 
as the flowers expand. Bractes similar to the stipules, 
but rather larger. Pedicles slender, nodding before the 
flowers expansion, erect when in bloom, afterwards re- 
flexed, densely hairy. Calyx of 5 sepals, densely covered 
with spreading white hairs ; the two outer ones narrow, 
linear, spreading, of a brightish green : the inner ones 
ovate, acute, concave, strongly veined, of a pale whitish 
green colour. Petals 5, imbricate, obcordate, veined 
from the base, where they terminate in a saffron-coloured 
spot. Stamens numerous, of various lengths : filaments 

2f 



yellow : pollen golden yellow. Germen woolly. Style a 
little bent at the base, about the length of the stamens. 
Stignia a sort of club-shaped head. 

The present pretty species is a native of the South of 
Europe, and the Levant, and therefore requires a little 
protection in severe frosty weather; if planted out in 
rock- work, the covering of a mat or a little hay or straw, 
or any other dry covering, will be sufficient to protect 
it in the severe frost, giving it full admission to the air 
when the weather is mild ; or if the plants are not too 
large, a common garden pot placed close over them in 
frosty weather will preserve them very well. It is also 
a good plan to have some in small pots, to preserve in 
frames all the Winter ; they can then be turned out 
wherever they are wanted in Spring, as at that time 
they will grow very fast, and will soon make fine plants : 
a* mixture of sandy loam and peat is a very proper soil 
for them ; and young cuttings, planted under hand- 
glasses, in August or September, will strike root freely. 

Our drawing was made from a plant in the rock- work 
at the Botanic Garden belonging to the Apothecaries' 
Company, at Chelsea, in the Summer of 1828. 



J>0 




s<? 



89 



HELIANTHEMUM Andersoni. 

Mr. Anderson's Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foil. 
• Peialis lutexs. 



H. Anderxmi, caule suffruticoso procumbente ramoso ; ramis ad- 
scendentibus tomentoso-canescentibus, foliis oblougo-lanceolatis 
acutiusculis tomentosiusculis supra cinereis subtus canescentibus 
margine parum revolutis, stipulis lineari-subulatis ciliatis petiolifl 
paulo longioribus, calycibus tomentosis, petalis imbricatis. 



Suffrnticose, procumbent, very much branched, soon 
forming a large spreading dense tuft : branches ascend- 
ing; rather slender, densely clothed with a close-pressed 
white tomentum, as are the petioles, peduncles, pedi- 
cles, and calyx. Leaves opposite, oblongly lanceolate, 
bluntish or scarcely acute, the margins slightly rolled 
back, the upper side clothed with a thinnish loose 
wool, and of a greyish hoary colour, underneath clo- 
thed with a dense white tomentum. Stipules linearly 
subulate, fringed and terminated with longish hairs, 
rather longer than the petioles. Racemes terminal, long, 
many-flowered, nodding before the flowers expand, 
afterwards becoming erect. Bractes linear, acute, flat, 
of a green colour, broader than the stipules, their mar- 
gins tomentose. Pedicles densely clothed with a close- 
pressed white tomentum, nodding. before the flowers 
expansion, then becoming erect, afterwards becoming 
reflexed, and twisted when in fruit. Calyx persistent, 
clothed with a white tomeutum, also with woolly spread- 
ing hairs ; two outer sepals very small, ovately lanceo- 
late, bluntish : the three inner ones broadly ovate, 
concave inwards, scarcely acute, strongly 3 or 4-nerved, 

2 A 



transparent between the nerves, shpwing the yellow 
petals through before they expand. Petals 5, roundly 
obovate, very much imbricate, varying on the same 
plant from a bright yellow to a pale straw-colour, 
generally marked with a saffron-coloured spot near 
the base. Stamens numerous : jilamaits yellow : pollen 
orange-coloured. Germen tomentose. Style smooth, 
very slender, and twisted near the base, thickening gra- 
dually upwards. Stigma capitate, papillose. Capsule 
tomentose, large and inflated, triangular, three-celled, 
9 to 12-seeded. Seeds brown, angular, rough. 

This pretty and curious plant is of hybrid origin, 
having been produced from the seed of H. croceum, that 
was fertilized by the pollen of H.pulverulentum, in the 
rock-work, at the Apothecaries' Company's Garden at 
Chelsea, where it sowed itself last year, and this year 
produced flowering plants, that grew very fast, and 
were covered with flowers from May last, to the end of 
November ; the flowers were very variable, some being 
of a bright yellow, and others on the same plant, and 
sometimes on the same branch, of a pale straw-colour, 
so that they made a curious variegated appearance, the 
yellow flowers coming nearest to the female parent, 
and the straw-coloured ones approaching nearer to the 
male, which was a white-flowered species ; the form of 
the leaves and habit of the plant is also intermediate 
between the two. It is a very desirable plant for orna- 
menting rock-work, as it continues in flower for such 
a length of time, and is also a fast grower ; it also 
succeeds well in small pots, planted in a light sandy 
soil ; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses 
in Autumn, strike root readily. 

We have named it in compliment to our respected 
frietad, Mr. William Anderson, to whom we are obliged 
for the opportunity of making drawings of many rare 
species, which w* have not seen in any other collection. 



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76 



HELIANTHEMUM eriosepalon. 
Woolly-calyxed Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Ed helianthemum. Suprafol. 7. 
** Peialit allAs, roseis, rubrii vel dilute sulphureis. 



H.*rio$epahm f eanlibus ramosis procttmbentibua tomentosiusculia 
apice incanis, foliis lanceolatis acutis margine sub-revolutis utrin- 
que viridibus stellato-pilosis, stipulis linearibua acutis ciliaiis pe- 
ttolo daplo longioribas, racemo terminal! multifloro, calycibns to- 
meDtoso-pilosis, petalia obovatis crennlatis baai distinotis. 

Helianthemum eriosepalon. Swt. kvrt. brit.p. 469. ».96. 



Stems procumbent, rough and rugged, much branch- 
ed : branches spreading in all directions, slightly tomen- 
tose, the upper part more densely so and canescent. 
Leaves opposite, petioled, lanceolate, acute, the margins 
more or less uneven, a little undulate, and slightly re- 
volute, green on both sides, and clothed with fascicles 
of longish hairs, which are stellately spreading. Pe- 
tioles also clothed with fascicles of hairs, channelled on 
the upper side and rounded underneath. Stipules linear, 
acute, fringed with long hairs, green on both sides, ge- 
nerally about double the length of the footstalks. Ra- 
cemes long, tomentose, many-flowered, nodding before 
the expansion of the flowers, afterwards becoming erect. 
Pedicles densely tomentose, drooping before the expan- 
sion of the flowers, erect when in bloom, afterwards re- 
flexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, densely clothed with woolly 
hairs, the two outer ones very small, lanceolate, blunt- 
ish, channelled on the upper side, three inner ones ovate, 
unequal on one side, membranaceous, strongly 4*- nerved, 
concave on the upper side and convex below. Petals 5, 
obovate, crenulate, sometimes emarginate, of a pale sul- 



phur colour, with a yellow mark near the base. Sta- 
mens about 60, about the length of the style : filaments 
very slender, smooth, pale yellow ; pollen golden yellow. 
Oermen downy. Style smooth and bent a little near 
the base, thickening upwards. Stigma capitate, slightly 
3-lobed, papillose. 

The present plant is nearly related to H. sulpkweum, 
but differs sufficiently in habit, and in its woolly calyx, 
the calyx of H. sulphureum being glossy, and nearly 
smooth. The present is a very proper plant for adorn- 
ing rock-work, or to grow in small pots, and will stand 
the severity of our Winters in the open air without pro- 
tection, continuing in bloom the greater part of the Sum- 
mer ; it succeeds well in a light sandy soil, or a mix- 
ture of sandy loam and peat will suit it very well. 
Young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in Autumn, 
strike root immediately. 

Our drawing was made from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill, King's-road, Chelsea. 



J>2 




£2 



93 



HELIANTHEMUM stramineum. 

Straw-coloured Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foil. 
•• Petalii albis, roseis, rubris vel dilute sulphur eis. 



H. stramineum, caulibus ramosis elongatis procumbentibus apice 
tomentosiusculo-pubescentibus, foliis planis aut margine vix re- 
curvis supra viridibus pilosis subtustomentoso-incanis: inferioribus 
rotundo-ovatis obtusis: superioribus oblongo-lanceolatis acutius- 
culis, stipulis linearibus acutis ciliatis petiolo duplo longioribus, 
racemis multifloris, calycibus sthatis glabriusculis, petalis obovatis 
patentibus distinctis. 



Suffrutescent, procumbent, very much branched : bran- 
ches elongated, and spreading round to a considerable 
distance, thickly clothed with short hairs when young, 
and the upper part with a canescent tomentum. Leaves 
opposite, petiolate, flat, or very slightly recurved at the 
margins, the upper side of a dark green and very hairy, 
underneath clothed with a close white tomentum : lower 
ones roundly oval and obtuse ; the upper ones much 
longer, oblongly lanceolate, and more acute. Petioles 
short, hairy, flat on the upper side, and rounded un- 
derneath. Stipules linear, acute, fringed, more than 
double the length of the petioles, green on both sides. 
Racemes terminal, many-flowered, nodding before the 
expansion of the flowers, afterwards becoming erect. 
Bractes linear, acute, fringed, and hairy, about the 
length of, or nearly as long as the pedicles. Pedicles to- 
mentose, and clothed with short hairs, drooping before 
the expansion of the flowers, erect when they are ex- 
panded, afterwards reflex ed, and more or less twisted. 
Calyx of 5 sepals ; the two outer ones small, linear, dark 

2 B 



green, very hairy, and generally reflexed at the points; 
the three inner ones broadly ovate, bluntish, concave 
inwards, membranaceous, strongly 3 or 4-nerved, be- 
tween the nerves smooth and glossy, the nerves hairy. 
Petals 5, obovate, narrow at the base and rounded at 
the point, distinctly spreading, not at all imbricate, of 
a bright straw-colour. Stamens numerous, scarcely so 
long as the style: filaments smooth, yellow: pollen 
orange-coloured. Germen triangular, downy. Style 
smooth, twisted at the base, where it is very slender, 
becoming gradually thickened upwards. Stigma capi- 
tate, slightly 3-lobed, papillose. 

Our drawing of this pretty plant was made at the 
Nursery of Mr. Mackay, at Clapton, last Summer, where 
we saw several fine plants of it in full bloom ; we are 
not certain whether it is an original species, or a hybrid 
production, but most probably the latter ; as from its 
colour, we should suspect it to be intermediate between 
one of the white, and one of the yellow flowered spe- 
cies : it is a very free grower, and an abundant bloomer, 
and succeeds well in rock-work, or in a dry border ; or 
it may be grown in small pots, in a mixture of sandy 
loam and peat, when of course it will be more dwarf, 
and its flowers will not be quite so large, but still will 
make a handsome appearance, intermixed with other 
species and varieties ; in our opinion nothing can ap- 
pear more brilliant and interesting than a good collec- 
lection of the dwarf species when in bloom, if grown in 
pots and placed together in a group, that their diffe- 
rences may be more readily observed ; the present plant 
is readily increased by young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses, any time from the beginning of August to 
the end of September. 



S9 




M 



94 



HELIANTHEMUM stramineum multiplex. 
Full-flowered straw-coloured Sun- Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. SuprafoL 7. 
** Petalis albis, roseis, minis vel dilute sulphur eis. 



H. stramineum, caulibus ramosis elongatis procumbentibus apice 
tomentosiusculo-pubescentibus, foliis planis aut margine vix recur- 
vis supra viridibus pilosis subtus tomentoso-incanis : inferioribus 
rotunoo-ovatis obtasis: superioribus oblongo-lanceolatis acutius- 
culis,. stipulis Hsearibus acutis ciliatis petiolo duplo longioribus, 
racemis multifloris, calycibus striatis glabriusculis, petalis obovatis 
patentibus distinctis. SuprafoL 93. 

multiplex, caulibus apice adscendegtibus, foliis minoribus, petalis 
multiplicibus. Supra 94. 



. Suffirutescent, much branched : branches slender, pro- 
cnmbent, the points ascending, warted a little, 'and 
thinly clothed with a short woolly pubescence. Leaves 
opposite, petiolate, smaller than in the single variety, 
flat or slightly recurved at the margins, the upper side 
hairy and of a dark green, underneath clothed with a 
white tomentum : lower ones nearly round, or roundly 
oval, obtuse ; the upper ones oblong or lanceolate, be- 
coming gradually narrower upwards, and more acute. 
Petioles short, flattened on the upper side, and rounded 
below. Stipules linear, acute, fringed, green on both 
sides, generally more than twice the length of the peti- 
oles. Racemes terminal, several-flowered, noddiug be- 
fore the flowers expansion, becoming gradually erect as 
they expand. Bractes linearly lanceolate, acute, hairy, 
about the length of the pedicles, or sometimes not quite 
so long. Pedicles clothed with a woolly pubescence, 
nodding in the bud state, and becoming erect as the 

2 b 2 



flowers expand. Calyx of 5 sepals : the two outer ones 
very small, green, and hairy: the three inner ones, 
ovate, blunt, concave inwards, membranaceous, strongly 
3 or 4-nerved, smooth and glossy, the nerves slightly 
hairy. Flowers very double or fall of petals, that are un- 
equal in size and form, of a pale straw-colour, marked 
with orange at the base, and more or less veined with 
green. 

Our drawing of this pretty double variety was made 
from a plant at the Nursery of Mr. Lee, at Hammer- 
smith ; it is not so strong a grower as the single variety, 
but makes a very pretty plant for a pot, or for the orna- 
menting of rock-work, thriving well in a light sandy 
soil, mixed with a proportion of peat; and when covered 
with its pretty double flowers, it makes an elegant appear- 
ance, particularly when intermixed with some of the 
brighter flowered and more brilliant species ; it is not 
quite so hardy as some of the sorts, and some pots of it 
should be preserved in frames through the Winter ; or 
if planted in rock- work, should be covered in severe 
frost, by an empty pot being placed over each root, or 
a little hay or straw, or some other covering, when it 
will succeed very well : young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses in August or September, soon strike root. 



<«*.■.■ 



37 



HELIANTHEMUM sulphureum. 
Sulphur-coloured Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. EuhblIanthemum. Supra foil. 
** Petalu albis, roseis, rubris veldihUh tulpkureis. 



H. sulphureum, cautious ramosis procumbentibus scabriasctfHs to- 
mentosiusoulis subincanis, foliis lanceolatis planis supra viridibus 
subtus pallidioribus utrinque stellato-pubescentibus, stiputis foli- 
aceis angusto-lanceolatis acutis ciliatis petiolo tripio longioribus, 
racemo terminali paucifloro, calycibus mem bran ace is striatis gla- 
briusculis nitidis, petalis obovatrs crenulatis patentibus distinctis. 

Helianthemam sulphureum. Willden. enum. supp. 39. DC.prodr. 1. 
p. 383. «. 107. Spreng. sysf . veg. 2. p. 593. n. 90. Swt. hart. mb. 
land. p. 124. n. 41. Hort. brit. p. 36. n. 81. 



£/imi suffiruticose, procumbent, branching in all di- 
rections : branches rough, occasioned by little tubercles 
or warts, on which little fascicles of hairs have been 
seated, the upper part clothed with a thin loose tomen- 
tum. Leaves flat, opposite, petiolate, lanceolate, acute, 
or the lower ones obtuse, dark green on the upper side, 
and paler underneath, both sides clothed with fascicles 
of hairs, which are stellately spreading, margins rough 
and uneven. Petioles short, warted, flat on the upper 
side, and rounded on the lower. Stipules leaf-like, nar- 
rowly lanceolate, acute, ciliate, about 3 times longer 
than the footstalk of the leaf, green on both sides. 
Racemes terminal, few-flowered, nodding before the 
expansion of the flowers, then becomipg erect. Bractes 
lanceolate, acute, ciliate, rather more than half the 
length of the pedicles. Pedicles tomentose, nodding 
before expansion, erect when expanded, afterwards re- 
flexed. Calyx of 5 sepals; the two outer ones very 
small, narrowly lanceolate, oblique, acute, fringed, pur- 
ple at the base, the upper part green: inner ones nar- 
rowly ovate, acute, concave, membranaceous, strongly 

L 



4-nerved, glossy, the nerves slightly hairy. Petals 5, 
obovate, crenulate, generally notched at the point, 
widely spreading, distinct, or sometimes slightly over- 
lapping at the base, of a bright sulphur colour, yellower 
towards the base. Stamens above 50, shorter than the 
style. Oermen globular, downy. Style smooth, bent 
about the middle, much thickened below the stigma, 
and becoming gradually slenderer downwards. Stigma 
capitate, slightly 3-lobed, pustulose. 

This pretty little plant is a native of Spain, and is 
well adapted for the ornamenting of rock-work, when 
mixed with other species ; it will stand our mildest 
winters well without the least covering, but in very se- 
vere frosts it requires a little protection, either with a 
mat or some straw or fern, except there be a sufficient 
quantity of snow to protect it; plants of it may also be 
grown in pots in a light sandy soil, where they will 
thrive well, and produce an abundance of flowers; they 
can then be protected by being placed in a frame in se- 
vere weather; like the other species of this section, it 
succeeds well by cuttings, planted under hand-glasses 
in August or September, when they will soon strike 
root. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant at the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, last Summer. 



<ra 




60 

HELIANTHEMUM cupreum. 

Copper-coloured Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Euhklianthemum. Supra foLl. 
•* Fetalis albis, rosei*, rubris vel dilute sutphureis. 



H. cupreum, caule gufiratiooso procumbente; rami* adscendontibus 
tomentosiascuiis aduitis glabris, foliis oblongo-lanceolatis canali- 
culatis : supra viridibus hirsutis ; snbtus tomentoso-incauis, sti- 
pulis lanceolatis acutis ciliatis apice setosts petiolo duplo longi- 
oribus, oalycibus tomentoso-pilosis, petalis imbricatia. 



Stem suffruticose, procumbent, branching in all di- 
rections : branches ascending, purple, when young clo- 
thed with a thin tomentum, which wears off by age, 
they then become smooth and glossy, but are thinly 
warted. Leaves oblongly-lanceolate, scarcely acute, 
rather concave and channelled on the upper side, which 
is green and hairy ; underneath clothed with a close 
dense white tomentum, the margins slightly rolled 
back : upper leaves narrowest and more acute. Peti- 
oles short, pubescent. Stipules lanceolate, acute, about 
twice the length of the petioles, fringed with long hairs, 
the ends of which bend inwards, the points setose, or 
tipped with little bristle-like hairs. Racemes terminal, 
several-flowered, nodding before expansion, afterwards 
becoming erect. Bractes lanceolate, fringed, more than 
half the length of the pedicles, sometimes full the 
length. Pedicles downy, nodding before the expansion 
of the flowers, erect when in bloom, afterwards re- 
flexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, the two outer ones very 
small, oblong, obtuse, hairy, the three inner ones ovate, 
scarcely acute, concave, strongly 3 or 4-nerved, very 
hairy on the nerves, the hairs in bunches, which are 

s2 



seated on small tubercles or warts, margins and be- 
tween the nerves membranaceous and tomentose. Pe- 
tals 5, a little longer than the calyx, broader than long, 
rounded, very much imbricate, of a dark copper co- 
lour, with a darker mark at the base. Stamens from 
50 to 60 : filaments smooth, bright yellow, longer than 
the style. Germen tomentose. Style smooth, a little 
bent, and very slender at the base, thickening upwards. 
Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing of this plant was made at the Nursery 
of Mr. J. Lee, at Hammersmith, last Summer ; it is- 
most probably a hybrid production, as its leaves are 
very frequently variegated ; it makes a very pretty 

Slant for the adorning of rock-work, where it will 
ower the greater part of the Summer ; or it will thrive 
well in small pots, in a mixture of light sandy loam 
and peat, when it will require a little protection in 
Winter, either in frames, or to be covered with a mat 
in frosty weather. Cuttings root freely, planted under 
hand-glasses, in Autumn. 



ft 




sS 



101 



HELIANTHEMUM MiUeri. 

Mr. Millers Sun-Rase. 



Sect. IX. Euhblianthemum. SuprafoL 7. 
** Fetalis aibis, roseis, rubris vel dilute sulphureis. 



H. MiUeri, oaule suffiruticoso procumbente, ramis hirsuto-tomentosts, 
foliis oblongis obtusiusculis planis utrinque viridibus hirsutis, sti- 
pulis falcatis petiolo longioribus, calycibus hirsutis, petalis imbri- 
cstis. 



Stem suffrutescent, procumbent: branches also pro- 
cumbent, thickly clothed with short soft woolly hairs 
and soft down underneath, the points asceuding a little. 
Leaves opposite, flat, dull green on both sides, thickly 
covered on both sides with stiffish hairs which are ge- 
nerally in pairs: lower ones of a roundish oval, quite 
obtuse: the upper ones longer, oblong, or oblongly 
lanceolate, more acute. Petioles thickly clothed with 
woolly hairs, scarcely so long as the stipules, flattened 
on the upper side, and rounded underneath. Stipules 
somewhat falcate, linear or lanceolately linear, hairy 
and fringed : lower ones very small, scarcely longer 
than the petioles, the upper ones very long, about twice 
the length of the petioles. Racemes terminal, many- 
flowered, nodding before expansion, and becoming 
erect as the flowers expand. Bractes similar to the sti- 
pules. Pedicles clothed with a short tomentum, nodding 
before the expansion of the flowers, erect when in bloom, 
afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals; the two outer 
ones small, linear, obtuse : the three inner ones ovate, 
concave, acute, strongly 3 or 4-nerved, membranaceous 

2 D 



between the nerves, which are thickly clothed with 
bristle-like hairs. Petals 5, imbricate, obcordate, more 
or less crumpled, uneven at the ends, of a saffron co- 
lour, with a dark copper-coloured spot at the base of 
each, which makes a circle of that colour at the base of 
the flower. Stamens numerous, unequal in length : ^la- 
ments smooth, pale yellow. Germen densely tomentose. 
Style smooth, somewhat bent at the base, where it is 
very slender, club-shaped upwards. Stigma capitate, 
papillose. 

The present plant is nearest related to H. hyssopifo- 
tium> from which it differs in its trailing prostrate stems, 
dull green and rough, not glossy smooth leaves, which 
are also much more hairy, and they have quite a differ- 
ent appearance when seen growing together ; it is also 
related to H. nummularium ; but that is a much more 
branching plant, with yellow loose-petaled flowers ; it 
may probably be a hybrid production between the two. 

The plant from which our drawing was made, was 
sent to us by Mr. J. Miller, of the Bristol Nursery, 
with several other sorts that are not common in the 
neighbourhood of London ; it makes a very desirable 

Elant for the ornamenting of rock-work, its flowers 
eing so different in colour from most others, thriving 
well in a light sandy soil ; it also makes a handsome 
appearance grown in small pots, in a mixture of sandy 
loam and peat, and will continue to bloom in succes- 
sion all the Summer, and till late in Autumn, the young 
shoots as they are produced being generally terminated 
by a raceme of flowers ; it is quite hardy, having stood 
the whole of last Winter in the open border of our gar- 
den without the least protection. Cuttings, taken off 
in the young wood, and planted under hand-glasses, in 
July or August, will strike root in a few days. 



<7 



91. 




JJL***. 



AJfrSKifwrn MmA UN 



'/, 



92 



HELI AIVTHEMUM hyssapifolium m cnocatwn. 
Saffron-coloured Hyssop-leaved Sun-Rose. 



8**. IX. BUHELIAKTaBMUM. SuprmJbLl* 

** Petatk *Urih rateu 9 rubrisvel dilute ndpkureii. 



H. kustopiffilium, caule suftraticoso adscendente, ramis huiuto-io- 
jnentosiusculis, foliis inferioribn* ovalibus ; superioribus oblongo- 
lanceolatis ; utrinque viridibus planis birsutis, calycibus hirsutis, 
petalis imbricatis. Supra fol. 58. cum synonym. 

m crocatum, floribus ferrugineo-crocew. Supra 92. 

$ eupreum, floribus cupreis. Supra fol. 68. 

y. multiplex, fioribu* cupreia plenia. Supra fol. 72. 



Stem suffrutescent, much branched : branches ascend* 
ing, tomentosely hairy, becoming nearly smooth by age. 
Leaves opposite, flat, green on both sides, the upper 
side glossy, hairy on both sides, the hairs curved in- 
wards, varying in size and shape, according to the 
strength of the plant : lower ones nearly round, or of 
a roundish oval, others oblong, oblongly ovate, or the 
upper ones lanceolate and more acute. Petioles short, 
flattened on the upper side, hairy. Stipules lanceolate, 
acute, hairy and fringed, bristle-pointed, about twice 
the length of the petioles. Racemes terminal, many- 
flowered, nodding before expansion, and becoming 
erect as the flowers expand. Bractes lanceolate, acute, 
hairy, and fringed, shorter than the pedicles. Pedicles 
downy, nodding before the flowers expansion, erect 
when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
very hairy, the two outer ones small ; inner ones ovate, 
acute, concave inwards, strongly nerved, the nerves 
tinged with red or purple. Petals 5, imbricate, very 



broad and rounded, or sometimes a little hollow at the 
points, or obcordate, of a saffron colour, more or less 
tinged with a ferruginous tint. Stamens numerous, 
unequal in length : Ifilaments smooth, yellow. Germen 
silky. Style about the length of the stamens, nearly 
straight, or very little bent at the base, slender at the 
base, and thickening upwards. Stigma capitate, pa- 
pillose. 

Our drawing of this handsome variety was taken 
from a plant at the Nursery of Mr. J. Mackay, at 
Clapton, where it was grown with numerous other 
species and varieties, in a border at the front of his 
Greenhouses ; in our opinion, it is a more beautiful 
variety than the copper-coloured one, and is a delight- 
ful plant for ornamenting rock-work, or to be grown 
in a dry border, thriving well in a light sandy soil, or 
if grown in pots, an equal portion of sandy loam and 
peat will suit it well ; it is pretty hardy, but it will be 
best to give it a slight covering m severe frost. Young 
cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in Autumn, strike 
root readily. 

We have this Winter tried a great many species of 
Cistus in various situations in the open ground, and 
have found them succeed best, and suffer the least 
from frost, in a border with a north-west aspect; 
scarcely any of them were injured in the least, though 
several were of the tenderer sorts, and they had not the 
least covering or protection ; we attribute this to their 
being in a more dormant state, and their wood there- 
fore more hardened to withstand the frost ; as those in 
a southern aspect, though partially covered, were hurt 
much worse, which we account for by their being more 
in a growing state. 



*r 



58 



HELIANTHEMUM hyssopifolium p cupreum. 
Copper-coloured Hyssop-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra fol. 7. 
•* Fetalis albit, roseu, rubris vel dilute sulpkureti. 



H. kysiopifolium, caule suffruticoso adscendente, ramis birsnto-to- 
mentosiusculis, foliis inferioribus ovalibus ; superioribus oblongo- 
lanceolatis ; utrinque Tiridibus planis hirsutis, caljcibua hirsutis, 
petalis imbricatis. 

Heliantbemum byssopifolium. Ten. synop$.Jlor. neap. p. 4Q. DC. 
prodr. l.p.284. 

a crocatum, floribus ferrugineo-croceis. 

ff cupreum, floribus cupreis. Supra. 

y multiplex, floribus cupreis plenis. 



Stem suffruticose, much branched : branches ascend- 
ing, when young densely tomentosely hairy, becoming 
nearly smooth by age, when they are more or less tin- 
ged with purple. Leaves flat, green on both sides, the 
upper side glossy, hairy on both sides, the hairs curved 
inwards, varying in size according to the strength of the 
plant : lower ones roundly oval, upper ones narrower, 
oblongly lanceolate or linearly lanceolate. Petioles 
short, pubescent, slightly furrowed on the upper side, 
and rounded on the lower. Stipules lanceolate, acute, 
hairy and bristle- pointed, about double the length of the 
petioles. Racemes terminal, nodding before expansion, 
becoming erect when in bloom. Bractes lanceolate, 
acute, pubescent, shorter than the stipules. Pedicles 
downy, nodding before the flowers expansion, erect 
when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
very hairy, bearded at the base, the two outer ones very 
small, lanceolate, acute, erect : inner ones ovate, acute, 
concave, strongly nerved. Petals 5, broadly obovate or 

q2 



obcordate, very much imbricate, of a reddish copper 
colour. Stamens about 100, unequal in length : fila- 
ments smooth, pale yellow. Germen silky. Style about 
the length of the stamens, nearly straight, slender at 
the base, and thickening upwards. Stigma capitate. 

We believe the present very distinct plant belongs to 
H. hyssofnfolium of Tenore, as it agrees precisely with 
his description ; we are acquainted with two other very 
distinct varieties of it, one with flowers of a lighter 
colour, the other with double flowers ; it is one of the 
strongest growing species of this section, and is a very 
desirable plant for adorning rock-work, where it makes 
a grand appearance when covered with its large bright 
flowers, succeeding well in a light sandy soil; and 
young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in August 
or September, will strike root readily. 

Our drawing was made from a plant at the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne! at Fulham. 



*9 



i* 



i 




<? 



72 



HELIANTHEMUM hyssopifolium 7 mt«to>fer. 
Double-flowered Hyssop-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foL 7, 

** Petalis albis, roseis, mbris vel dilute sulphureis. 



H. hyssopifolium, caule suflruticoso adscendente, ramis hirsuto-to- 
mentoaioscolis, foliis inferioribus ovalibus; saperioribas oblongo- 
lanceolatis; utrinque viridibua planis hirsutis, cal^cibua hirsutis, 
petalis imbricatis. Supra foL 68. 

y multiplex, floribns cupreis plenis. 



Stem suffruticose, much branched; branches as- 
cending, very much knotted or rugged, when young 
tomentosely hairy, but this wears off by age. Leaves 
flat, very hairy, shorter and smaller than in the single 
varieties : lower ones ovate, bluntish ; upper ones nar- 
rower, oblongly lanceolate, acute, dark green on the 
upper side and paler underneath. Petioles short, pu- 
bescent. Stipules about half the length of the leaves, 
lanceolate, acute, very hairy, fringed and bristle-pointed. 
Racemes terminal, many-flowered, nodding before ex- 
pansion, afterwards becoming erect. Bractes lanceo- 
late, acute, very hairy, shorter than the stipules. Pe- 
dicles downy, nodding before the flowers expansion, 
erect or spreading when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. 
Calyx of 5 sepals, very hairy, the two outer ones very 
small, lanceolate, acute ; inner ones ovate, acute, con- 
cave, strongly nerved. Flowers more or less double or 
full of petals, copper-coloured, darkest at the base, some- 
times making an attempt at another flower in its centre. 
Stamens, many perfect, others are changed into petals. 
Germen and Style generally monstrous. 



Our drawing of this plant was made at the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham. It 
makes a pretty plant for the adorning of rock- work, 
producing its fine double flowers, the greater part of the 
Summer. It may also be grown in small pots, in a 
mixture of sandy loam and peat; the plants can then 
be protected by mats, or placed in frames in severe 
frost. A collection of the different species and varieties 
of this handsome genus, grown in pots, and placed to- 
gether, in a clump, make a splendid appearance, when 
in flower, in the Summer ; we scarcely know any tribe 
of plants that make so gay a show when in bloom ; and 
though the flowers continue but a short time, still the 
succession that follows, makes that of little or no con- 
sequence. The present plant is readily increased, by 
planting young cuttings under hand-glasses, in August, 
but the glasses must be removed from them as soon as 
rooted, or they will be liable to damp. 



<J0 




^ 



106 



HELIANTHEMUM mutabile p roseum. 
Rose-coloured changeable Sun-Rose. 

8ect. IX. Euhblianth*mum. Supra fol 7. 
•• Petati* albu, nmu t rubru vel dibit*! tulpkureis. 



H. mmtahiie, caule sulrruticoeo, minis prpcumbentibus tomentosius- 
cutis, foliis plank ovato-oblongis acutiusculis supra glabris subtus 
levissimfe tomentosis jmllidfe einereis, stipulis pilosiusculis petiolo 
subaequalibus vel longioribus, calycibus striatis glabriusculis. DC. 
prodr. 1. p. 283. 

Helianthemum mutabile. Pen. sun. 2. p. 79. WiUd.emum.2. p. 571. 
£t»A. 6Mm. 2. p. 77. Spreug. *yrf. 2. p. 674. &u>*. for*, brit. p. 36. 

Cistus mutabilis. Jacq. ic. 1. *. 99. Misc. 2. p. 340. 

• album, floribus albis. 

0ro$eum 9 floribus roseo-rubris minoribus. Supra. 



Stem suffruticose, much branched : branches procum- 
bent, spreading round in all directions, clothed with a 
thin tomentum. Leaves opposite, flat, ovately oblong, 
scarcely acute, the lower ones roundest and bluntest, 
the upper side green and glossy, rough, the roughness 
occasioned by minute tubercles on which the hairs are 
seated : underneath clothed with a thin grey tomentum. 
Petioles short, hairy. Stipules narrowly lanceolate, acute, 
fringed with longish hairs, lower ones about the length 
of the petioles, the upper ones about double the length. 
Racemes terminal, several-flowered, nodding before ex- 
pansion, afterwards becoming erect. Bractes lanceolate, 
fringed with long hairs. Pedicles clothed with a thin 
tomentum, nodding before the flowers expansion, erect 
when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
the two outer ones very small, oblong, obtuse, spread- 
ing, thickly clothed with long hairs : the three inner 



ones ovate, concave, scarcely acute, membranaceous, 
glossy, strongly 4 or 5-nerved, the nerves hairy. Pe- 
tals b y broadly obovate, distinct or slightly imbricate, 
pale rose-colour, yellow at the base, dying off nearly 
white. Stamens numerous, about 80 : filaments long, 
bright yellow : pollen golden yellow. Germen clothed 
with a short dense tomentum. Style smooth, about the 
length of the Stamens, nearly straight or slightly bent 
at the base, thickening upwards. Stigma capitate, pa- 
pillose. 

Our drawing of the present pretty plant was taken 
at the Nursery of Mr. J. Mackay, at Clapton, where it 
was grown with a fine collection of other species, in a 
border at the front of the Greenhouses, and made a 
splendid appearance, when all were covered with bloom* 

The present species is a native of Spain, and endures 
our Winters well in the open ground, except when they 
are very severe, thriving well in rock-work, or on a dry 
bank, and producing its flowers all the Summer and 
till late in Autumn; the flowers are very variable in 
colour, at first bright rose, then changing to a dull 
lilac or flesh colour, and at length becoming pale blush, 
which gives the plant a singular appearance : if the 
Winters are at any time unusually severe, it will be 
best to protect it a little with some slight covering, or 
if some plants are kept in small pots in frames through 
the Winter, they will be ready to turn out where they 
may be wanted in Spring ; a light sandy soil suits it 
best ; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses 
the latter end of Summer or Autumn, will root readily. 



<?/ 




J/ 

55 

HELIANTHEMUM roseum. 
Rose-coloured Sun-Ro$e. 



Sect IX. Euhblianthbmum. Supra foL 7. 
** Petalis albis, roseu, rubru vel dilute tulphureis. 



H. roseum, caule snffmtiooso decumbente, ramis inferioribus glabris 
nitidis superioribus tomentoso-incanis, foliis rotundato-ovatis ova- 
to-lanceofatis sea lanceolate- oblongis obtusis margine revolutis 
subtus tomentoso-incanis supra viridibus nitidis snonirsntis, sti- 
pnlis lanceolato-linearibns cuiatis apice setosis petiolo dnplo Ion* 
gioribns, calycibus membranaeeis glabris ant angnlis snbpilosis, 
petalis basi imbrieatis. 

Helianthemnm roseum. DC. prodr. I. p. 283. Swt.hort.brit.p.dS. 

Cistns rosens. Allien. JL ped. 2. p. 106. t. 45. f. 4. no* Jacquini. 



Stem 8uffruticose, decumbent, spreading in all direc- 
tions : branches ascending, smooth and glossy on the 
lower part, of a purple colour, the upper part clothed 
more or less with a white tomentum. Leaves opposite, 
petiolate, variable, obtuse, with revolute margins, un- 
derneath clothed with a dense white tomentum, the up- 
per side green and glossy, but slightly hairy, the hairs 
forked, or two proceeding from one base, pointing in dif- 
ferent directions : lower leaves roundly ovate, others 
ovately lanceolate, the upper ones lanceolately oblong. 
Petioles about half the length of the stipules, flattened 
and furrowed on the upper side, and rounded on the 
lower. Stipules larger than usual, lanceolately linear, 
fringed, the points setose. Racemes terminal, many flow- 
ered, nodding before expansion, afterwards erect. Brae- 
tes lanceolate, ciliate, the points setose. Pedicles clothed 
with a short canescent tomentum, nodding before the 
flowers expand, erect when in bloom, afterwards reflex- 
ed. Calyx of 5 sepals ; the two outer ones very short, el- 
liptical, fringed : inner ones membranaceous, smooth, 



ovate, concave, obtuse, with 3 prominent, more or less 
purple nerves, which are slightly hairy, with a few hairs 
also at the points. Petals 5, roundly obcordaie, slightly 
crumpled, imbricate, of a pale rose colour, with an 
orange-coloured spot at the base. Stamens from 65 to 70, 
about the length of the style : filaments smooth, bright 
yellow : pollen yellow. Oermen sericeous. Style smooth, 
slender and bent at the base, and thickening upwards. 
Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant at the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham. It 
is a native of the South of Europe, and requires a slight 
covering in severe frosty weather, but will endure our 
mildest Winters in the open air without the least pro- 
tection. It thrives well in a light sandy soil, or an equal 
mixture of light sandy loam and peat will suit it very 
well. It makes a very pretty plant amongst others for 
the adorning of rock-work, where it will produce an 
abundance of flowers nearly all the Summer ; it may 
also be grown in small pots, which can be protected from 
the severe frost Young cuttings, planted under hand- 
glasses* from July to September, will strike root readily. 



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86 



HELIANTHEMUM roseum 0. multiplex. 
Double-jlowered Rose-coloured Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foil. 
** Petalu albis, roseis, rnbrit vel dilutt sutphurtis. 



H. roseum, caule suffruticoso subprocumbente tomentosiusculo, foliis 
ovato-Ianceolatb utrinque tomentosiusculis: subtus pallide cinereis, 
stipulis linearibus, pedicellis calycibusque piloso-subhirsutis. DC. 
prodr.l.p.283. 

Helianthemum roseum. DC.flar.fr. 4. p. 822. Supra foL 55. 

0. multiplex, foliis latioribus obtusioribus, floribus plenis. Supra. 



Stems suffruticose, branching, more or less procum- 
bent, ascending, the young branches tomentose. Leaves 
opposite or in threes, ovate or ovately lanceolate, 
bluntly rounded, the upper ones more acute, clothed 
with a short tomentum on both sides, the upper side 
of a greyish hoary colour, underneath more canescent, 
the margins slightly revolute when young, but becom- 
ing flat by age. Petioles short, tomentosely hairy. Sti- 
pules linear, acute, tomentosely hairy, and terminated 
with a tuft of shortish hairs. Racemes terminal, many- 
flowered, nodding before expansion, afterwards length- 
ening out and becoming erect. Bractes short, lanceo- 
late. Pedicles clothed with a short canescent tomentum, 
nodding. Calyx inflated, roundly ovate, tomentose, 
of 5 sepals : 2 outer ones very small, close pressed to 
the others: inner ones ovate, bluntish, concave in- 
wards, strongly 4- nerved. Flowers monstrous, more 
or less double, pale rose coloured ; when grown in rich 
soil very large, consisting of many petals. Stamens 
perfect, and numerous in most flowers. Style and 
Stigma sometimes perfect, but often imperfect. 

z2 



This pretty doable variety is well worth cultivating, 
and thrives well in rock-work, or planted in the bor- 
der of the flower-garden, if in a light soil, and not too 
moist ; it then grows very strctalg, ahd attains a good 
size, making a large bushy tuft ; its flowers are also 
then very large, much larger than those in our figure, 
which was taken from a plant grown in a pot ; it is 

Suite hardy, and continues to bloom nearly all the 
ummer: young cuttings, planted underhand-glasses 
in August or September, strike root readily. 

Our drawing was made from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill ; we also received it from the Nursery 
of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham. 



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96 



HELIANTHEMUM diversifoUum. 

Different-leaved Sun-Rase. 



Sect: IX. Euhblianthemum. Supra foL 7. 
** PetaliBaUri$,roseis,rtdni$vel dilute sulphureii. 



H. divenifolium, caule suffruticoso adscendente ramoso: rami* 
tomentosiusculis erecto-adscendentibus, foliis petiolatis supra viri- 
dibus hirsutis subtus tomentoso-incanis : inferioribus ovalibus ob- 
longisve obtusis planis : superioribus lineari-lanceolatis acutu 
margine revolutis, stipulis lato-lanceolatis ciliatis petiolo 2-3-plo 
longioribus, sepalis pilosis, petalis crenulatis distinctis. 



Stem suffruticose, rough and rugged, much branched, 
ascending : branches erect or ascending, when young 
clothed with a thin close-pressed white tomentum, 
which wears off, and they then become smooth and 
glossy, and are more or less purple. Leaves opposite, 
very variable, petiolate, green on the upper side, and 
thickly clothed with short stiff hairs: underneath clo- 
thed with a dense white tomentum : lower ones oval, 
flat, obtuse, others oblong or oblongly lanceolate, the 
upper ones linearly lanceolate, acute, their margins re* 
volute. Petioles short. Stipules large, broadly lanceolate, 
scarcely acute, ciliated with long hairs, two or three 
times longer than the petioles. Racemes terminal, very 
long, many-flowered, nodding before the expansion of 
the flowers, afterwards becoming erect. Bractes lanceo- 
late, fringed with long hairs, almost as long as the pe- 
dicles. Pedicles densely tomentose, at first nodding, 
erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 se- 
pals, clothed with long spreading hispid hairs, the two 
outer ones very small, ovately oblong, bluntish, fringed, 
the inner ones ovate, concave, acute, strongly nerved, 



membranaceous between the nerves. Petals 5, distinctly 
spreading, obovate, narrow towards the base, the points 
notched or crenulate, dark flesh-coloured, with a large 
copper coloured mark near the base. Stamens numerous, 
about 70 : filaments straw-coloured : anthers and pollen 
golden yellow. Germen tomentose. Style smooth, twist- 
ed, and slender near the base, thickening upwards. 
Stigma capitate, papillose. 

The present is a very handsome and showy plant 
when covered with its brilliant flowers ; it belongs to 
the same tribe as H.potifotium, to which it is nearly re- 
lated, but is readily known at all times by the green 
upper side of the leaves ; those are vei*y variable in form 
and size, some being nearly round or oval, and obtuse, 
varying to lanceolate or linear, and more or less acute; 
the petals are nearly of the same form as H. polifolium, 
and are also notched at the points, but they are of a 
very different colour : it makes a desirable plant for the 
ornamenting of rock-work, or to be grown in small 
pots, succeeding best in a light sandy soil, and is co- 
vered with bloom the greater part of the Summer and 
till late in Autumn; young cuttings, planted under 
hand-glasses, the latter end of Summer or Autumn, 
strike root freely. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. Lee, at Hammersmith, from whose collection we 
have also obtained a drawing of a double variety of it. 



J?-* 




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98 



HELIANTHEMUM diversifolium p multiplex. 
Double-Jlowered different-leaved Sun- Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra fol. 7. 
** PetaHs altris, roseis, rubris vel dilute sulphureis. 



H. diversifoliuf*, caule suffruticoso adscendente ramoso: ramis to- 
mentosiusculis erecto-adscendentibus, foliis petiolatis supra viridi- 
bus hirsutis subtus tomentoso incanis: inferioribus ovalibus oblon- 
gisve obtusis planis: superioribus lineari-lanceolatis acutis margine 
revolutis, stipulis lato lanceolatis ciliatis petiolo 2-3-plo longiori- 
bus, sepalis pilosis, petalis crenulatis distinctis. Nobis in supra 
fol 95. 

a rimplicjflora, foliis minoribus, floribus simplicibus. Supra 95. 

fl multiplex, foliis majoribus, petalis multiplicibus. Supra 98. 

Lady Gardner's variety. Hortulanorum. 



Stem suffruticose, rough, hairy, branched, trailing : 
branches ascending or erect, when young clothed with 
a close-pressed white tomentum, and longer hairs in- 
termixed. Leaves opposite, variable, petiolate, hairy, 
green on the upper side: underneath clothed with a 
short white dense tomentum, flat, or the margins slightly 
revolute: lower ones oval or nearly round, obtuse, 
others oblongly ovate, or oblongly lanceolate, some of 
the upper ones being nearly linear, acute. Petioles short, 
very hairy. Stipules lanceolate, longer than the petioles, 
bluntish or scarcely acute, very hairy and fringed. Ra- 
cemes terminal, many-flowered, nodding before the flow- 
ers expand, then becoming erect. Bractes lanceolate, 
hairy and fringed, acute, at first erect, or the point bent 
a little inwards, after the flower is expanded they be- 
come reflexed or slightly revolute at the point. Pedicles 
densely clothed with a short tomentum, nodding before 

2c2 



the flowers expansion, then becoming erect or nearly 
so, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, very hairy; 
the two outer ones very small, linear, obtuse: the three 
inner ones ovate, concave, scarcely acute, strongly ner- 
ved, membranaceous between the nerves. Flowers double, 
of a dark purplish red, consisting of many petals: outer 
petals 5 or 6, obcordate, surrounding the inner ones, 
that are smaller, and of various forms, and of a lighter 
purple. Stamens numerous, intermixed with the small 
petals. Ovarium and Style generally imperfect, their 
place frequently supplied by small sepal-like leafy ap- 
pendages. 

Our drawing of this handsome double variety was 
made from a plant at the Nursery of Mr. J. Lee, at 
Hammersmith, whore it is cultivated under the name 
of Lady Gardner's variety: it is a handsome plant for 
the decorating of rock-work, or to be grown in a small 
pot, and will continue to flower nearly all the Summer, 
growing freely in any light sandy soil ; and young cut- 
tings, planted under hand-glasses in August, strike root 
readily, and soon make nice young plants; some of 
them should be preserved in frames through the Winter, 
as they are sometimes injured by severe frost. 



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10 



HELIANTHEMUM venustum. 
Charming Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. EdhelianthSmum. Supra, fot< 7. 
•• Fetalis aBris, ro$eU, rubri* vet dihUe iulpkureis. 



H. venvthm, caide snffrnticoao adtcendente ramoso ; rami* glabrji 
verrucosis apice subtomentosis, foliis obloDgo-lanceolatts aoatis 
planis ant margine vix revolutis dentioalato-acabris aubta* tomen- 
toso-incanis supra viridibus nitidis, stipnlis lanceolatis ciliato-hir- 
sutis petiolo duplo longioribus, sepalis internis membranaceis : 
nerris verrucosis hirsutis, petalis vawc imbricatis. 

HeUanthemum vemutam* Swt. hart. brit. p. 86. «. 78. 
Q.Jlort plena. 



Stem suffruticose, ascending, much branched: 
branches spreading in all directions, ascending, gene- 
rally purple, smooth and glossy, more or less waited 
with small brown warts, upper part slightly tomentose. 
Leaves oblongly-lanceolate, acute, some of them flat, 
others with the margins slightly revolute, rough, or 
toothed with very small teeth, fringed with short hairs, 
underneath clothed with a close white tomentum, the 
upper side green and glossy, but clothed with fascicles 
of short stellate hairs. Petioles short, flattened on the 
upper side, and rounded on the lower, about half the 
length of the stipules. Stipules lanceolate, fosciculately 
hairy and ciliate, the points setose. Racemes terminal, 
several flowered, nodding before expansion, afterwards 
erect. Bractes lanceolate, fasciculately hairy and 
fringed. Pedicles short and slender, slightly tomentose, 
nodding before the flowers expand, erect when in 
flower, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals: the 
2 outer ones small, elliptically lanceolate, bluntish, 
keeled, hairy and fringed, the keel warted ; inner ones 
ovate, concave, acute, membranaceous, strongly 4- 

j>2 



nerved, the nerves waited with purple warts, and fasci- 
culately hairy. Petal* 5, nearly orbicular, very broad, 
more or less crumpled, very much imbricate, of a 
bright crimson inclining to orange, and a yellow spot 
at the base. Stamens about 70, half the length of the 
style : filaments slender, straw-coloured : pollen yellow. 
Germen densely tomentose. Style long, slender, and 
crooked at the base, and thickening upwards. Stigma 
capitate, papillose. 

This very prettv plant is now very common in the 
collections about London, but we cannot find any de- 
scription agree with it in any of the works that we have 
examined ; it is readily distinguished from H. rhodcm- 
thum by its waited stalks and calyces, and by its 
smooth and shining stems ; its habit is also very differ- 
ent ; it is one of the most ornamental plants of the 
genus for adorning rock- work, as it is quite hardy, and 
continues to flower all the summer, and till late in 
autumn ; it will also succeed well on a dry bank, or in 
any common border of the flower garden where it does 
not get too much moisture ; in some of our collections 
it is considered as a variety of H. vnlgare, but it has 
certainly nothing to do with that species, from which 
it differs more than from any other species in the sec- 
tion; we believe many species have been confused 
together by the short descriptions that have been given 
of them, and those chiefly from dry specimens that 
have dropt their petals. Specimens of this natural 
order of plants should always be gathered in the morn- 
ing, as soon as the flowers expand, and before their 
anthers are burst, for as soon as that takes place, the 
stigma becomes fertilized by the pollen," and the petals 
will not remain long after. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant, at the Nursery 
of Mr. Colvill, where it is cultivated in pots of light 
sandy soil, and makes a splendid appearance all the 
summer; young cuttings root freely under hand- 
glasses in the open ground, if planted in autumn. 



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ys 



HELIANTHEMUM rhodanthum. 
Dark rose-coloured Sun-rose. 



Sect IX. Edhelianthemum. Calyx ante anthesin apice snb- 
tortus, 5-sepalus, sepalis externis s©pe patulia multo minoribus, 
internis 2 ssepius 4-costatis sulcatis margine scariosis intils nitidis, 
angiitis seepe pilosis. Petala calycibus 2-3-4-plo longiora. Sta- 
mina numerosa. Stylus basi flexus, apice subclaratus. Stigma 
simplex. Capsula ealyce obtecta trivalvis unilocularis apice dehis- 
tens. Semina pauoa extus convexa, intus angulosa. — Saffrutioes; 
caules ban ramosi, rami* numerosis erectU vel procumbentibus, 
sapius adscendentibus. Folia opposita, breviter petiolata, inferior a 
minora, scept margine revohUa stipulata, stipulis linearilanceolatis. 
Racemi terminates secundi simplices, ante anthesin ineurvi, past 
anthesin erecti elongati. PedicelH basi lateraliter bracteati, ante 
anthesin cernui, per anthesin erecti, post anthesin recurvi refiexi. 
DC. prodr. 1. p. 278. 

•• Fetalis attris, roseis, rubris vel dilute* sulphureis. 



H. rhodanthum, caule auffiruticoso prooumbente ; rami* tomentosi- 
UBcalis subinoanis adscendentibns, foliis oblongis margine revo- 
lutis; subtus tomentoso-incanis ; suprft. viridi-glaucescentibus, 
stipulis subvlatis pilosis apice setosis, calycibus breviter tomen- 
to6is albidis, petalis imbricatis. 

Helianthemum rhodanthum. DunaL inea\ ex DC. prodr. 1. p. 282. 
Swt. hart. brit. p. 36. ». 76. 



Stems numerous, procumbent, very much branched: 
branches ascending, densely clothed with a short white 
mealy tomentum, that wears off by age. Leaves oppo- 
site, crossing each other, with short footstalks, oblong 
or oblongly linear, bluntish, but terminated in a point, 
margins revolute, of a glaucous green, and slightly 
pubescent on the upper side ; and clothed with a dense 
white tomentum on the lower. Petioles short, canes- 
cently pubescent. Stipules, one on each side of the 
leaf, longer than the petioles, subulate, hairy, with 
bristly points. Racemes terminal, several flowered, 
before flowering curved inwards, after flowering, elon- 
gated and erect. Bractes short, acute, canescent. 



Peduncles thickly clothed with a white pubescence, 
and some longer hairs intermixed, before flowering 
cernuoos, when in flower erect, after flowering re- 
curved. Sepals 5, clothed with a short white tomen- 
tum ; 2 outer ones very small, ovately- lanceolate, hairy ; 
inner ones ovate, concave, bluntish, membranaceous, 
strongly 4-ribbed, the ribs more or less hairy. Petals 5, 
more than double the length of the calyx, very much 
imbricate, rounded, more or less crumpled, of a bright 
red inclining to crimson, with an orangy tint near the 
base. Stamens numerous, scarcely as long as the style, 
from 70 to 80 : filaments slender, smooth, bright yel- 
low ; pollen yellow. Germen clothed with dense wool. 
Style smooth, bent like a bow near the base, the upper 
part thicker and erect. Stigma capitate. 

This very handsome flowering plant is a native of 
Spain, and is one of the most ornamental species for 
the adorning of rock- work : it is also quite hardy, our 
drawing being taken from a fine plant, growing lux- 
uriantly with many other handsome species, in the 
rock- work of the garden belonging to the Apotheca- 
ries' Company, at Chelsea, in June last; nothing 
could make a more brilliant appearance, than the va- 
rious species of different habits, with flowers of various 
colours with which the plants were decked every day 
for about two months ; it also makes a handsome ap- 
pearance when grown in pots, in which it will thrive 
very well, or on a dry bank in the garden ; nothing is 
more injurious to this family of plants, than too moist 
a situation in Winter ; like most of the species of this 
genus, the present plant grows freely in a mixture of 
sandy loam and peat, or any light sandy soil; and 
young cuttings root readily, if planted under hand- 
glasses, in a shady situation. 



47 




51 



HELTAIf ITOSMUM canescens. 
Canescent Sun-Rose. 

— • ' tt ; 

Sect. IX. EtJHfcLjANTHBMUK. Svpr*/**- ?• 

•* Pctalis albu, ro$ei$, rubris vel ditutS sulpkureu. 



H. cane$cens 9 caul© suffruticoso ramoso diffuso : raims adscefideB- 
tibua tomentoainsculis canescentibtis, foliis planis ant margin* vix 
revolutis tabtua tomentoso-incanis supra viridi-glauoeacetitibua : 
inferioribus ovsto-oblongis obtnais : superioribus laaceolatia tes- 
tis, stipulis linearibus ciliatia petiolo sublongioribus, ealjcibna 
gjtabriusoulis nervfo pubesceDtibus, petalis valdo imbricatis. 

Helianthefflum eanescens. Swt. hart brit. p. 36. ft. 75. 



Stem suflruticose, branching in all directions : bran- 
ches procumbent, their points ascending, thickly clothed 
with a close pressed canescent tomentum. Leaves op- 
posite, variable, flat or sometimes very slightly revolute 
at the margins, underneath clothed with a dense white 
tomentUm, the upper side of a dull glaucous green, oc- 
casioned by a short close pressed pubescence, scarcely 
perceptible to the naked eye : lower ones ovately oblong r 
flat, obtuse or rounded at the points : upper ones lan- 
ceolate, acute, when young the margins slightly revo- 
lute, channelled on the upper side. Petioles pubescent, 
on the lower leaves about the length of the stipules, on 
the upper ones shorter. Stipules linear, acute, pubes- 
cent and ciliate, greener than the leaves. Racemes ter- 
minal, many-flowered. Bractes linear, fringed, about 
half the length of the pedicles. Pedicles densely clothed 
with a close white tomentum, nodding before the flowers 
expand, scarcely erect when expanded, afterwards re- 
flexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, smooth, or scarcely pubes- 
cent, 2 outer ones very small, oblongly lanceolate, blunt- 
ish, of a brownish purple, inner ones ovate, concave, 
scarcely acute, membranaceous, strongly four-nerved, 



the nerves more or less tinged with purple, and slightly 
pubescent. Petals 5, broader than long, rounded, more 
or less crumpled, . very much imbricate, of a reddish 
crimson with a small orange-coloured spot at the base^ 
Stamens from 60 to 70, about the length of the style : 
^filaments smooth, very slender, pale yellow : pollen yel- 
low. Oermen densely tomentose. Style much twisted, 
and very slender at the base, thickening upwards. 
Stigma capitate, granular. 

Our drawing of this handsome plant was made at 
the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, 
at Fulham ; it is nearly related to H. rkodanthum, but 
is readily distinguished by its canescent leaves and 
stronger growth : it is also related to H. roseum of 
Jacquin, but we think it can scarcely be the same spe- 
cies, and we have not yet had the opportunity of com- 
paring them. H. roseum of Allioni and Decandolle is 
a very different plant, of which we intend giving a 
figure in our next Number ; the present, we believe, 
bears the darkest coloured flower, if not the handsomest 
of the genus ; it is also very large for the size of the 
plant, which is well suited for the ornamenting of rock- 
work, but will require a little covering in severe frosty 
weather ; it succeeds well in a light sandy soil ; and 
young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in Autumn* 
soon strike root. 



<*/* 







7*. 







79 



HELIANTHEMUM virgatum. 
Slender-twigged Sun-Ro$e. 



Sect IX. Echblianthemum. SuprafoL 7. 
** Petalu albU, roseis, rubris vel dilute sulphur**. 



H, virgatum, caule suffruticoso, ramis virgatis incanis adscendenti- 
bns aeu erectis, foliis linearibns subtus canescentibns, stipulis 
lineari-subulatis, calycibua cano-pulverulentis pubescentibus. DC. 
prodr. 1. p. 282. ». 100. 

Helianthemum virgatum. Pert. syn. 2. p. 79. ». 65. Spreng. sy$L 2. 
p. 594. n. 97. £icrf. Aor*. brit. add. p. 469. n. 94. 

Cistus virgatns. Desf.flar. atlant. 1. p. 432. 



£fem suffruticose, producing numerous branches, 
which are at first erect, but as they lengthen out, they 
become more or less decumbent, not being strong 
enough to support their weight, their points ascending 
or becoming again erect, tinged with purple, and clo- 
thed with a short white close toraentum, quite white 
and thick on the young branches, but as they become 
older it gradually wears off. Leaves opposite, linear, 
acute, canescent on both sides, but most so under- 
neath, channelled on the upper side and strongly one- 
nerved on the lower, the margins slightly revolute, 
clothed on both sides with a close-pressed pubescence. 
Petioles clothed with a close-pressed canescent pubes- 
cence, flattened a little, and furrowed on the upper side 
and rounded at the back. 'Stipules linearly subulate, 
sharp-pointed, keeled at the back, longer than the pe- 
tioles, thickly clothed with close-pressed white woolly 
hairs. Racemes terminal, several-flowered, nodding 
before expansion, afterwards ascending, or becoming 
erect. Flowers pale rose-colour, leaning forward, or 



slightly nodding. Pedicles clothed with a hoary pu- 
bescence, nodding before the expansion of the flowers, 
becoming more erect as they expand, afterwards re- 
flexed. Bractes linear, acute, broader than the sti- 
pules, about the length of the pedicles. Calyx of 5 
sepals, hoary and pubescent; two outer ones small, 
oblong, obtuse, green, with a canescent margin : three 
inner ones ovate, obtuse, concave inwards, of a thin 
membranaceous texture, transparent, strongly 3-nerved, 
the nerves clothed with stiffish hairs. Petals 5, broad 
and rounded, imbricate, the points a little uneven, but 
scarcely crenulate, pale pink, rather darker at the sides. 
Stamens from 50 to 60: filaments slender, smooth, 
bright yellow, scarcely so long as the style: pollen 
golden yellow. Capsule densely tomentose, about the 
length of the calyx. Style very slender at the base, 
where it is more or less bent, thickening a little up- 
wards. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing of this beautiful species was taken from 
a fine plant, kindly sent to us from the Nursery of 
Messrs. Young, at Epsom, the only collection in which 
we have seen it ; it is a native of Barbary, and there- 
fore requires a little protection in Winter, either to be 
placed in a Frame, or to be covered with mats or straw 
in severe frost ; if planted in rock-work, a covering of 
straw, or a thick mat will be requisite ; but if grown 
in pots, they can be protected under a common garden 
frame ; a mixture of sandy loam and peat is a proper 
soil for it ; and young cuttings, planted under hand- 
glasses in August, will strike root readily. 



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38 



HELIANTHEMUM variegaturo. 
Variegated-flowered Sim-Rose. 



Sect IX. Edhblia^thbmum. Supra foil. 
•• Fetalis afais, roseis, rubris vel dilute sulphured. 



H. variegatum, caule auffrutiooao procumbente : ramia tomcntosis 
aabincanis tiffa^-procombojitibiis, foliia lanceolatis aontis planj- 
uscqHs: rabtfa tomentoso-incanis ; supra viridis sabscabris, sti- 
pulis lineaVibus ciliatis petiolo longionbus, calycibos breviter to- 
mentoais snbviolaceis, petalis undulatis. 

Heliaothemum variegatmn. Swt. hvrt. ML add. p. 469. «. 05. 



Stem suffruticose, much branched : branches procum* 
bent, spreading in all directions, their points ascend- 
ing, densely clothed with short white wool. Leaves 
opposite, lanceolate, acute, flat, or the tnargius some- 
times very slightly revolute; underneath clothed with 
a dense white tomeutum, the upper side channelled, of 
a glopsy green, but clothed with a few close pressed 
procumbent hairs, which gives them a slightly fringed 
appearance, a little roughened, occasioned by the innu- 
merable small punctures with which the leaf is covered. 
Stipules linear, bluntish, or sometimes acute, fringed 
with small hairs, a little longer than the petiole. Ra- 
cemes terminal, many-flowered. Bractes linear, acute, 
fringed. Pedicles densely tomentose, nodding before 
the flowers, expand, erect or a little declining when in 
flower, after flowering reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
clothed with a short thin tomentum: 2 outer sepals 
small, oblong, bluntish, hairy : inner ones ovate, ob- 
tuse, concave, membranaceous, of a violet colour, 
strongly 4-nervtd, the nerves slightly hairy. Petals 5, 
, rounded, imbricate, more or less crumpled and undu- 
late, the sides more or less bent inwards, beautifully 
variegated with white and rose-colour. Stamens about 

L 2 



the length of the style, the stigma overtopping them, 
from 60 to 80 in number : filaments smooth, of a bright 
yellow. Pollen yellow. German densely tomentose. 
Style smooth, a little bent at the base, thickened up- 
wards. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing of this plant was taken at the Apothe- 
caries' Company's Garden at Chelsea, where it is grow- 
ing in the rock-work in company with many other spe- 
cies; we believe it to be of hybrid origin, and most pro- 
bably between H. rhodanthum and H. lineare, which 
grow in company with it: when in full bloom it makes 
a very pleasing appearance, from the diversity of colours 
in its flowers, some being nearly all red, others varie- 
gated with dark and light red and white, and some alto- 
gether white; it also continues to bloom, if the weather 
prove favourable, from May till October ; this year we 
observed several flowers on it, the beginning of No- 
vember. It is quite hardy, having survived several Win- 
ters in the rock-work at Chelsea garden, without the 
least protection. Cuttings of it root freely, planted un- 
der hand-glasses in September, the glasses to have a 
little air at times, to keep them from damping, and the 
sooner they are potted off after being rooted the better, 
as they then establish themselves before Winter. 



I 

J 



coloured, with a dark orange-coloured spot at the base. 
Stamens 50 to 60 : Jlfanunts slender, smooth, bright 
yellow: patten yellow. Germen densely woolly. Style 
smooth, curved round at the base, thickening upwards. 
Stigma capitate, papillose. 

A very fine specimen of this handsome plant was 
growing last Summer in the rock-work of the Garden 
belonging to the Apothecaries* Company, at Chelsea, 
where our drawing was made; it is readily distin- 
guished from all others to which it is related, by its 
stiff upright growth ; a good representation of it is 
given in JWrelier's Icones, 440; but we cannot find it 
noticed by any modern author, nor do we see any re- 
ference to the figure in any work that we have exa- 
mined ; the flowers in our plant were very variable in 
colour, scarcely ever two on the plant were alike, some 
being of a bright red, others nearly yellow, some cop- 
per-coloured, others with a mixture of all those co- 
t<Mu*, and different shades between than, so that the 
plant when in flower had a curious variegated appear- 
ance. 

As the present subject is a native of the South of 
Europe, it cannot bear the severity of our sharpest 
Winters without protection; if grown in rock-work, 
}t will require to be covered with mats or dry litter in 
severe weather, but in mild weather will be best un- 
covered; it may also be grown in pots, where the 
plants will bloom well, and c»n be placed with the 
Other species in frames or pits in severe frosty weather; 
like the rest of the tribe, the present plant will succeed 
well in a light sandy soil, or a mixture of turfy loam, 
peat, and sand, will suit it very well. Cuttings strike 
root freely, if planted under hand-glasses* the latter 
pnd of Summer, or Autumn. 



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62- 




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82 



HELIANTHEMUM racemosum. 

Long racemed Sun-Rose* 



Sect. IX. EU HELIANTHEMUM. Suprafoll. 

•• PetaHs aUris f roseis, rubrii vel dilute $ulpkweis. 



H. racemotum, caule fruticoso ramoso, ramis erectis toretibus to- 
mentoso-incanis, foliia petiolatis linearibns vel lineari-lanceolatis 
margine revolutis supra nitidis sabtas incanis, stipulis subnlatis 
in ramis fioriferis petiolo longioribns, pedicellis incanis, calycibns 
nervoso-snlcatis violaceo-rufescentibug. 

Heliantbemum racemosum. Dunalin DC. prodr. 1. p.281. Spreng. 
«y*t. 2. p. 598. 

Cistas raceraosus. Linn. mant. 76 ? Lam. diet. 2. p. 25. Vahl tymb. 1 . 
p. 39. Willden. sp. pL 2. p. 1208. exchu. jyn. Cavan. et Barrel. 



Stem frutescent, much branched, clothed with a 
brown roughish bark, and marked with rings, where the 
leaves have fallen : branches erect, cylindrical, clothed 
with a close-pressed hoary woolliness. Leaves opposite, 
petiolate, linear, oblongly or lanceolately linear, acute, 
channelled on the upper side, the margins revolute: 
upper side of a bright shining green, quite smooth on 
the old leaves, but slightly pubescent wheu young; 
underneath pennately veined, and clothed with a short 
thinnish grey woolliness. Petioles clothed with a short 
dense tomentum, flattened a little on the upper side 
and rounded below, longest on the young Autumn 
shoots. Stipules attached to the base of the petioles, 
subulate, ciliate, the hairs pointing upwards : those on 
the flowering shoots louger than the petioles; but on 
the young Autumn shoots considerably shorter than the 
petioles. Racemes terminal, very long, clothed with a 
short dense woolliness, drooping or involute before the 
expansion of the flowers, afterwards lengthening out 

y2 



and becoming erect. Bractes fringed, similar to the up- 
per stipules. Pedicles longer than the bractes, densely 
clothed with a short grey tomentum. Calyx of 5 sepals ; 
the two outer ones small, bluntish, hairy, dark green ; 
the three inner ones ovate, acute, concave, membranace- 
ous between the angles, the angles rbarked with red or 
violet colour, smooth and glossy, slightly hairy. Pe- 
tals 5, imbricate, white, more or less uneven or crenulate 
at the edges, roundly obovate. Stamens numerous : JUa- 
ments smooth, yellow: pollen orange-coloured. Style 
twisted at the base. Stigma large, capitate, papillose. 

We also received the present handsome species from 
Mr. Miller, of the Bristol Nursery, at the same time as 
the subject of the last plate ; it is a scarce plant in our 
collections, we having never seen it in any of the Nur- 
series about London ; it is readily distinguished from 
all others to which it is related, by its upright growth 
and glossy leaves, and the red veins of the calyx ; it 
must not be confounded with Cistus racemosvs of 
Cavanilles, which is a variety of H. lavandtdafolium, ac- 
cording to Dunal in Decandolle's Prodromus, and is a 
yellow-flowered species. 

The present species is a native of Spain, Barbary, and 
the Canary Islands, and will stand our Winters, if not 
very severe, in the open ground; it is well adapted 
for ornamenting rock-work, from its handsome glossy 
foliage ; its flowers are also produced in succession near- 
ly all the Summer and till late in Autumn, thriving best 
in a light sandy soil ; it is also best to have some plants 
of it in pots, as those can be preserved in frames through 
the Winter, and can be planted out in Spring, to supply 
the places of any that may have been killed by frost : 
young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, any time 
from July to September, will strike root readily. 



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S02. 



49 



HjELIA j^JIEJMUM pilosum. 
Hairy Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Euhelianthkmum. Sujpra fol. 7. 
'•• Petalit ialbis, iweis, rubris vei dilu t k nUpknreis . 



H. pilpsitm, caule auberecto fruticoso ramoso ; ramis elongatis gra- 
cilibus verrucosis, foliis petiolatis linearibus margine revolutis 
subtaa tomentoso-incanis : snpi'a cano-Tirescentibus apice setosis, 
stipulis Uneari-subulatis potiololongioritms, racemis laxis paaci^ 
floria, oalycibus striatis piloaiusculis, oervis subviolaocis, petalia 
imbricatis. 

Helianthemum pilosum. Per*, syn. 2. p. 79. DC. prodr. I. p. 282. 
Swt.hort.brit.p.35. 



Stem shrubby, nearly erect, or ascending, branched : 
branches long and slender, erect or ascending, smooth 
and glossy, or slightly hairy, of a purple colour, more 
or less war ted. Leaves *petiolate, linear, bluntish, bris- 
tle-pointed, more or less hairy, margins much revolute, 
deeply channelled on the upper side, of a whitish green, 
occasioned by a dense minute pubescence, underneath 
clothed with a dense white tomentum. Petioles short, 
wbescent. Stipules linear, bluntish, fringed with short 
lairs, longer than the petioles. Racemes lax, 3 to 8- 
: lowered, clothed with a short white tomentum. Bractes 
\ inear, fringed, similar to the stipules. Peduncles slen- 
der, tomentose, nodding before the flowers expand, 
scarcely erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Ca- 
lyx of 5 sepals, more or less hairy, thinly clothed with 
a white tomentum : 2 outer sepals very small and nar- 
row, concave, bluntish; inner ones membranaceous, 
ovate, concave, bluntish, 3-nerved, nerves prominent, 
violet coloured. Petals 5, much imbricate, nearly or- 
bicular, more or less crumpled, of a paper white, stained 
with yellow at the base. Stamens from 60 to 70, scarcely 
as long as the style : filaments slender, smooth, pale 

o 



yellow: anthers attached by their back to the fila- 
ments: pollen bright yellow. Germen densely tomen- 
tose. Style smooth, twisted at the base, a little longer 
than the stamens. Stigma capitate, granularly fim- 
briate. 

The present plant is nearly related to H. lineare, and 
also to H. apenninum ; from the former it differs in its 
much whiter leaves, and in being more hairy; and 
from both by its imbricate paper-white petals ; it is a 
very pretty plant for the adorning of rock-work, and 
continues in flower a great part of the Summer ; it is 
also pretty hardy, standing our milder Winters in the 
open air without protection ; bat it is sometimes in- 
jured in the more severe ones; so that it is the safest 
way to have a few plants in pots, to be protected in 
frames, or to be covered with mats in sharp frosty 
weather. It succeeds well in any light sandy soil, or a 
mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit it very well ; 
and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in 
Autumn, strike root readily. Our drawing was made 
from a plant at the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, 
and Milne, last Summer. 



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48 



HELIANTHEMUM lineare. 
Linear-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Edhelianthemum. Supra fol.l. 
♦• Petali* albii, ro$eis, rubrit vel dilute tulphureis. 



H. Uneare, caule suffruticoso, ramis. elongatis adacendentibui sub- 
tomantoso-incanis, foliis linearibas obtusiusculis subtas caneacen- 
tibui margine revolutis, stipulis lineari-subnlatis petiolo brevio- 
ribns, racemis laxis virgatis paucifloris, calycibas striatis glabri- 
uscolis ; nerris subviolaceis, sepalis acutis, petalis subdistinctis. 

Helianthemam lineare. Pcrsoon. synop$. 2. p. 78. «. 4. DC. prodr. 
l.p.282. ».9J>. Swt.hort.brit.add.p.4Q9.n.93. Spreng. sy$t. 
v. 2. 0.503.*. 05. 

Cistiu linearis. Cava*, tc. 3. p. 8. t. 16. 



Stem shrubby, much branched, clothed with a brown 
glossy bark : branches ascending, crooked, very long 
and slender, the young ones clothed with a hoary to- 
mentum, which wears off by age. Leaves linear, blunt- 
ish, opposite, with a longish slender petiole, the mar- 
gins more or less revolute, underneath clothed with a 
hoary tomentum, and having a strong prominent mid- 
rib, the upper side when young clothed with short 
close-pressed hairs, which gives them at that time a 
hoary appearance ; this wears off when older, and they 
are then green and a little glossy. Petioles pubescent. 
Stipules small, linearly subulate, more or less hairy, 
shorter than the petioles. Racemes terminal, loose, 
few-flowered, clothed with a hoary tomentum, before 
flowering curved inward, but as the flowers expand 
becoming erect. Bractes short, lanceolate or linear, 
clothed with short hairs. Pedicles clothed with a short 
hoary tomentum, nodding before flowering, erect when 
in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
smoothish or slightly hairy, the two outer ones very 
small; inner ones ovate, acute, concave, striate, the 



nerves prominent, more or less tinged with red. Pe- 
tals 5, white, obovate or obcordate, slightly imbricate 
at the base, but distinct upwards. Stamens from 30 
to 40. Style curved. Stigma capitate. Capsule rough- 
ish. Seed brown, margined with a white membrana- 
ceous wing. 

This pretty little shrub is a native of the South of 
Europe, and is well adapted for rock-work, but it 
requires a little covering in Winter, and it is best to 
have some plants of it in pots, and those preserved in 
frames in severe weather, to supply the places of any 
that may be killed by the severity of the weather ; they 
succeed well in a light sandy soil, or a mixture Of sandy 
loam and peat will suit them very well. Cuttings, 
planted under hand-glasses in Autumn, will soon strike 
root ; they may also be raised from seeds, which ripen 
occasionally. 



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62 



HELIANTHEMUM apenninum. 
Apennine Sun-Rose. 



Sect IX. Euheli ANTHEMUM. Supra foL 7. 
•♦ Petalis albis t roseis, rubru vel dilute sulphureis. 



H. apenninum, caule suffruticoto ramoso, ramis patnlis cano-tomen- 
tosiusculis, foliis petiolatis oblongo-lioearibut margine vix revo- 
lutis subtus tomentosis : supra glaucescentibus demtim glabris, 
stipulis subulatii petiolo loDgioribus, calycibus brevissime villosis 
striatis glauco-ci nereis obtusiosculis. DC. prodr. I. p. 282. 

Helianthemum apenninum. DC.Jl.fr. 4. p. 824. Swt.kort.brit.p.$5+ 



Stem suffruticose, very much branched, the branches 
spreading or ascending, clothed with a short white to- 
mentum. Leaves petioled, oblongly linear, scarcely 
acute, slightly glaucous on the upper side, becoming 
smooth and glossy by age, clothed underneath with a 
short dense white tomentum, the margins very slightly 
revolute. Petioles short, tomentose. Stipules subulate, 
longer than the petioles. Racemes terminal, several- 
flowered, nodding before expansion, erect when in 
bloom. Flowers of a paper white. Pedicles slender, 
clothed with a white tomentum. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
which are clothed with Very short woolly hairs ; the two 
outer sepals very small, linear, obtuse, 3 inner ones 
ovate, obtuse, concave, striate, more or less tinged with 
purple. Petals 5, distinctly spreading, of a very thin 
texture, paper-white, with a small yellow spot at the 
base, more or less crumpled. Stamens from 40 to 50, 
spreading, shorter than the style: jilaments smooth, 
yellow. Germen densely tomentose. Style bent near the 
base, thickening upwards. Stigma large, capitate, pa- 
pillose. 

r2 



Our drawing of this plant was made last Summer at 
the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, where it was raised from 
seed received from the late Mr. Schleicher, of Bex, in 
Switzerland ; we also received plants of it from Mr. W. 
Anderson, at the Apothecaries' Company's Garden, at 
Chelsea; it makes a pretty plant for the adorning of 
rock-work, where it will succeed well without the least 
protection ; young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses 
in Autumn, will strike root readily, or it may be in- 
creased by seeds. 



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88 



HELIANTHEMUM poUfolium. 

White Mountain Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhklianthemum. Supra foil. 
** Petalis albis, roseis, maris vel dilute sulphureis. 



H. poUfolium, caule suffruticoso ramoso ; rami* procumbentibus dense 
tomentosis, foliis oblongo-linearibus margine revolutis utrinque to- 
mentoso-incanis, stipulis angusto-linearibus obtusis petiolo longi- 
oribus bracteisque tomentosis ciliatis, calycibus tomentosis, petalis 
distinctis subcrenulatis. 

Helianthemum polifolium. Pen. syn. 2. p. 80. Swt. hart. brit. p. 36. 
tt.79. 

Cistuspolifolius. Lirnt. spec. 745. Smith Flar. brit 576. E*g.bot.l$22. 
Camp, fiar.bnt. edit. % p. 95. Hudson. 234. Witheiing 492. Hull 
118. Dill. elth. 175. 1. 145. / 172. 



Stem 8uffrutescent, much branched ; branches pro- 
cumbent, the points more or less ascending, thickly 
clothed with a dense white tomentum. Leaves opposite, 
oblongly linear, bluntish, or scarcely acute, the mar- 
gins revolute, thickly clothed on both sides with a 
hoary white tomentum, so that they are of a greyish 
white on both sides, but whitest underneath. Petioles 
short, also densely woolly. Stipules narrowly linear, 
blunt, a little longer than the petioles, woolly and 
fringed. Racemes terminal, many-flowered, nodding, 
and the points incurved before expansion, afterwards 
becoming erect. Flowers white, nodding before expan- 
sion, erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Bractes 
similar to the stipules, shorter than the pedicles, densely 
woolly. Pedicles slender, woolly. Calyx of 5 sepals, 
densely clothed with a short tomentum, the two outer 
ones very small, narrowly linear, bluntish ; inner ones 
broadly ovate, obtuse, concave inwards. Corolla of 5 



petals, distinctly spreading, obovate, generally crenu- 
late at the margins. Stamens numerous, unequal in 
length : filaments smooth, yellow : pollen orange-co- 
loured. Germen clothed with a dense tomentam. Style 
smooth, slender, and bent near the bottom, thickening 
upwards. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

The present pretty species is a native of various parts 
of Devonshire and Somersetshire, but it is certainly 
not the H. volifolium of the continental Botanists, as 
they describe its leaves with a green and glossy upper 
side, and the calyx as smooth and glossy ; our plant is 
altogether hoary all over, and the calyx densely clo- 
thed with a short, close, white tomentum ; that it is the 
original plant of Dillenius, there can be no doubt, as 
we have specimens from the same place as he obtained 
those from which his figure was made ; we received 
our's from Mr. W. Christy, Junior, of Clapham-road, 
who gathered them himself on Brent-down, in Somer- 
setshire, and kindly sent them to us; we are also much 
obliged to Mr. Thomas Clark, Junior, of Bridgewater, 
who was so kind as to send us seeds from the same 

Elace, which were raised at Mr. Colvill's Nursery, but 
y some means got lost, before they flowered. 
Our drawing was made from a plant in the garden 
of Mr. Capper, at Clapton, that nad been received 
from Babbicombe, near Newton Abbott; we have 
compared the specimens with the Brent-down ones, 
and there is not the slightest difference in them. It is 
also abundant on Tor Hill, near Torquay, as we have 
been informed by Miss Southcote, an intelligent bo- 
tanical lady of that place. 

The plant that we believe to be H.polifolium of the 
continental Botanists, we possess a drawing of; it 
agrees precisely with their descriptions, and we intend 
to publish it in our next Number. 

The present species is quite hardy, and well adapted 
for rock- work ; it thrives well in a light sandy soil; 
and cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, root readily. 
The figure in English Botany is not good, nor well 
coloured ; the leaves are much too green. 



//?s 




29 



HELIANTHEMUM pulverulentum. 
Powdered Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. EUHRLIANTHBMUM. S*pr* t fol.1. 

*• Petaiu albis, rose**, rubris vet dUuik sulphured. 



BL pulverulentum, canle anffruticoso ramosissimo proatrato : ramis 
inoano-tomentoaiaaciilis, foliis oblongo-linesribaa margine rcvo- 
lufb obtasis sabtaa incanis supra glaucis, stipulta snbulatia ciliatis 
apice setosU petiolo longioribua, calycibos canescentibes minute 
tomentoso-pnbescentibus, petalis valde imbricatis. 

Helianthemnm pulverulentum. DC. Jt. fir. 4. p. 823. Prodr. 1. 
p. 282. Pen. «yn. 2. p. 80. Swt. hart. brit. p. 36. ft. 74. 

Ciitas palvernlentaa. Pourr. act. tout. 8. p. 811. 



Sfcm* suffruticose, prostrate, very much branched, 
and spreading in all directions: branches opposite, 
densely clothed with a close-pressed white tomentum. 
Leaves opposite, oblongly linear, obtuse, margins reyo- 
lute, underneath clothed with a close white tomentum, 
the upper side of a glaucous powdery appearance, ori- 
ginating from small close-pressed white hairs, with 
which the upper surface is covered, and is more con- 
spicuous on the young leaves. Petioles short, tomen- 
tose and hairy. Stipules subulately linear, longer than 
the petioles, hairy and ciliate, bristly at the point. Ra- 
cemes terminal, several flowered. Bractes linear, blunt- 
ish, hairy and ciliate, more than half the length of the 
peduncles. Peduncles clothed with a dense white pu- 
bescence and hairs intermixed, nodding before the 
flowers expand, and often when in flower, afterwards 
reflexed. Calyx of 5 sepals, the 2 outer ones small, 
oblong, bluntish, very hairy : inner ones ovate, con- 
cave, bluntish, strongly 4-nerved, the nerves clothed 
with short rigid hairs, and between them with a short 
white close pubescence. Petals 5, much imbricate and 

i 



crumpled, roundly obcordate, white with a small yel- 
low spot at the base, and tinged round with a sulphur 
colour. Stamens from 60 to 70, about the length of the 
style ; filaments slender, yellow : pollen yellow, Ger- 
men clothed with a close-pressed pubescence. Style 
curved, smooth, thickening upwards. Stigma capi- 
tate, tuberculate. 

Our drawing of this species was taken from a fine 
strong plant growing in the rock- work of the Garden 
belonging to the Apothecaries' Company at Chelsea, in 
June last : it is very hardy, as it stood the last Winter 

Suite well, without the least protection ; it is readily 
istinguished from all those to which it is nearest re- 
lated, by its white blunt leaves, and its very much im- 
bricated thin flaccid petals; we do not know any one 
with which it can be confounded, but is nearer related 
to H. apenninum than any other. Its flowers are not 
so showy as some of the other species; but they never- 
theless make a pleasing variety ; and in a large piece 
bf rock- work, where a great many species are planted, 
we think the beauty depends very much on the different 
sorts of colours being properly mixed ; and we often 
see too many plants of a fine thing grown together, 
which very much diminishes both its beauty and rarity, 
particularly when there are not some less beautiful to 
compare with it. 

The present plant will grow freely in any common 
garden soil, and will thrive in any situation that is 
not too moist ; it may also be grown in a pot, in a light 
sandy soil, and will need no protection in Winter. 
Cuttings planted underhand-glasses in Autumn, strike 
root readily. 



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HELIANTHEMUM confusum. 

Confused Sun-Rose. 



Sect* IX. Euhblianthbmum. Supra fol.l. 
*• PetcUis aUris, ro$eii, rubrit vel dilute tuiphureii. 



H. confusum, caule suffruticoso, ramis procumbentibus glabriusculis 
apice subtomentosis, foliis oblonris ovatis obtasiusculis subplanis 
subtle tomentoso-incanis supra glabris viridibus, stipulis bracteis- 
que linearibus viridibus ciliatis, calycibus striatis glabriusculis 
subnitidis. DC. prodr. 1. p. 263. tub H. polifolio. 



Stem suffrutescent, procumbent, extending to a con- 
siderable distance, branched : branches procumbent, the 
points ascending, smooth when old, but clothed with a 
white tomentum while young, so that the lower part is 
smooth, and the upper part tomentose. Leaves ovate 
or oblong, bluntish, the lower ones shorter and rounder, 
flat or nearly so, underneath clothed with a short 
white tomentum, the upper side green, and somewhat 
glossy, but more or less clothed with shortish hairs ; 
these are most conspicuous on the young leaves, as they 
wear off as the leaves become older. Petioles short, 
flattened a little on the upper side, pubescent on the 
young leaves. Stipules linear, acute, longer than the 
petioles, somewhat hairy and fringed, of a bright green 
colour. Racemes terminal, elongated, several-flowered, 
nodding before expansion, but becoming erect as the 
flowers expand. Bractes green, fringed, similar to the 
stipules, shorter than the pedicles. Pedicles tomentose, 
drooping before expansion, erect when in bloom, after- 
wards reflexed. Flowers white and delicate. Calyx of 
5 sepals ; the two outer ones small, bluntish, dark 
green, hairy and fringed ; the three inner ones ovate, 



concave inwards, bluntiBh, with membranaceous inner 
margins, striated with dark green veins, somewhat 
hairy but glossy. Petals 5, more or less imbricate, or 
somewhat distinct, rounded but uneven at the margins. 
Stamens numerous, spreading, unequal in length : jila- 
tnents pale yellow : pollen golden yellow. Style about 
the length of the stamens, curled round at the base, 
slender below and thickening upwards. Stigma capi- 
tate, papillose. 

The present plant is the one generally cultivated in 
the Nurseries as H. potifolium, and we believe the 
plant intended by most of the continental botanists, 
judging from their descriptions ; but it has certainly 
nothing, to do with the the English plant, though it is 
not very unlike the figure in English Botany, the leaves 
of which are coloured much too green, it k reaHy was 
taken from a native specimen, as there asserted ; the 

S resent is a common plant in the Nurseries about Lon- 
on, and is well suited for the ornamenting of rock- 
work, as it is quite hardy, thriving well in a light 
sandy soil ; and young cuttings, planted under hand- 
glasses fn Spring and Autumn, strike root readily. 

Our drawing was made, several years ago, at the 
Nursery of Mr. Cofvill ; but we dieferred publishing it, 
till we should have an opportunity of comparing it with 
the wild English species. We showed our drawing to 
Mr. Lagasca some time since, who* immediately pro- 
nounced it to be the Spanish H. polifotium. 



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100 



HELIANTHEMUM lanceolatum, 

Spear-leaved Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foil: 
** Petalis alibis, roseis, rubris vel dilute sulphured. 



H. toneeolatum, caule suffruticoso ramosissimo procumbente; ramis 
adscendentibus glabriusculis apice tomentoso-incanis, foliis lanceo- 
late acutis margine subrevolutis supra viridis glabriusculis subtus 
tomentoso-incanis, stipulis subulato-linearibus petiolo longioribus, 
sepalis glabriusculis subpilosis, petalis imbricatis. 



Stem sufirutescent, procumbent, very much branch- 
ing : branches ascending or erect, clothed when young 
with a close white down, this wears off by age, and 
they then become smooth. Leaves opposite, petiolate, 
lanceolate, acute, slightly revolute at the margins, green 
and rather glossy on the upper side, but clothed with 
short hairs, most abundant on the young leaves, under- 
neath clothed with a short white tomentum. Petioles 
short, flattened a little on the upper side, hairy. Stipules 
about twice the length of the petioles, linearly subulate, 
hairy and fringed. Racemes terminal, many-flowered, 
nodding and involute before the flowers expand, but 
becoming erect as they come into bloom ; the flower- 
stem thickly clothed with white down. Bractes linearly 
lanceolate, acute, hairy and fringed, nearly as long as 
the pedicles, and sometimes exceeding some of them in 
length. Pedicles densely tomentose, drooping before the 
flowers expand, erect when in bloom, afterwards reflex- 
ed. Calyx inflated, of 5 sepals, the two outer ones very 
small, bluntish, of a dark green : inner ones short, ovate, 
concave, blunt, 3 to 5- veined or striate, somewhat glossy 



but clothed with shortish hairs. Petals 5, white, imbri- 
cate at the margins, broadly rounded, somewhat crum- 
pled, narrowing to the base, a little uneven at the mar- 
gins, marked with yellow at the base. Stamens nume- 
rous: filaments smooth, slender, pale yellow: pollen 
orange-coloured. Style very slender, and curled round 
at the base, thickening upwards, where it becomes club- 
shaped. Stigma capitate, papillose. 

We believe the present plant to be one of those that 
has been confused with tl.polifolium by some Botanists, 
as we have seen it by that name in several collections ; 
but it is a very different plant, readily distinguished by 
its sharp pointed leaves, which ^re of a glossy green on 
the upper side, and by its broad imbricated petals. 

Our drawing was made from a plant growings in the 
rock- work, in the garden belonging to the Apothecaries' 
Company, at Chelsea, where it was raised by Mr. W. 
Anderson, from seeds that he received from the Conti- 
nent, under the name of H. polifolium; it is quite hardy, 
remaining all the Winter tininjured without any pro- 
tection, succeeding well in a light sandy soil ; and young 
cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, the latter end of 
Summer or Autumn, strike root freely. 



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103 

HELIANTHEMUM maci-anthon. 

Great-flowered Sun-Rase. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. Supra foil. 
** Petalis albi*, roseis, rubri* vel dilute sulphureis. 



H. macnmthon, oaule suflrutiooso, ranis prociuabentibos tomentesi- 
usculis, foliis plasi* oyalo-ohtongis acutiueculis siipdt glabris sub- 
tiks levissime tomentosis pallide cinereis, stipulis pilosiusculis pe- 
tiolo subaequalibus vel longioribus, calycibus striatis pilosis, petalis 
distinctis. 



Stem suffiruticose, much branched : branches procum- 
bent, clothed with a thin tomentura, the upper part 
tinged with purple. Leaves large and flat, orately ob- 
long, obtuse, or scarcely acute, the upper side green, 
smooth, and glossy, or very thinly clothed with hairs, 
which are mostly in pairs, underneath clothed with a 
short thin tomentum, besides numerous little bunches 
of hairs which give a greyish appearance, the hairs are 
fixed on minute tubercles which occasions a roughness. 
Petioles hairy, furrowed on the upper side and rounded 
on the lower. Stipules narrowly lanceolate, acute, frin- 
ged with long hairs : lower ones about the length of the 
petioles : upper ones double the length. Racemes ter- 
minal, nodding before expansion, afterwards becoming 
erect and lengthening out. Bractes lanceolate, slightly 
falcate, fringed with long hairs. Pedicles clothed with 
a thin tomentum and some longer hairs intermixed, 
tinged with purple, nodding before the flowers expand, 
erect when in bloom, afterwards reflexed. Calyx of 5 
sepals; the two outer ones small, oblongly lanceolate, 
spreading, and fringed with long hairs ; the three inner 



ones ovate, membranaceous, concave, acute, strongly 
S-nerved, the nerves very prominent, and clothed with 
bunches of long hairs which are seated on little tuber- 
cles ; between the nerves smooth and glossy. Petals 5, 
distinctly spreading, of a cream-coloured white, pale 
yellow near the base, obovately wedge-shaped, very 
slender at the base, slightly crenulate at the ends. Sta- 
mens about 80 : filaments long, smooth, bright yellow : 
pollen yellow. Gennen densely tomentose. Style smooth, 
a little bent and slender, at the base, thickening up- 
wards, about the length of the stamens. Stigma large, 
capitate, papillose. 

Our drawing of the present strong growing and large 
flowered species, was taken from a plant at the Nursery 
of Mr. J. Lee, at Hammersmith, where it was culti- 
vated in pots, and also in the open ground ; it is of 
rather a loose straggling growth, producing long shoots 
that spread out on the ground, but its flowers are very 
large and showy ; it is also quite hardy ; and the best 
situation for it is rock-work, where it will grow more 
compact, by b^ing in a dry exposed situation, than it 
will if planted in rich soil in the flower-borders : young 
cuttings of it strike root readily if planted under hand- 
glasses, any time from July to the end of September; 
it is nearer related to H. mutabile than to any other 
species. 



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104 

HELIANTHEMUM macranthon multiple*. 
Double great-Jlowered Sun-Rose. 



Sect. IX. Euhelianthemum. SuprafoL 7. 
** Fetalis albis, roseis, rubris vel diluti sulpkurei*. 



H. macranthon, caule suffruticoso, raniis procumbentibus tomentosi- 
usculis, foliis planis ovato-oblongis acutiusculis supra glabris sub- 
tus levissime tomentosis pallida ci nereis, stipulis pilosiusculis pe- 
tiolo subaequalibus vel longioribus, calycibus striatis pilosis, petalis 
distinctis. SuprafoL 103. 

a simplex, foliis majoribus, floribus simplicibus. Supra t. 103. 

$ multiplex, foliis inferioribus subrotundis, floribus plenis. Supra. 



Stem suffrutescent, much branched: branches pro- 
cumbent, clothed with a thin tomentum, which in time 
wears off, they then become smooth. Leaves flat ; lower 
ones nearly round, or of a roundish oval, obtuse; the 
upper ones ovately oblong, more acute, the upper side 
green and glossy, but hairy; underneath clothed with 
a thin white tomentum, besides some bunches of hairs, 
which give a greyish appearance ; the hairs fixed on 
minute tubercles, which occasions a roughness. Petioles 
short, hairy, furrowed on the upper side and rounded 
on the lower. Stipules linearly lanceolate, acute, fringed 
with long hairs, lower ones about the length of the pe- 
tioles, upper ones about twice their length. Racemes 
terminal, several-flowered, nodding before expansion, 
afterwards lengthening out and becoming erect. Brac- 
tes lanceolate, somewhat falcate, fringed with long hairs. 
Pedicles clothed with a thin tomentum and longer hairs 
intermixed, nodding before the flowers expand, nearly 
erect when in bloom. Calyx of 5 sepals ; the two outer 



ones small, oblongly lanceolate, spreading, and fringed : 
the three inner ones ovate, concave, membranaceous, 
acute, strongly 3-nerved, the nerves very prominent, 
and clothed with bunches of hairs, that are seated on 
little tubercles. Flowers white, very double, a great 
number of the stamens being turned into petals. 

Our drawing of this pretty double variety, was taken 
from a plant at the Nursery of Mr. J. Lee, at Ham- 
mersmith ; it is quite as hardy as the single variety, and 
is well adapted for growing in rock-work, or in small 

Sots, mixed with the other species; by cutting off the 
ower-stems as soon as the flowers are dropped, will in- 
crease the strength of the young shoots, and occasion 
diem to push oat other racemes of flowers in succes- 
sion ; so as to continue in bloom the greater part of the 
Summer: young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses 
in Spring or Autumn, will strike root readily. 



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36 

HUDSONIA ericoides. 

Heath-like Hudsonia. 



HUDSONIA. Calyx tnbulosns 5-partitas: segmentis 9 externis 
minatis. Petala 5. Stamina 0-30: filamenta filiformia; anthero 
parvula, bilobee, longitadinaliter dehiscentes. Stylus suberectas 
simplex staminibns aBqualis. Stigma simplex. Capsula 1-locnlaris, 
3-valvis, 1-3 sperm a, oblonga vel obovata, coriacea, lsBvis vel pubes- 
cens. Semina granulata. Embryo in albumine corneo immersus.— 
Suffrutices parvi, sapid* c&spitotu Folia alterna, parvula, subulata, 
acerota, imbricata, exstipulata. Flores subtessiUs vel pedunculati ; 
pednnculi uniftori t tolitarii terminalesque vel lateraliter aggregate 
DC. prodr.l. p. 284. nonnullis mutatis. 



H. ericoides, pubescens, caule suffimtieoso snberecto : ramis elon* 
gatis, foliis filiformibus subulatis snbimbricatis, peduncnlis late* 
raliter e gemmis foliaoeis solitariis, calycibns cylindricis obtosis, 
capsulis pubescentibus semper monospermis, valvulis oblongis. 
DC. prodr. 1. p. 285. 

Hudsonia ericoides. Linn. mant. 74. Lam. ill. t. 407. Wifld. sp. 
pL 2. p. 858. HorL beroL U 15. Pert. *yn. 2. p. 6. PnrthJL amer. 
sept. 2. p. 364. Hort. Kew. ed. 2. v. 3. p. 146, 147. NuttaUgen. 
amer. 2. p. 4 ? 



A short densely branched suffruticose plant, from a 
span to near a foot in height; branches erect, elongated, 
thickly clothed with leaves, and densely crowded to- 
gether. Leaves, like some species of Heaths, subulately 
linear, more or less imbricate, becoming more patent 
as they advance in age, and remaining persistent for 2 
or 3 years; thickly clothed with spreading white hairs, 
as is every other part of the plant, except the corolla; 
this gives the whole plant a sort of hoary appearance. 
Peduncles solitary, one-flowered, each proceeding from 
the side of one of the gemmae, or little tufts of leaves, 
with which the branches are crowded, and some of 
which afterwards lengthen out into shoots; when the 
flowers first expand, the peduncles are very short, but 



they continue to lengthen as the capsule is coming to 
perfection, until they are from 5 to 8 lines in length ; 
more or less tinged with brown, as is the calyx. Calyx 
tubular, 5-parted : segments very unequal, the three in- 
ner ones more than double the size of the other two, and 
obtuse, the two outer ones very narrow, and acute. Pe- 
tals 5, distinctly spreading, of a bright but pale yellow, 
obovately ovate. Stamens from 9 to 15, spreading when 
the flower first expands, afterwards closing round the 
style : filaments unequal in length, smooth, pale yellow, 
about the length of the style: anthers small, 2-lobed, 
the lobes distant and distinct, opening longitudinally: 
pollen golden yellow. Germen downy. Style erect, or 
slightly bent, smooth. Stigma simple, very small. 

This elegant little plant is at present very scarce in 
our collections, owing to its being supposed to be very 
difficult of cultivation; but our present subject thrives 
very well, and grows quite luxuriant in a pot of sandy 
peat soil; and would, we expect, still grow more lux- 
uriant, if planted out in a bed of sandy peat, in rather 
a shady situation, as it is said to cover large tracts of 
ground in America, in the sandy Pine woods, in the same 
manner as the common heath in England. 

H. ericoides of Nuttall, is, as M. Decandolle ob- 
serves, most probably quite a different species from the 
present plant, as he describes the flowers as growing in 
fascicles, and the present only produces them singly. 
Young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in sandy 
peat soil in the open air, in August or September, will 
strike root, if the glasses are occasionally taken off to 
dry them, that they may not damp. 

Our drawing was taken from a plant, procured for us 
in flower by Mr. G. Gbarlwood, in July last. 



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57 

HUDSONIA tomentosa. 
Tomentose Hudsonia. 



H. tomentma, easapitoaa et incano-tonentoaa, caulibus intricatia d*n- 
aia, foliia minatis denafe imbrioatii ovato-acntia, floribns aggrega- 
tia aubaeaailibva, calycibns subcyliodricia partitiouibua obtaaia, 
oapanlis monospermis, valvis ovatislaevibus, DC* prodr. 1. p. 285. 

Hndaoniatomefitosa. Nutt.ge*.2. p. a. Spreng. $ysL 2. p. 462. Swt. 
htrt. brit. add. p. 460. 



A short, densely tufted suffruticose plant, about a span 
high : branches short, crowded, ascending, densely to- 
mentose, and thickly clothed with leaves, which are per- 
sistent, and remain on long after they are turned brown, 
so that the branches are always crowded with them. 
Leaves crowded, minute, scarcely a line in length, close- 
ly imbricated, oblong or ovate, acute, densely clothed 
with a white silky tomentum, which gives the plant a 
sort of silvery appearance. Flowers small, of a pale 
bright yellow, sessile or on very short footstalks, each 
seated on one of the little gemmae, or small tufts of 
leaves with which the branches are crowded, so that 
when they are expanded they appear in clusters. Calyx 
cylindrical, 5-cleft, clothed with a silky tomentum, the 
segments obtuse, two of them much smaller than the 
others. Petals 5, distinctly spreading, obovate, concave, 
longitudinally lined. Stamens from 10 to 18; filaments 
slender, smooth, longer than the style, but scarcely so 
long as the petals. Ovarium 3-sided, smooth, and glossy. 
Style smooth, erect Stigma simple. 

Our drawing of this rare plant was made in July 
last, at the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, where several plants 
of it have been lately received from North America ; it 
was first discovered by Mr. Nuttall, and described by 
him in his Genera of North American Plants, in 1818, 
where he notices it as a very distinct species, " growing 

Q 



on the drift sands of the ocean, in New Jersey, Dela- 
ware, Maryland, &c." The soil in which the plants 
came home was chiefly fine white sand, with a small 
admixture of decayed vegetable soil, so that to grow 
them in perfection in this country, it will be requisite to 
plant them in the same sort of soil, or iu a mixture of 
light turfy peat and sand, to be composed chiefly of the 
latter; sea-sand, where it can be procured, is to be pre- 
ferred : it will also be mere likely to succeed well in a 
situation near the sea, than in an inland part of the 
country. It is also a very proper plant for rock- work, 
if planted in the same sort of sandy soil, where its little . 
bushy canescent tufts vill make a handsome appear- 
ance: young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, 
under hand-glasses or bell-glasses, will strike root rea- 
dily, so that a little air be given them that they may 
not damp off; as soon as rooted, they should be potted 
off in small pots ; for it left under the glasses, they will 
certainly damp, being so densely clothed with pubes- 
cence ; or if not convenient to pot them off immediately, 
a great deal of air must be admitted to them ; and as 
soon as they are properly hardened, the glasses should 
be taken quite away; when hardened in that manner, 
they may be taken up with little balls attached to them ; 
and when potted, if placed in a shady situation, they 
will need no other protection ; but if potted off as soon 
as rooted, they will require to be placed in a close frame 
for a few days, to make fresh roots, and must be har- 
dened to the air by degrees. 



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